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    Focus On Making The Dream Happen

    Instead of on all the negativity trying to get in your way
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, July 17, 2020, 5:11 PM

The lush beauty of a midsummer day like today really underscores why my co-founder Chris Martenson and I started Peak Prosperity over a decade ago.

We want to help people live with abundance and be happy. That’s our simple goal.

To succeed, we first have to identify and wrestle with all of the challenges and constraints that stand in the way. An over-indebted economy, peak resources, declining net energy, manipulated markets, deficient leadership, accelerating inequality, decaying infrastructure — to name just a few.

Yes, it can all feel depressing, scary and overwhelming at times.

But sitting in the warm sun next to a fruit-laden apple tree (as I just did moments ago) and taking a moment to appreciate all that nature rewards you with in return for living in harmony with it — beauty, peace, healthy food, fulfilling work, a place to gather with those you love — helps ground us in what’s truly important.

And it reminds us that it’s much more useful to focus on the good we are creating in life, rather than get mired in the negativity we seek to escape. The former inspires us; the latter just saps our will.

As a case in point, after producing this week’s Market Update video (which includes an excellent guest appearance by Joe Saluzzi), I found myself angrily stewing on the abundant and criminally unfair practices the big Wall Street banks use to enjoy obscene profits at our expense. And how in any crisis they’re not only protected, but enriched.

It’s not like any of this was news to me. Or that I, personally, have any agency in changing the banking system.

But nonetheless, my brain rat-holed in anger at those bastard banks until I saw this tweet of Chris’:

Chris nailed it here. If we’re able to secure our own requirements for a happy life, then the rest of the thrash happening in the surrounding world really loses its control over us.

To his credit, Chris set himself the goal last year of finding a very specific type of property to convert into a sustainable, resilient farmstead. He closed on the property in December and has been regularly documenting here at PP.com his prodigious efforts so far in getting the property up and running. (he shares his latest insights here, for those interested)

And as someone who has known Chris closely for over a decade, he’s indeed much less emotionally impacted now by the latest boneheaded Fed policy or sanctioned theft perpetrated by TPTB.

He’s too busy living his intended life to care. There are cows to put to pasture, and garden rows to harvest.

What’s Your Vision?

Chris’ journey raises a great question: What’s your vision?

Where do you want to be, ultimately? And what do you want to be doing when you get there?

Not having a vision but craving a better life is like jumping into a car without a map (or GPS) and randomly driving around, hoping you’ll end up someplace better than where you left. It’s not often a winning strategy.

Even having a defined vision isn’t very useful unless you’re laying out specific goals to bring it into reality, and pursuing them purposefully.

So, what’s your situation? Are you making good progress towards a well-defined objective?

If not, then that’s a clear sign that your process or your vision (or both!) isn’t satisfactorily fleshed out yet. And that’s where you should be placing your mental energies right now.

One Path To Success

If, like Chris, the life you want involves living in a different place than you do now, you need to make time your ally, not your enemy.

The same is true if you want to put your capital to work outside of the Wall Street casino.

In both cases, lots of homework is required to identify and fairly value your options, then acquire and manage what you decide to go with.

Those looking to move should first determine if relocation to a new county/state/country is the best fit for their needs. Helpful resources for folks making that decision are Joel Skousen’s book Strategic Relocation and our podcast on relocation with James Wesley Rawles.

Movers and investors alike will benefit from the hours of expert insights contained inside Peak Prosperity’s excellent educational video series in Real Estate Investing.

Whether you’re looking to find the best value on your next primary residence, or whether you’re interested in owning a tax-advantaged and inflation-adjusting income stream that you control (not the Wall Street sharks), you’ll need to:

  • understand how real estate as an asset class works and its overall economics
  • determine which type of property and what market you want to purchase in
  • get familiar with that niche and start tracking prices and listings to develop an eye for what constitutes good value
  • identify and recruit a good team of expert professionals to help you (e.g., realtor, mortgage lender, accountant, attorney, property manager, syndicator, etc)
  • line up your financing

Here’s a quick taste of the kind of highly practical value the video series offers:

And that was only a 4-minute clip. The full series is 12 hours long. It’s chock-full of additional essential guidance for success.

But all of the above takes time, measured in months (at a minimum) to do well. So get started now.

Fortune Favors The Prepared Mind

As we often emphasize: Your prospects tomorrow will be determined by the actions you take today.

Because of the widespread economic pain caused by the coronavirus, 4.2 million US households failed to pay their mortgages in June. A national downturn in housing prices seems a certainty at this point.

It behooves you to ask yourself how you want to be positioned should home prices indeed drop substantially over the next several years, especially if you are seeking to acquire your “forever” home the way Chris just did.

And if you own property, perhaps you might want to sell now. Or, if you plan to hold, at least mentally prepare yourself for the emotional stress should market values drop for a prolonged period of time.

If you have tenants, you may want to lock in longer leases to ensure you have the necessary income to ride out the down cycle. Or re-finance or re-capitalize as may make sense.

And if you’re interested in using a market correction as an opportunity to buy property at (potentially significantly) better valuations than today, then you should use the time now to become sufficiently educated and prepared.

For those interested, we have compiled and published our excellent 6-part educational video series How To Invest In Real Estate For Safety & Profit into a Vimeo playlist. It’s a hugely helpful resource.

Its first episode (2 hours long), can be watched here for free. If you find value in that, you can purchase the other episodes individually, or purchase the full bundle at a substantial discount.

But the key point is to get started. Your prospects tomorrow will be determined by your actions today. Fortune favors the prepared mind.

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66 Comments

  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 6:05pm

    #1

    Adam Taggart

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 5074

    15+

    Apple tree

    One of the 25+ apple trees currently producing on the property:

    apple tree

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 6:32pm

    #2
    karenf

    karenf

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    Joined: Oct 02 2010

    Posts: 58

    8+

    I too have had moments

    It is nice to hear about your frustration and anger.  I can totally relate and have been there so many times.  The gold and silver price suppression has made me frustrated for years at the greed of the bankers, the complicity of our government and the regulators and my helplessness to do anything.  But in the end, it has just been great practice for me to let go and remember what really matters.  Living each day to the fullest, being grateful for all the wonderful people and abundance in my life is what I need to keep my focus on.  Each day, each year I am getting better at keeping what is most important right in front of me.  I have enough of everything and am on the path you outline in your article.  What else does a person really need?

