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Adapting In Place

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  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 04:09pm

    #1

    suziegruber

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    Adapting In Place

There is a great post on the Oil Drum from Sharon Astyk called "Adapting In Place: Whether, Why and Wherefore Ought Thou."  It is a post discussing the common dilemma of whether or not to relocate in the face of our current situation.

 http://www.theoildrum.com/node/5059#more

 I actually relocated a couple of years ago in response to Peak Oil and realized that it was a poor choice, so I relocated back to where I had significant community.

 –Suzie G.

  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 07:23pm

    #2
    SamLinder

    SamLinder

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    Re: Adapting In Place

[quote=suziegruber]

There is a great post on the Oil Drum from Sharon Astyk called "Adapting In Place: Whether, Why and Wherefore Ought Thou."  It is a post discussing the common dilemma of whether or not to relocate in the face of our current situation.

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/5059#more

I actually relocated a couple of years ago in response to Peak Oil and realized that it was a poor choice, so I relocated back to where I had significant community.

–Suzie G.

[/quote]

Excellent post, Suzie G.

This information has been sorely needed on this site for some time. Too many members have vociferously advocated relocating as an all or nothing choice. I am delighted to see Ms. Astyk offering realistic alternatives to those who cannot, or choose not, to relocate. Thank you so much for highlighting an alternative perspective.

  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 07:50pm

    #3

    DrKrbyLuv

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    Re: Adapting In Place

suziegruber – Thanks for the great post and link.

I’m ready financially and will be dumping my gas-hog SUV within a couple of months.  But I’ve been putting off the other strategies as mentioned in your post.  I don’t like yard work and have a terrible track record for having things I plant die within a year or two. 

I have to revisit these things with some discipline as I think being independent and self sustaining will be a key for maintaining any quality of life in the face of what’s coming.

Larry

  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 07:54pm

    #4
    switters

    switters

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    Re: Adapting In Place

[quote=SamLinder][quote=suziegruber]

There is a great post on the Oil Drum from Sharon Astyk called "Adapting In Place: Whether, Why and Wherefore Ought Thou."  It is a post discussing the common dilemma of whether or not to relocate in the face of our current situation.

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/5059#more

I actually relocated a couple of years ago in response to Peak Oil and realized that it was a poor choice, so I relocated back to where I had significant community.

–Suzie G.

[/quote]

Excellent post, Suzie G.

This information has been sorely needed on this site for some time. Too many members have vociferously advocated relocating as an all or nothing choice. I am delighted to see Ms. Astyk offering realistic alternatives to those who cannot, or choose not, to relocate. Thank you so much for highlighting an alternative perspective.

[/quote]

 

Sam,

Judging from your posts, I think you’d really enjoy reading Sharon Astyk’s blog, and reading her book, "Depletion & Abundance".  

  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 08:01pm

    #5
    SamLinder

    SamLinder

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    Re: Adapting In Place

[quote=Chris Kresser]

Sam,

Judging from your posts, I think you’d really enjoy reading Sharon Astyk’s blog, and reading her book, "Depletion & Abundance".  

[/quote]

Chris,

Thanks for the links. I’ll check them out. There’s so much to read on this site and others that it’s hard to keep up with it all. If I had to work full time for a living, I don’t know how I would manage!  Foot in mouth

  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 08:57pm

    #6

    scotthw

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    Re: Adapting In Place

[quote=Chris Kresser] 

Sam,

Judging from your posts, I think you’d really enjoy reading Sharon Astyk’s blog, and reading her book, "Depletion & Abundance".  

[/quote]

 

I am part way through that book now, I find it a great comfort, I gain a lot of equlibrium from it.

  • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 10:09pm

    #7
    capesurvivor

    capesurvivor

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    Re: Adapting In Place

A good thread title; I think of myself as surviving-in-place (though I guess thriving in place would be better…)

 

SG

  • Fri, Feb 06, 2009 - 01:55pm

    #8
    RussB

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    Re: Adapting In Place

This has been much on my mind for awhile now, since for several reasons it doesn’t seem possible for me to adapt in place, yet I don’t see any good prospect for relocating anytime soon, even as I think time is running short.

