All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

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  • Fri, Jul 30, 2021 - 01:29am

    #15

    Arthur Robey

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    The Graphene-cell electro-chemical link.

I offered this link a couple of days ago about the electrical field-morphic link.

Well it looks as though the graphene disrupts the electric fields of cells. (And hence their morphology?)




  • Fri, Jul 30, 2021 - 01:31pm

    #16
    AkamaiRx

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

So here is some work using Graphene Oxide (GO) to make antibodies more toxic to CD20 cells to treat NHL.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26859679/

Maybe it is just a good drug delivery system.

But then again… Could GO in the Covid-19 vaccines facilitate targeting of particular cells?

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 03:05am

    #16
    Primary Care_MD

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

“Here, get the shot.”

“What’s in it?”

“I can’t tell you.”

“What are the long-term side effects?”

“Dont know. But your college says you have to have it.”

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 11:44am

    #17
    sammaye

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    Reply To: All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

“What I said was that I think it’s too quick to reject this. What other remotely plausible explanation is there, for why refrigerator magnets are sticking to vaccine recipients’ arms?”

This is nothing new, over the decades many people have complained that vaccines have made them magnetic when in reality there are more forms of magnetism than simply magnetic, for example what do you think flies use to walk on the ceiling?

One simple test would be put talcum powder on the spot and then stick it.

Also, graphene is very very veeery low magnetism and only shows nay real magnetism when formed into certain structures which amplifies it.

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 12:38pm

    #18
    tbp

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

In the Karen Kingston interview, she shows that Moderna uses “SM102” (and also that Pfizer uses “ALC-0159”) lipid nanoparticles, both manufactured by Sinopeg. And then she also proves that Sinopeg has expertise in fabricating “polyethylene glycol functionalized graphene” nanocomposites. This is indeed a suspicious connection.

Yes, but that’s in line with the research about graphene and how it could be used as a vaccine adjuvant, among other biotech applications.

In this interview, Whitney Webb goes through the entire study:

https://odysee.com/@TLAVagabond:5/Whitney-Webb-Interview-7-23-21:2

It’s pretty clear that the “biostatistician” who commissioned it is being dishonest and wanted to find something he didn’t find but made it look like it’s very likely when it’s not very likely, leveraging all the graphene and vaccines research and the magnetization mystery that is in need of an explanation. He also claims that GO is the only toxic ingredient, administered through vaxxes, PCR swabs, etc. He says nothing about spike proteins, and he even says there’s no virus.

And about Karen Kingston, as Jordan Sather points out, her LinkedIn has her only as a marketing and sales rep, not a “pharmaceutical medical device analyst”. I’ve yet to see the interview, but Sather also says that she says that graphene and graphite are lead, rather than forms of carbon.

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 06:20pm   (Reply to #18)

    #19
    jerryr

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

The Whitney Webb interview is two hours long, and I didn’t take the time to watch the entire interview. Instead I skipped around, and found a section starting around 1:30:00 where she talks about the conclusion of the report from Dr. Madrid. She notes that Madrid’s study does not claim to be conclusive or final, and that she found the evidence even less convincing than Madrid claimed it was.

But on the other hand, I didn’t hear her dismiss it entirely! She went on to complain that Delgado misrepresented the images and contents of the study. She does seem to be accusing him of dishonesty, incompetence, or both. This allegation seemed to be mostly based on discrepancies in the scale of the various images. But I scrolled through the comments section for the video, and found a viewer who thought Delgado was getting it right, and Webb was misinterpreting.

Undoubtedly, Delgado has an agenda. He’s been arguing for some time that there is no virus, and that this entire scenario is about graphene. That seems pretty unlikely to me. I think Delgado is probably wrong that there’s no virus. But he could be right that graphene is another part of the picture.

I don’t see much value in determining whether Webb or Delgado is correct about the interpretation of the image scales or other details of Dr. Madrid’s study, because I don’t see how there could be any definitive conclusion coming out of this. I can only agree with Chossudovsky, who says that there’s enough concern about the contents of the vaccine, to merit research and investigation by other labs.

It seems reasonable to me that a marketing & sales rep could have a title like “pharmaceutical medical device analyst”, so I don’t see any dishonesty there. And if she’s a marketing & sales rep, she could honestly be confused about whether graphene is made of carbon or lead. Regardless of any of that, she turned up these interesting graphene product descriptions & patents.

Sammaye says that there have been rumors for years about vaccines causing magnetism. I’ve seen a few rumors about recent flu vaccines, but nothing more than that.

The magnetic effect that’s being reported for these covid-19 vaccines, is not the same thing as adhesion caused by moisture or surface tension. Many of the investigators considered this possibility and ruled it out.

There seems to be a temptation here, to leap to a conclusion that the graphene oxide theory is “bunk” just because the evidence presented isn’t sufficient to prove that it’s a fact.

There’s also a temptation to leap to the equally unsound conclusion that now we have proof of what we suspected all along, that this is a criminal conspiracy to depopulate the planet! And let’s do everything we can to make this information go viral, ASAP!!

But isn’t it best to file this in the “maybe” category for now?

Meanwhile, contrary to Sammaye’s post, we do know that many covid-19 vaccine recipients are exhibiting magnetic injection sites. That’s an unsolved mystery. It seems reasonable to me to keep the graphene speculation alive, as long as it’s the only plausible explanation for vaccine magnetism that anyone has come up with. (And if anyone has another explanation that’s just as good or better, please don’t be shy! I’m open to other ideas, I just haven’t seen any.)

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 07:09pm

    #18
    sammaye

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

> It seems reasonable to me that a marketing & sales rep could have a title like “pharmaceutical medical device analyst”, so I don’t see any dishonesty there. And if she’s a marketing & sales rep, she could honestly be confused about whether graphene is made of carbon or lead. Regardless of any of that, she turned up these interesting graphene product descriptions & patents.

 

Let’s be clear, the work she has done in the last 30 years for Pfizer is actually outsource work and her website makes no clarity about how much or when (many freelances do one or two jobs for a client and class them as a recurring and mainstream client), she is a freelance marketer claiming to have inside knowledge of R&D. This scenario is very common in programming jobs, she would never have had access to such stuff and at most would have been asked to design a marketing campaign for some meds

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 07:12pm

    #19
    sammaye

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

To exp[and on my comment, https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/covid-19/can-vaccines-make-our-body-magnetic this link actually provides previous cases,. as I said this is a long standing issue spanning decades. The reason for using talcum powder is that it removes the magnetic mist that forms on surfaces and instead tests actual magnetism

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 07:21pm

    #20
    sammaye

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

In fact in many videos she claims to be a whistle-blower, to which she has no claim, she has no where near enough knowledge for that.

Here’s another thing to think about as well, to make yourself magnetic you would need to displace enough magnetic material to dilute nearly 10 pints of blood to be able to randomly stick things to you. Dong such an action would likely cause plasma leakage.

There are so many recognised medical issues to diluting blood in such a way that would allow this that it seems crazily far-fetched tbh

  • Sat, Jul 31, 2021 - 09:29pm   (Reply to #20)

    #21
    Friedrichs_teeth

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    All along I thought the graphene oxide thing was bunk

Here’s another thing to think about as well, to make yourself magnetic you would need to displace enough magnetic material to dilute nearly 10 pints of blood to be able to randomly stick things to you. Dong such an action would likely cause plasma leakage.

What is the source of that? That sounds like the person is imagining that the whole body is magnetic. That is not the claim.

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