    Karen

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 6:44pm

    #3
    EddieLarry

    EddieLarry

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    Joined: Jul 04 2020

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    Tree Trimming

    Hi Adam, thank you for the interesting read. I am sitting on my new, re-buit deck and enjoying the sunset.  The old deck was circa 40 years old and had deteriorated recently.  So my vision this spring was to get it re-built.  Now that’s done.  I will have a huge almost 100’ Maple tree in the yard trimmed.  That will come after a short trip to the lake.  Stay well, keep building.

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 6:46pm

    #4
    NickAdams10

    NickAdams10

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    Joined: Feb 05 2015

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    Some help

    Chris and Adam,

    Love these macro-focused posts.

    However, I am a parent, and I need some help with the here and now. What are parents supposed to do with their kids in four weeks? My entire family has been locked down and taking precautions since early March. We've tried so hard to do our part to keep everyone healthy and do what we can to solve the collective problem.

    The school today announced that students are returning in person five days a week. Kids are supposedly wearing masks all day, and any family traveling to a hotspot (whatever that means) has to quarantine for two weeks after that. You know what the vocal parents were upset about? They weren't upset about having in-person classes while this thing spirals out of control; they were upset about having to freaking quarantine after traveling out of state.

    I have no idea what to do in four weeks, but the decision is looming. Any help is appreciated.

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 7:41pm

    #5
    Mohammed Mast

    Mohammed Mast

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: May 17 2017

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    Okay

    Since Granny is not here anymore I will take her place. Are you serious?  Yes we do have a lot to be thankful for. I have friends who are out of work and have been for 4 months. I have a friend who lost his restaurant. I have musician friends who have no place to play to make a living. The list is endless.

    Yeah man wish I had  million to buy a 180 acre farm complete with tractor , sawmill etc. But I don't and Not many do. Those people I mentioned up above don't have enough to buy an apple let alone apple trees.

    I am far better off than most because I started preparing over 50 years ago but I am ever mindful of the real life suffering of people living day to day and not paycheck to paycheck anymore.

    I am grateful for my life but this article just illuminates the gap between those with portfolios and those scraping by.

    Thank you I think I will now go eat my cake.

    This one's for you Granny wherever you are.

     

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 8:06pm

    Adam Taggart

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: May 25 2009

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    Take What You Can & Leave The Rest

    Mohammed -

    Not every post will resonate equally with every reader.

    But the purpose of this post is not to say you need a property Chris' size to find happiness in life.

    Rather, it's to encourage the reader to focus on what they can do vs curse what they can't.  To be grateful for the good they have and to visualize the positive change they want to see in their life and then create actionable goals and momentum towards making that vision reality.

    That advice is just as relevant to those of few means as to those of many. Not sure why you feel the need to castigate such a universal message.

    And, if the resources provided for home searchers/investors bother you -- fine, just skip over those. As we always advise, take from our work what resonates for you and leave the rest. There's no need to sling classist aspersions on those who may find those resources useful.

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 8:15pm

    #7
    cowtown2011

    cowtown2011

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    Stoicism

    Over the last couple years I've found it helpful to read from my Daily Stoic book. Every morning a read a short passage from the book and it helps me focus on what is important. I used to focus and get frustrated with things outside of my control but at the end of the day I was worse off for it. We have limited time and energy on this earth, best to focus on the things we can control and actually influence. I'm enjoyed seeing the all the progress that Chris is making and especially because I'm on a similar path. It's great to be informed of what is going on the world but worrying about does little for anyone. Thanks for the article. We've added some livestock to our property this year, two bee hives, so far they are doing well, it's been a cool summer here in the Rocky Mountains of Southern BC but we are enjoying the lower fire risk and rain. Take care.

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  • Fri, Jul 17, 2020 - 11:02pm

    thatchmo

    Status: Silver Member

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    thatchmo said:

    Apples in Sebastopol?  Who woulda thunk?  Please, tell me they're Gravensteins!  Mouth fully watering.....Aloha, Steve.

    Happy looking pups, as well!

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 12:15am

    PdeB

    PdeB

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    A Guide to the Good Life

    I second that cowtown2011. For those not familiar with Stoicism, check out "A Guide to the Good Life" by William Irvine. Even those of us with modest means can both strive toward a vision and also appreciate what we have.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 12:28am

    #10
    DaveDD

    DaveDD

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    Joined: Sep 08 2019

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    Great post!

    I like this post a lot, especially because there is a deeper layer.

    One could indeed contrast the material situation depicted in it with ones own.  Which could lead to mimetic wants. Lets call that the layer of “mimetic vision”, i.e., the a vision that is not ones own, it mimics the idea, vision and life of others. And indeed, as Mohammed indicated, comparison on this layer will only induce strong emotions like sadness and resentment because of the apparent unfairness.

    Basically this boils down to the question why people suffer. All major religions have answers to this, and interestingly enough, all answers have a similar undertone, although, imo, the way some answers are formulated is somewhat childish, the way we explain things to childeren. Why me, not he? Why she, not me?

    Could it just be that some (not all) of the hands we are dealt have a deeper purpose? Could it be that my life is not about me, but it has to experienced through me? Could it be that my life is part of a grander, inconceivable  reality? For dwellers in the layer of “mimetic vision”, other, deeper, realities, or layers, are non-existent at best, and total rubbish at worst; this cannot be held against then. We all have been there; remember how we perceived the world as childeren? Are childeren therefor stupid? Or do they have to grow and gain experience to increase their awareness?

    The deeper layer in this post is imo that it is a call to remember and realize our own vision, each and every one of us according to our talents and the hands that are dealt to us. We should use our “talents”!

    One last, and for most a very strange remark. Why are we so afraid to suffer and loose? Die we will, but what will be the most comforting: the gold we amassed, or the love we got and gave, and the insights we won? We have been there before, thousands of lives; and still we are here...

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 2:39am

    #11
    planfortomorrow

    planfortomorrow

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    Your turn to drop the mic...

    ... Adam!, Honestly, until now and I apologize in advance I have felt your focus on what is happening in the world and major problems like "POPULATION CONTROL" just takes away from what can realistically be done to make each individual happier and their lives more rewarding by simply changing their own circumstance. If you can build and plant to create the life you want by your own efforts then you win, every day you wake up will be yours to change for the positive and that is my focus. Done are the days I point fingers at the system, I cannot control what the Fed does but, I can take advantage of it when all my cash does is go up! That's still a good thing, yes? I'm not greedy and even if I were I am working within the system before me. The Fed will NOT loss until the Fed loses. I believe we just need to worry only about ourselves.