Hmm, not good, not good….

  • Fri, Feb 06, 2009 - 02:20pm

    #9

    Amanda Witman

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    Re: Adapting In Place

I think there is a time for making expansive changes (relocating, changing jobs, buying useful things, stocking the pantry) and also a time for just making do with what you have.

I’m really glad for people who are able to continue expanding their options, and I hope they appreciate that.  I’m also hopeful that those of us who are "making do" will still be able to get our needs met (and then some).  So much of it is in how you define your needs.  Opening yourself up to more flexible expectations can be very scary for…oh, say, control freaks like myself.  But the benefits are well worth it.

My husband and I started planning about four years ago to pay down debt, fix up our house and sell it, buy land, and build as close to mortgage-free as we could manage.  It was a good plan, and it’s still a good plan, though I feel a little sour that we weren’t able to bring it about already, even with being ahead of the curve.  Our house isn’t ideal.  Our lot isn’t ideal.  Our location has some cons.  We were thinking we had more time before the real estate market tanked, more time to come up with the money for house projects, more time to do the projects, more time to pay down debt, more time to amass savings.  More time to find a chair before the music stopped.

Well, the music stopped when my husband got laid off a month ago.  We are still feeling optimistic and we are not abandoning our land/build plan, but it’s not a possibility at the moment.  At the same time, I’ve shifted my thinking to embrace where we ARE instead of rejecting it in favor of where we would rather be.  It’s a subtle shift and also a really significant one.

I’m doing what I can to focus on the benefits of our current situation, and I’m trying to remember that NO situation is "ideal."  The grass is always greener – "if only we had bought our land, we’d be all set" – but it isn’t that simple.  We don’t really know what the future holds for us (collectively) in terms of practical energy prospects, for example.  We won’t know some things until they unfold.  Sometimes the most prudent thing is to just stay where you are and make the most of it.

I firmly believe that adaptability can be as much or even more a state of mind than a factor of your location.  I remind myself all the time of the pros of our living situation, and try to find ways around the cons.  I always thought of myself as a pessimist by nature, but I’m discovering, to my delight, that I really have quite an amazing capacity for optimism.  The glass is always partially full. Even when it’s completely empty, you still have a glass.

Anytime someone mentions "adapting in place" I think of "making the most of what you already have."  (And that includes your home and possessions, your own creativity and resourcefulness, your life experience and skills, your existing networks and communities).  I think that is going to be a major theme for many or all of us in the coming years – making the most of what we already have.

  • Fri, Feb 06, 2009 - 06:45pm

    #10
    SamLinder

    SamLinder

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    Re: Adapting In Place

[quote=Amanda]

I think there is a time for making expansive changes (relocating, changing jobs, buying useful things, stocking the pantry) and also a time for just making do with what you have.

<snip>

Anytime someone mentions "adapting in place" I think of "making the most of what you already have."  (And that includes your home and possessions, your own creativity and resourcefulness, your life experience and skills, your existing networks and communities).  I think that is going to be a major theme for many or all of us in the coming years – making the most of what we already have.

[/quote]

Hi Amanda,

Your well thought out words speak volumes. When all else is said and done, what counts is family, friends, and community. If you look out at the rest of the world, you will see a myriad of cultures all along the "prosperity curve". While  we may consider our situation as inadequate, other populations will envy our "riches".

Happiness comes not from things but from relationships and community. In the richest of countries and the poorest of countries, those who are the happiest accept their lot in life and enjoy the now. If you look at the lost tribes of the Amazon, they were found to be quite content before "civilization" found them. By our standards, they are desperately poor, yet they are happy in their own world.

I sympathize with your current inability to achieve what you wanted for your family. However, I think you have made a very wise and healthy decision to accept what is for now and to appreciate what you already have. I wish you well and hope that, in the not too distant future, you and your family will once again be able to move forward to obtaining your goal.

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