    Every day since I moved my family into the country and my first 6 acres I have been in control, thankfully too because I will always point the finger at myself first and ask: "what more can I do". Over the last 35 years I have learned from farmers, I know many different food growing practices and have made my mistakes. Hopefully, those years to present has taught me just one thing: an ounce of prevention cures all my troubles".

    I like this Adam, your thread today way more than your over reaching into problems you could never control or make change to so take that as you will. I chose to get my shit done, it pleases me, motivates me, I'm happiest and thankfully I have a partner, My Lady is right there with me singing in the fields as we couldn't be happier. If the shit hits the fan then boy, are we ever prepared. That's the goal. Let go of all the bullshit and turn in some BULL shit, watch your garden grow, the dogs play and roll around a bit with your special someone. That's what life is, a celebration and if you look you have so much more than you could possibly want right in front of you.

    Be good Adam, now just drop the mic and walk away Brother, I get this type of message, well done. Peace BOB

    PS: I too miss Granny, I seen nothing wrong with her point of view, and we wasted an opportunity to allow Granny to be more, over time and to see that others think differently based on their experience. Chris was harsh on her, way to judgmental because she didn't say the things Chris seems to need be said but that's on Chris. Yes, she could make you roll your eyes at times, everyone has that ability. I am absolutely sure I don't comport to everyone's point of view but I could give a shit. Love BOB

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 7:05am

    #12
    VTGothic

    VTGothic

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    Joined: Jan 05 2020

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    Thank you, Adam!

    This post is a great reminder and positive encouragement.

    The reason I finally joined Peak Prosperity after reading the free side for a couple years, and why I take the time to participate in the discussions, is because Adam and Chris have built a site designed to empower readers to engage in the whole virtuous cycle of provisioning and appropriating the goods of life. It is a learning curve, however, that cannot be mastered by reading or talking; it has to be embodied. And the stumbling blocks we each encounter as we act on our desires become opportunities to both learn more and to increase or correct our skills. I gain valuable perspective from this site and from many members of the tribe. I can also share from my lessons here; and sharing, I find, helps me cement for myself my dirty-hands discoveries.

    I'm sure many contributors understand that when we're out doing it there is no hiding whether or not we are hitting our goals. There is no place for pretend self-esteem, but there is abundant opportunity to develop real self-mastery by working through the hardship and knock-down reality that come with the journey of figuring out what works and what does not.

    I think that's what scares some people into inaction. My brother has become a professional seminar participant who takes online course after online course, all of which are marketed as opportunities to learn how to make a good living by building some kind of (usually online) business, but each time he has embarked on the act of making physical his newly acquired knowledge, he has hit some roadblock. Rather than take that as an opportunity to learn and grow, he retreats and takes up another program. “Well, that one wasn't for me,” he says. Meanwhile, he feels frustrated by his failure to hit it big. Also meanwhile, he has developed an impressive set of diverse internet and website skills, which he has not monetized. But I periodically employ him to help me solve a website problem for one or another of the websites I operate so that I can continue to receive the small streams of income I get from them. He is my way through some roadblocks; but he is not his own roadblock destroyer.

    Occasionally I see signs of someone or other who participates on this site the way my brother does on many sites. Each time, I have wished I could somehow encourage them to move from consumer to producer – from someone who is perpetually learning how to do it to someone who does it, however poorly at first.

    The fact is that we all start where we are, with the resources we have on hand. Some of us here look at what we don't have and conclude there is no hope, especially as the hour seems to be growing increasingly late and the costs are big. Others look at what resources we do have, strategize how to capitalize on them, and start taking steps toward manifesting the future we'd like to have. We know we might not get there before trouble comes, but we also believe that however far along the road we do get we'll be better off than if we hadn't started. And as Adam wrote in this post, “fortune favors the prepared mind.”

    A few years ago I read about a guy stuck in an urban neighborhood house who dreamed of one day owning a farm. Chronically under-employed, he had no hope of buying a country place. But what he did do was start farming in his back yard. He converted it into good organic soil, and he sold his produce. Then he asked a neighbor if he could use her back yard, too, in exchange for some of the veggies grown there. She said yes. He kept asking around, many people said yes, and in a few short years he had a thriving organic vegetable business and was on the way to putting aside the money he needed to buy the farm land he wanted.

    Roadblock? What roadblock? I'm confident someone living in an apartment with no attached land could find backyards and fields on which to pursue the same strategy. How much easier for someone living in the suburbs?

    The only real poverty is poverty of imagination. It's a real existential threat to many of us in the First World today because 150 years ago even the poorest among us knew how to grow food, or hunt and trap. Today, well over 80% of us don't know how to eat if we can't find and afford a grocery store. That's one thing PP wants to change. It is: On this site is the knowledge. But as the old saying has it, you can't make a horse drink, even if you put the water right under its nose. Until the horse is thirsty enough, it'll just stand there and look at it.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 9:39am

    GodspeedJesus

    GodspeedJesus

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    Joined: Jul 18 2020

    Posts: 2

    GodspeedJesus said:

    Hi VTGothic! May I suggest Abeka homeschooling? My kid's father and i are divorced, although it was difficult 6 years ago we managed to file an agreed divorce with zero alimomy and zero child support established. Instead we agreed to pay all kid's expenses 50/50 and organize our shcedules for a real 50/50 shared custody. People so often forget that agreeing is way FAIRER than having a judge make the decision for you, which usually ends up being unfair to everyone. Anyway, with that out of the way we brainstormed how to get our preteen kids in a better school environment and how to pay for it. Church friends recommended Abeka 3 years ago and we loved their accredited yet Christian based online videos and books. The next part was how to pay the tuition and we found out that the annual child tax credit from the IRS is more than enough to pay for their school year with enough leftover for their clothes. Their dad takes them to church regularly for socialization with other kids and the local library used to have a homeschoolers social club. The social part can be challenging with coronaviris restrictions but my kids have been thriving and uderstand the limitations. They've adapted beautifully to homeschooling and weren't affected at all by the school lockdowns. I love the schedule flexibility since they can access their classes anywhere in their ipads (another perk of having a non contested divorce, instead of paying attorney fees we were able to buy the kids an ipad each). Their father and i get to pick the books they read for their reading reports which i love. Before coronavirus i would take my kids for trips out of state during low season (huge savings and no crowds) and have fun thanks to the convenience of online learning and sometimes they work hard to finish their assignments sooner to have more time for traveling when other kids would be chained by regular school. They don't miss all the bullying they experienced, long transportation times in school buses nor the useless common core. They are usually done with their daily classes by noon and sometimes they do the next day's worth of classes til around 5 if we have nothing else in the schedule. I am in charge of PE, so i can take them swimming to the YMCA, walking at grrenways and i grade their progress. Abeka has been a blessing to us before covid and now during this covid stuff. At first we were hessitant about homeschooling but we're SO GLAD we jumped into it. I remarried and became a stay at home mom. This loss of my income has had very little impact on my kid's school and i can see them more often. We don't have family relatives or close friends, yet working as a team for the children's sake and their best interest is paying off.  I don't know how old your kids are but if you have family around to keep an eye on the kiddos and make sure they are focusing on their online classes and doing their assignments while you're at work would be great. Btw their website is abeka.com Hope this info helps you!

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 9:45am

    Linda K

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Aug 23 2008

    Posts: 26

    13+

    Linda K said:

    Hey Adam. Pleased to read this post and find it is not just promoting a back-to-the-land romantic scenario. Many variations for securing your future. I'm happy for both you and Chris, being comfortable with your homesteads, but no one should kid themselves that land stewardship isn't a massive amount of hard work. Personally, I spent years trying to decide between a rural and urban life. The last morning I was on the tractor mowing ahead of triple didget heat put an end to the quandary. I'm now in a place I can manage myself, or at least with minimal help. The weather is unlikely to kill me and one apple tree is enough.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 10:10am

    #15
    cicerone

    cicerone

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    Not relocating quite yet

    25+ Apple Trees? Mr. Adam Taggart, those are some resilience goals!

    Relocation isn't happening at the moment for me, so I'm doing my best in my backyard here in San Mateo County, CA. One great thing about this climate is that, like Sonoma County, it's year round gardening. At the moment, I have the following trees: olive, lemon, kumquat, loquat, plum, fig and peach. In raised beds, I grow potatoes, corn, zucchini, spinach, lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, peppers... there's always something fresh.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 11:45am

    Kristin Hedsgrom

    Kristin Hedsgrom

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    Joined: Apr 18 2020

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    Call your district.

    Definitely call your school administrative offices and request a virtual option. I would be shocked if they did not offer your something. I am a teacher and will have to report, but I will be keeping my kids at home. I plan to follow whatever district virtual option I receive for my children until things are safe again. If there is no virtual option there is a homeschool option through Pearson education and others. You can also look into a community school in your area. My sister in law is planning on staying home with her kids and homeschooling a few others in her neighborhood. Do not send your children if you do not think it is safe and please tell your district your opinions.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 11:48am

    #17
    deaconmn

    deaconmn

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    For it is in giving that we receive

    Hello Adam,

    I really enjoyed your article and its emphasis on connecting with the natural environment and finding peace on joy in the midst of an increasingly crazy world.

    I would like to offer one additional way to experience being connected, by helping others. The ministry I'm involved in as a Catholic deacon brings me into contact with a wide variety of people. From those experiencing the loss of a loved one to preparing a young couple for marriage. Through all the tears and smiles, I'm able to be of some assistance, and through the giving of my time, receive much more in return.

    I also serve as president of a local food shelf's board of directors (mainly because no one else wants to step up). Running meetings is not all that exciting, but working with our clients is. This past Thursday, I helped Second Harvest North Country Food Bank distribute boxes of food to our food shelf clients and whomever else showed up. The smiles and thank you's from the people are priceless, and I left knowing I had helped to make a small difference in their life.

    My encouragement to everyone is find an organization serving the poor that could use your help. Whether you end up working directly with the people, packing bags and boxes, or stocking shelves, you will know you're helping someone in need.

    The quote in the subject line is from the Prayer of St Francis

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 1:01pm

    #18
    nordicjack

    nordicjack

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    Joined: Feb 03 2020

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    Easiest simple way to stay focused and not overwhelmed

    Try turning of your phone for a week.  No news no media , nothing.. In fact i wouldn't watch news, politics, virus studies , vaccines etc..   Media is the greatest pollutant when have in society and its productivity.   In fact , I am spending a lot less time here, reading less.  Though, I have pretty much limited it to my only source for virus info and updates etc.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 1:31pm

    cicerone

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    Re: Mohammed Mast

    Adam, everything you said to Mohammed is technically true, but you may have a blind spot in terms of the problems facing low income people. Let's say for example, you're bagging groceries at a natural food market in Berkeley, living in a shoebox in Oakland and also reading PP and wondering what do I do? The front page content on PP seems very much NOT for people like you. Self directed IRAs? Homesteads? Jesus Christ, I can barely make the rent. Why should I care about the Fed?

    As someone who's been in that lowest tax bracket at various times in my life, I would offer the following advice:

    • If you can, move to a lower cost metro. Research things like home prices, crime rate, proximity to farmland, walkability, etc. Pittsburgh, PA is an example of such a metro that has a good balance.
    • If you can't move far for whatever reason, move to a (relatively) safe, boring affordable "gray man" suburb, preferably one that has public transit links so that you have transport alternatives. In the East Bay, Concord would be my choice.
    • Store as much food and water as possible. Grow as much food as feasible on your balcony. Perhaps join the local community garden or sign up for a CSA, farmer's market volunteer, etc. Anything to give you an alternative to the normal supply chain.
    • As much as possible, shed your debt like it's a cancer. Look up Dave Ramsey, Get Rich Slowly, etc. Beware of omnipresent ads telling you need to have a new car/clothes/phone to be worthy . That's how you become a debt slave.
    • Consider learning a trade: electrician, plumber, etc. Blue Collar pride has been on life support but I see it coming back in a big way.

    Those are just a few thoughts that you won't find above the fold on PP but that are very much in line with PP philosophy.

     

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 1:35pm

    planfortomorrow

    planfortomorrow

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    You Sir have not written anything that isn't of the "prepared mind". One of my favorites...

    Gothic, very nice Brother. Down home and real easy, chilled and mellow. I have decided to be a hippy of sorts, goatee, long hair, back to a time I bought into hook, line and sinker. You can sit at our fire anytime. Peace

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 1:45pm

    westcoastjan

    westcoastjan

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    Joined: Jun 04 2012

    Posts: 439

    15+

    AKGranny passes on her thanks

    Granny emailed me to let me know she wanted to thank Mohammed for the comment that referenced her, as well as those who gave it a thumbs up. She would have done so herself but it seems she is no longer allowed to post comments at PP at all. She indicated that she submitted a few comments in the recent past for moderator review & posting but her requests were not acknowledged, much less posted, which was disappointing for her.

    On behalf of Granny, a big THANK YOU for the honourable mention 😉

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 2:53pm

    #22
    Steve

    Steve

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    Are these elderberry plants?

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 3:11pm

    #23
    Steve

    Steve

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    We have been canning from our little victory garden

    From our little 20' X 40' plot in the local community garden.  This doesn't include what we have frozen, eaten and given away!  We have had lots of egg plant parm, fried squash, fried zucchini, fried okra, refrigerator pickles, radishes, and on and on.

    You really do have to stay on top of the okra.  I've seen okra go from pint jar size to a quart jar size overnight!  We are picking it twice per day.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 3:34pm

    Cj Sloane

    Cj Sloane

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    Cj Sloane said:

    They look like Elderberry to me. I've got 10 wild ones on the property but most are red and were hit by frost.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 4:45pm

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Nutritional density?

    glad nutritional density motivates my gardens, fields and farm.

    I am a poor typist and even more poor at much other. Concentrate your gardening on nutritional density.

    Get land! Raise animals that don’t need bought feed! Whose offal and manures feed the edges of your existence!

    husband(keeper of the house) fatherfarmeroptometrist

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 4:50pm

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Nutritional density?

    Post your zone, and I will reply as to what you can grow now that is nutritionally dense. This is for all PP’rs. Our experience might be of help.

    poorandreluctantypist

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 4:50pm

    Adam Taggart

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    Good ideas

    cicerone --

    You lay out good ideas here. Pretty much all of which we often mention in our articles, guides and other resources here at PP.com.

    I'm very happy to see the community engage in what other solutions are out there, for folks of all means. Keep the ideas coming.

    But I'll admit to fatigue of the complaints that we're ignoring the plight of struggling classes. Chris and I make the vast majority of the content we create available to the world for free, including our directive resources like our What Should I Do? Guide, our Wikis -- and we're now giving away our book Prosper! for free, which is packed with actionable guidance for everyone regardless of socioeconomic status.

    We've produced hundreds of articles and podcasts over the past decade on topics similar to the ones you mention like frugal living, debt avoidance, prepping on a shoestring, and resilience skills anyone can afford to develop.

    In my admittedly biased opinion, Chris and I are doing our best to help as many people as we can, as best we know how. Putting out TONS of work for free, highlighting the best solutions we know of, and fostering this wonderful PP community so it can add its collective knowledge to our own and share it in our Forums and comments.

    Look, I realize that too many folks are feeling financially pressed these days. I expect that to worsen from here. I feel for everyone, including those in my own family who are out of work and/or have no income or assets (there are several). So I'm not dismissing the emotional strain.

    But the complainers aren't helping the situation nor are they succeeding at changing Chris' and my outlook.

    If folks want to see more of a specific type of content on this site, let us know -- email us at [email protected] or let us know in the comments or the Forums. Asking is great! We won't guarantee we'll bend to every request, but we'll certainly listen. We want to create the content our audience wants to read most.

    But the reality is the vast majority of folks here at PP.com have at least some wealth they don't want to lose in the coming reset. That may be financial wealth, physical health, valued relationships, purposeful work -- it has many forms. A very large part of our mission is to help folks protect what they value most through the coming changes. No amount of griping is going to divert Chris and me from delivering on that critical mission for so many of our readers.

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 5:34pm

    #28

    000

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    Posts: 130

    1+

    Why, I'm gonna get that wabbit...just you wait and se

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  • Sat, Jul 18, 2020 - 6:13pm

    cicerone

    cicerone

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    We're part of a larger tribe

    Adam,

    Indeed. No complaints here. You guys are generous to a fault! The community is great. As you can see, I'm one of those freeloaders digging through the wikis. So much amazing free information.

    I was just pointing out that IMHO the focus of PP is not slanted towards a modest income crowd and/or people who believe that cities (up to a certain size, anyhow) have a key role in a resilient future.

    I would count myself among the latter. Strong Towns probably best describes my viewpoint. But there's so much overlap among the various resilience tribes, I don't see any point in drawing borders. I try to listen and learn and challenge my own biases and that's why I lurk on PP from time to time. Hope y'all don't mind!

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 5:43am

    Rector

    Status: Bronze Member

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    9+

    Thanks for that

    MM,

    That was a compelling contribution.  What exactly should the tone of each article be like in your opinion?  Should Chris and Adam only write inside that perspective?  Does it require $1m to live on a homestead?  Was that the point?  You might consider reading the first bit of a post, deciding you're not interested, and moving on to something else - rather than scolding the author.  That usually what I do when you post - but today I thought you might like to see what it's like.  Change your thought processes and posts to accommodate my opinions.

    Rector

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 6:27am

    Steve

    Steve

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    Zone 9a

    Zone 9a.  coastal south Georgia.  My summer garden is finishing and we are pulling up plants and getting it ready to seed buckwheat for the Sept/Oct planting.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 6:30am

    #32
    kunga

    kunga

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    2+

    Chris Martenson interview

    Now posted at Greg Hunter's. usawatchdog.com

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 7:44am

    lmcdel

    lmcdel

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    Posts: 22

    Zone 6a

    I welcome any thoughts on my higher elevation zone.

    thanks!

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 8:30am

    #34

    000

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    Joined: Dec 10 2013

    Posts: 130

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    Still got into an argument

    I also really appreciate the personal report from Adam.

    I don't know how to have difficult conversations and not end-up in an argument about how negative I am and unsupportive of a positive attitude. Are there any other married persons here with this predicament? Be positive about the negative? How do I even get folks beyond reading the real estate listings and the cross-word puzzle? I read that the nice country people hate city people invading their piece of heaven with their city ways. Spouses think this is all a come on selling financial advise.

    Frustrated (self-pity close behind)

    Hey! buddy. Can you spare a dime?

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 8:42am

    Oliveoilguy

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    Joined: Jun 29 2012

    Posts: 753

    Nutritional Density

    Hi Robie,

    We are in Zone 8a.....Interested in your thoughts. Be well my friend!

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 8:49am

    timot78

    timot78

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    Posts: 37

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    PP Audience's Interests (facts are facts)

    A simple search of PP site analytics reveals the following:

     

     

     

    Source: https://www.similarweb.com/website/peakprosperity.com/

    Social Issues, as demanded by some here , are NOT what the mainstream of PP's Audience is coming for.  However, theautomaticearth.com website is the 3rd most frequently visited website, according to the stats.  As Adam mentions, PP provides plenty of free value-loaded content. The recent series of Chris on CV-19 included.  But the reality is, the core audience comes for that + Finance/Investing issues, such as Dave F.'s mkt analysis, interviews with Mkt experts , etc.   If one wants for the website to be successful and income-producing, one has to cater to the audience.  Meanwhile, the messages are positive and geared toward Resilience.   What else can you ask for - if you are part of the profiled Audience?

     

     

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 9:16am

    Oliveoilguy

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Jun 29 2012

    Posts: 753

    7+

    Audience Interests

    Hi Timot,

    I wonder when that survey was done? Was it pre-covid? My anecdotal input is that Covid was much more important to the PP population than finance during the last 5 months. Also ...I believe PP viewership grew exponentially during that period....again due to Covid. Finance and homesteading is what brought me to PP many years ago, and I think we all agree on the inevitable collapse.....just don’t know the timing. Covid is the game changer and threads like Jims HCQ.....and Sandpuppy ...Dr. Mayer ....and Island Girl on the origin of the disease is drawing 100% of my interest right now. And I don’t miss a video by Chris on Covid. It’s kinda like my life depends on it.

    Anecdotal? Yes.....just like Dr. Zelenko ....Maybe some value ????

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 9:30am

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    zone 8a

    You've discovered sweet 'taters, they grow well in your area and will keep all winter into the next harvest (store them under your couch)and have great nutritional density. Cow peas will add huge amounts of OM and Nitrogen. they too are nutritionally dense and can be dried (easy storage) canned(makes wonderful humus) or frozen fresh (better if blanched but pretty good if time/fuel constraints send them straight to the freezer) Millets and sorghum are  drought tolerant grains. easy to grow both but are very much appreciated by birds as they dry and weavils and mice during storage. I make a delicious flat bread with ground brown top millet and/or sorghum.

    you are in a good area for most every thing if you can get the water. I have grown collards year round in south Ga. (Cairo, Ga) zone 9a, but water was seldom an issue. I have collards that are harvestable now in July southside Va. they will bolt once they go thru a vernal cycle.

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 9:40am

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 1019

    zone 9A

    Almost home! we grew up west of you off hwy 84. My partner for life and I are VSC now VSU alumni.

    unless you are hung up on buckwheat,broadcast some pea seed, purple hull or cream 8 or crowder any cow pea. they will create as much OM as buckwheat (plant them thick) and fix alotta nitrogen. Could be turned in to feed you cole crops this winter.

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 10:07am

    #40
    Chris Martenson

    Chris Martenson

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    Joined: Jun 07 2007

    Posts: 5219

    9+

    In other news...

    In other news, Mememonkey was spotted recently at a protest:

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 10:16am

    #41
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Zone 6a

    elevation? Rocky? Mid west? New England? Immediately start asparagus and rhubarb. Some Chestnuts as well. I have had some experience in Allegheny county,NY. I imagine you could grow most anything. Never had luck with okra, eggplant, or sweet potatoes. Season was too short. The best cabbage, best storing brassica, and Irish potatoes ever!

    find some chestnuts this fall. Put them in a bucket of loose sand in your crawl space. Dump them out in May and plant, tube, and stake them. The best pasta I have ever had was made from chestnut flour. Yes, flour can be made from chestnuts and it is slitely sweet with a lite undertone of vanilla and nutmeg.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 10:21am

    VTGothic

    VTGothic

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    Excellent Interview

    This is a great interview, an easy introduction to Chris and PP that I can share around my circle.

    Steering Towards a Cliff Edge – Chris Martenson

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 10:22am

    Oliveoilguy

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Jun 29 2012

    Posts: 753

    2+

    Butternut

    Robie....I assume butternut falls in the nutritionally dense category....is that right? It is the easiest and most prolific crop that we grow. I just harvested about 300 lbs. off of 40 vines.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 10:56am

    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    Joined: Feb 19 2016

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    harvesting now

    What I am harvesting now is magenta spreen lambsquarters and zuchinni just started being ready, and I harvested alot of potatoes last month that I am of course still eating.  Onions are almost done.  But, we had late freezes, and a fair amount of cold nights after, so no tomatoes, peppers ripe yet.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 11:35am

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Butternut

    has similar nutritional profile to sweet potatoes. Both are also long keepers. Both will grow well in your area.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 11:40am

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 1019

    Could you grow olives?I

    I would love to be able to grow olives. Also nuts trees. I am a chestnut fan as they are productive sooner than most and more consistent than most as well. You and OOG could also grow pecans. Swipe some first fall nuts from a neighbor and start your own. A cistern and a green house/ high tunnel would help with predation also shade clothe over either seasonally.

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 1:02pm

    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Feb 19 2016

    Posts: 308

    3+

    olives and nuts

    I can never harvest nuts, seriously, never, due to squirrels.  I have chestnut and hazelnut trees and a large, wild black walnut, I get no nuts ( and the time or two I raced to get a few black walnuts, they were wormy, and that tree has a canopy the size of a suburban backyard, so it is not getting sprayed).  I am going to plant a few chestnuts from my neighbors larger, eastern chestnut to wild areas and see what happens. I may start killing squirrels, chickens will eat anything

     

    I have 2 arbequina olive trees, yes, you can grow olives here.  But, it turns out the olives are very small because they are not irrigated, and they barely get ripe before the freeze comes, that was last year, the first year of enough olives to pick a jar full, we will see this year how they ripen.  I was under the mistaken impression that they would yield without irrigation. Getting fats in some way is important.

     

    So, were you meaning just perrenials when you mentioned nutrient dense crops ?  The other perennials that do well with no irrigation and I can get my share are apple, pear, plum, persimmon, mulberry trees, grape vines, nopales cactus( the cactus is not what I would call nutrient dense)  and the invasive himalayan blackberries.

     

    I do not have the money or energy to cover my entire garden, sometimes I do places on it.   I swear the crows know that my putting a cover on the bed means there is something good underneath, so they rip thru the floating row cover to get it !  This year, I was able to trick them a bit.

     

    It is a challenge, but some things they leave alone, and I do more of that.  They do not eat potato plants, for example.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 2:07pm

    #48
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    nutrient dense?

    There are many nutrient dense crops, however, your plague seems to be the critters that predate your crops.. An axiom I use is, "if can't farm it feed it". Johnsongrass is one of those pests many farmers fight,now, I have learned if I graze cattle and sheep for a full season (put and take)the johnsongrass isn't an issuefor a few years(the ruminants love johnson grass. Don't fight Mama Nature, learn to eat her and enjoy Her blessings.

    husbandfatherfarmeroptomestrist ( midlotopia Va.)

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 2:13pm

    #49
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 1019

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    OBTW

    Pie plates work for a crow distraction, at least till my millet gets above their pulling.

    This is an issue I am dealing with at this moment!

    you need to taste what cane sorghum pressed and reduced, then fermented and run thru a d!st!llat!on unit has in store for a few mint leaves and ice. Oh My! the '68 ford can run on it.

     

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 4:42pm

    Mr Curious

    Mr Curious

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    Posts: 78

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    I know what you mean

    @ Okay:  Let me first say that I am fan of Chris Martenson, even though I don't blog that much here. I had my middle school kids watch the crash course back in the day. I've bought one of the books, watched interviews over the years, and took the recent brace yourself post very seriously. Not to mention the great work on the virus education. However, you make a good point. There is a 'let them get a farm' feel to the whole 180 acre thing.

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  • Sun, Jul 19, 2020 - 10:11pm

    #51
    2retired

    2retired

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    Joined: Jul 20 2020

    Posts: 11

    5+

    apples

    One strategy for apples is to have varieties that ripen in sequential months; my grandparents orchard (which my sister allows me visiting/occasional predation rights) has 25 ancient trees that ripen sequentially in months from early June til November and frost/snow. It keeps a constant supply of fresh apples (at lower volumes) with the last variety to ripen, staying fresh for months.

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  • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 2:37am

    planfortomorrow

    planfortomorrow

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    Joined: Dec 28 2017

    Posts: 121

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    planfortomorrow said:

    Hilarious!!!

     

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  • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 4:42am

    planfortomorrow

    planfortomorrow

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    Joined: Dec 28 2017

    Posts: 121

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    planfortomorrow said:

    Adam, we are all here, pay our dues ($30 is not enough for what you both have given us) to show loudly our support for YOU and CHRIS. You both are of high character and are appreciated. I seldom read anything that first doesn't start with a thank you, a compliment our in admiration of you both with Charles. You have to take these comments deeper into your soul, to not just glance and move on but to internalize and let these very kind words resonate with you and drive you happily along while doing your work here. They are real compliments of approval and a direct positive to your works. Hear everyone Adam, read everyone with an open heart as they come from a very diverse group who are trying to figure everything out. I wish you well always so let that resonate with you more than some of my content. Just throw away the content you don't like and insert that I am here, still learning and appreciative of so many things this site offers.

    In 12 years I have learned so much from everyone that words could never express my appreciation. Be Good Brother, you are family of sort and in any family we do have issues but we have forgiveness too and understanding and pro's, con's and major differences of opinion. Hell, some Folks just get under your/my skin but, let it go. It's never properly understood by either party anyways. Sometimes we just had a bad day and said things not meant to be harmful but on that day it did, maybe great harm but, it isn't irreparable, we just need to hear all the good stuff too and feel good about what we are doing just because it is good and is the only assurance we need really. Self conviction. Let the BS go and feel the kindness expressed instead. In no way can we, any of us, express in words who we truly are as humans. What I see is a support group of like minded Folks, some write beautiful essays and others terrific history lessons and others give sound medical opinions. Some just bitch of their plight because they want to do so many things and can't go fast enough because of the cash situation. Ever instance is personal and different. You just have to have HOPE for them that they figure these pressing issues out. I personally enjoy the people like Gothic who has a writing style that shows me he has a boundless vocabulary, and this is so cool to me. Others like Dave are so complete in his knowledge of everything, so forth and so on.

    This site is your creation and you should feel very good about your feelings of giving back. It is excellence at its best so Pops gave you the tools you now bless us with. Feel great about those who supported you so that you could support us, you obviously took your gifts and centered it on a righteous cause and we all appreciate it. Glad you're here. Peace BOB

    PS: why 25 or so apple trees? Do you have an affinity for apple pie, strudel and any other apple filling type foods?! LOL...lots and lots of apples but, can't live on apples. Just funnin' but, seriously, why so many apples. Barb and I picked cherry's as they are just now ripened on the vine in Traverse City not far from us.. With our friends we picked, de-pitted and made so many jars of jelly and pie fillings. We love doing this but it is a mess and very time consuming but one rather large shelf is stacked top to bottom and right to left and deep into our shelf. Certainly enough for the year and Christmas gifts. Everyone loves our jelly and pie fillings. These Folks we gift also help us take care of some of our work when they visit. My Sister and her husband came up for a visit while we were doing our cherry's so they split a cord and a half of wood while we finished up. They got their Thanksgiving cherry pie filling and strawberry jelly for their efforts. It was a fair exchange, all were happy. Next week we preserve corn (if ready, should be and we learn if our first attempt at preserving corn is successful), spinach and a lot of absolutely beautiful beats in our garden. The beets are the best we have grown. Onions, garlic and tomatoes are ready too so these will begin to be preserved or laid out in the garden to dry. Potatoes are ready so will come out of the garden as well. I love the weekends now because we begin to really fill the pantry.

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  • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 12:27pm

    #54

    000

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Dec 10 2013

    Posts: 130

    1+

    Food Forests for Fun and Food

    What is a Food Forest? (And How to Get Started)

    This one for the East Coasters:

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  • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 1:29pm

    000

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Dec 10 2013

    Posts: 130

    5+

    Happiness is a dream worth having

    I'm with you bro, I walk up eight ave past Penn Station these days and let me tell you, it's bad, people are suffering, seventies bad. But a million dollars is just middle class these days and not even, in the city you can't buy a studio apt for that--yet. I was prepared for 2008, got killed in 2011, and eventually  aged-out for the last 10 yrs (not good).  In the end as aware as one may be of class inequity and its "fragility", Chris and Adam have been transparently working to bring information and practice to us, for all to see (big gratitude) I would leave to others the "insight" into what PP readers want [snicker] Social issues are more an object of reference here in relation to how one can read the signs and make it better for oneself and/or family and community.

    If McPherson is right there is precious little time to be happy, to share happiness, and live happily in service to others. It takes courage for me to leave my own bull' behind and focus on my dream. (oh shit! I can have a dream?!) (not while He was around, yeah, major inner healing work requires courage too)

    So, Who's on first...

    Here is what you can grow in a 480 sq apt with two people:

    window farm

    Food Window: tomatoes, lettuce, watercress, ginger, turmeric and mint

    Rosemary basil parsley and thyme

    Rosemary basil parsley and thyme

     

     

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  • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 1:41pm

    #56
    mmckay

    mmckay

    Status: Member

    Joined: Mar 19 2020

    Posts: 2

    11+

    Make the good from the bad

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I was born infertile.  But, my wife and I adopted 5 Asian kids over the years, and now have an amazing family, including five grandkids.  My wife, a marathoner got a neuromuscular disease five years ago.  She, rather than wallow in pity, has deepened her connection to God through prayer, and study.  She is, in my humble opinion, the strongest woman I know.  I am proud of her and she shows others every day how to handle the twists and turns that God gives us.

    We can choose how to "do life", because we all have tragedy, and craziness along the way.  For our family, we choose faith, family, and a microhomestead.

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  • Tue, Jul 21, 2020 - 7:25am

    000

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Dec 10 2013

    Posts: 130

    PP Plus Plan

    Good stuff. PP can't do it all.  Reference a recent update from Dr. Gary Null on getting off the grid. He's been doing this sort of reporting (and practice) longer that even PP and the pdf he offers is chuck full of city, state, and country lists with those statistics.

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  • Tue, Jul 21, 2020 - 7:54am

    #58

    dcm

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Apr 14 2009

    Posts: 129

    5+

    Chris and Adam

    Despite the criticism, I would bet that if everyone with financial success and talent would share their thoughts the way these guys did, the world would look a little better

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  • Tue, Jul 21, 2020 - 7:55am

    lmcdel

    lmcdel

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jul 12 2012

    Posts: 22

    lmcdel said:

    OK, I messed up - I am actually 6b. Should have double-checked. I'm in the CO Rockies, elevation 5700. Do these suggestions still apply? Mmmm.... the chestnut flour sounds delicious. Not aware of many nuts being grown around here.  Thanks!

     

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  • Tue, Jul 21, 2020 - 9:03pm

    #60

    dtrammel

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: May 03 2011

    Posts: 801

    7+

    What Lies Ahead

    This seems like a pretty good estimate of the problems we are facing over the next few years, and the probable outcomes, which aren't going to be good for anyone.

    https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/07/20/what-lies-ahead-2/

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  • Wed, Jul 22, 2020 - 2:12am

    planfortomorrow

    planfortomorrow

    Status: Member

    Joined: Dec 28 2017

    Posts: 121

    1+

    planfortomorrow said:

    Tram, thanks for this. Some heavy reading as it laid out very serious outcomes that are sure to happen and anyone of these happenings could flip this economy into some serious outcomes. My, my, my. I wish you well. BOB

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  • Wed, Jul 22, 2020 - 6:54am

    #62
    Penguin Will

    Penguin Will

    Status: Member

    Joined: Aug 20 2019

    Posts: 40

    11+

    Penguin Will said:

    Being offline for a few weeks (painting the house) lets you discover some gems (like this post) waiting on you when you get back into things. Really nice to see that Chris and Adam have made such good progress. As Karen noted: It is a lot of work.

    I'm jealous of the apples! I have two groups of apple trees on my place, one that came with the farm which were mostly chosen for eating and the other, mostly young ones, which I planted and are mostly for cider making... but also great eating. And I haven't got one single apple on any of them. I'm not sure if it was the two snows in April or the dozen or so late frosts that did them in. What I do know is there probably isn't an apple within 50 miles of this section of the Allegheny Highlands. Nor are there cherries. Or peaches. Or pears.

    Sometimes that is life at 3000' elevation. 🙂

    About the applicability of showing your wonderful new homestead to a group where a lot cannot make it happen. I congratulate you both and thank you for showing us your progress. Sometimes it hurts to see others grasping a dream that we ourselves have chased for so long... without getting it in hand. For myself only, I know that sometimes the dream becomes a bit more humble by necessity. When that happened, I know it never made the dream any less dream worthy.

    But it did finally happen for me. How?

    I kept a small portion of my powder dry. Way back in the day when my I had nary a gray hair or ounce of fat on my body I had the dream of owning a small farm somewhere around my hometown in the hills. So the very first job after college I saved up a chunk for my PhD and another for the farm. The first chunk went away quickly as I made it through  school but I never touched the other. It was a grand total of $75 a week for just over two years. All in company stock.

    After grad school I ended up working in NC, then Chicago, then finally Minnesota over the next 16 years. And then my chance came. The family farm came available (with no family discount mind you) and I got my dream job within easy driving of it. That little chunk of money was now $60,000. I had sold it all and re-bought it all twice in that time. I knew my old company and I knew the business. Market timing is a once in a thousand shot but it worked. Twice. I still have a mortgage but it is manageable and not terribly large.

    In short it took some luck to get me and my family on this place. More than I would like to admit. But there was also a lot of work. Biggest thing, I believe is the long term commitment to that dream and sharing you life with someone who shares it. Sometimes these things don't happen fast. A lot of times they don't happen at all. There is no one size fits all method to owning your dream homestead. Keep the faith in the dream and don't be afraid to buy in totally for a downsized version of it. That's my advice.

    The rewards? Sitting on my front porch looking over the fields that my great-great-great grandfather cleared. Hoping that all of those old mountain men can see their old place and approve of the job I am doing in keeping it productive.

    Will

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  • Wed, Jul 22, 2020 - 7:23am

    #63

    dtrammel

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: May 03 2011

    Posts: 801

    2+

    Thanks Bob

    Yeah I knew things were bad but not just how many boulders are lined up in the cliff above us. That article really puts it in perceptive.

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  • Wed, Jul 22, 2020 - 12:04pm

    thesecuritygirl

    thesecuritygirl

    Status: Member

    Joined: Mar 23 2020

    Posts: 33

    thesecuritygirl said:

    10a

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  • Wed, Jul 22, 2020 - 12:08pm

    #65
    Steven Kelso

    Steven Kelso

    Status: Member

    Joined: Aug 22 2018

    Posts: 25

    2+

    More of This

    I found the Peak Prosperity tribe because of Damon Vrabel.
    I encourage folks to watch his Renaissance 2.0 presentation, still available on YT.
    Specifically, Lesson 4: The Culture of Empire
    In this lesson, Damon refers to narcissism and power-based relationships and the emotional toll that financial dictatorship takes on human and non-human life. He posits that this system perverts our natural value systems, away from the natural world and empathy for others.

    I'm looking forward to the next edition of The Crash Course and I intend to buy copies and gift them to the folks I love. I have a small request, Chris and Adam: please include a chapter that focuses on this emotional toll and how we can learn to see things with our own eyes, with attitudes of gratitude. This post was a breath of fresh air.

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  • Wed, Jul 22, 2020 - 5:57pm

    planfortomorrow

    planfortomorrow

    Status: Member

    Joined: Dec 28 2017

    Posts: 121

    planfortomorrow said:

    YEP! Depressing. It's going to be interesting. I need until next Aug (?) and the end to 12 years of a piece here, piece there and then the final piece, our last home. Be well...BOB

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