• Blog

    Falling Through The Cracks

    The poverty crisis is hitting home
    by Adam Taggart

    Wednesday, January 15, 2020, 5:51 PM

In the trailer for our recent (and excellent) webinar WTF: What The Fed?!?, I ask:

What’s it going to take for the pitchforks to come out? How much more does the common man need to be abused before he wakes up and says ‘I’m not going to take anymore!’?

As discussed in detail in the webinar, our economic and political systems have been captured by monied interests. Industry, government, markets and the judicial system all work for their benefit, not ours.

The result? An acceleration of wealth and opportunity away from the masses and into the pockets of the top 1% (really, the top 0.1%)

The public is literally being sacrificed so that a tiny number of powerful elites can enjoy “more”.

Today, I’m not going to make my point with my usual onslaught of charts and data. Instead, I’m going to make it visually.

We’ve all read the articles about the dying middle class and the explosion of homelessness in recent years.

Well, I live in northern California, in Sonoma County, about an hour north of San Francisco. It’s quite pleasant up here, with lots of small farms, orchards and vineyards.

Yes, there are some rich folks here. But nothing like the rest of the Bay Area. Most families are working class.

The local economy is nothing like the Tech frenzy of Silicon Valley. But it’s better than most places in the country.

At least, it has been.

Recently, it’s become impossible not to see the signs that more and more people are falling into poverty. They just can’t afford the rising cost of living, even if they have a job.

Here where I live, nowhere is this more apparent than the Joe Rodota trail connecting my small town of Sebastopol with the nearby city of Santa Rosa. Over the past year, this previously quiet, clean, bike & pedestrian route has exploded into a sprawling homeless encampment for hundreds of dispossessed people.

Here’s a 2-minute video I took of the encampment this afternoon (h/t to my daughter Charlotte for manning the camera as I drove):

YouTube is full of similar shocking video of much larger encampments across the West Coast, from Los Angeles to Seattle. Here in the Bay Area, even our “jewel” cities of San Francisco and Berkeley are becoming overrun by an exploding homeless problem and the mental health, sanitation, addiction, safety and crime issues associated with it.

It’s a major issue with no clear fix in sight. And folks, it’s only going to get worse. Far worse.

Remember, we’re in the 11th year of the longest economic expansion in US history. The markets are at record highs. The official reported unemployment rate is at a record low.

When the next recession hits it will be like pouring jet fuel on this fire.

Homelessness in California has doubled in just the past few years and our social support systems are already overwhelmed. What’s it going to be like if mass layoffs cause the homeless population to quadruple in a single year?

I remain amazed at how difficult life is for the millions of working poor in America. What harsh conditions they suffer just to hold a job, sleep under (any) shelter, find food, and wake up the next day to do it all over again. Day after day, always worried that sickness, injury, misfortune or theft is going to jeopardize the little you have.

Once you’ve dropped into poverty, especially if you have family dependents, it is damn hard to extricate yourself from it. Regardless of how hard you apply yourself.

If you have the time, I recommend watching this 45-minute documentary on US poverty produced by a German public broadcast service. Currently more than 40 million Americans live beneath the poverty line — that’s twice as many as in 1970.

Viewing our country through their outsider’s eye is a stark warning that we ignore this metastasizing  social epidemic at our peril:

Back to my question at the start of this post: What’s it going to take?

How many more millions will fall into poverty? How much more abuse will continue until of those of us paying attention, with growing fear at the social implications and perhaps at our own financial vulnerability, actively revolt against the elite-centric status quo?

For thousands of years, history has warned us that such social imbalance will not stand:

Are we going to listen in time?

Related content
» More

68 Comments

  • Wed, Jan 15, 2020 - 9:28pm

    #1
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 331

    3+

    Modern Hoovervilles

    A few similarities, apart from the quality of the building materials.

    Yes, it’s all so sad and so unnecessary. And it wouldn’t take much for parts of Australia to start looking rather similar. Our housing market is a splendid bubble just now. Maybe the fires will trigger something: more than a few homeowners were underinsured, or not insured at all owing to the cost of premiums.

    Meanwhile, the 0.1% might look at this video and see all the (industrious, self-reliant, entrepreneurial) people who aren’t homeless. There’s plenty of work out there, just waiting for someone to do it. At least, that’s what our Dickensian PM tells us.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 12:42am

    #2
    Rodster

    Rodster

    Status: Member

    Joined: Aug 22 2016

    Posts: 42

    5+

    If You Remove All The Phony Data And...

    Such as the unemployment numbers, or inflation figures. If you remove ALL the expanded, Government programs such as food stamps or government assistance, it would look just like a DEPRESSION. You don’t have to know a damn thing about economics or finance and that’s really what we entered in 2008-09.

    Just look at the TRILLIONS of dollars The Fed has created out of thin air and it’s barely moved the growth needle. Take away those trillions of dollars and I have NO doubt you would see negative growth. Why? Because wage disparity has been going on for decades. It’s why we have 6-7 yr car loans. Most jobs are low wage. you can’t support a family with it.

    I ran into a young mom who was working a a SW Florida Marshall’s store and she quit because she was being paid less than $9 an hour and working less than 15 hrs a week and her employer demands a flexible schedule (in their favor). So she quit and went to work at Walmart which doesn’t much more but shes now working 40 hrs.

    I have seen my far share of homeless people. I live on a man made island and while walking to the beach one early morning, getting my exercise. I walked to the back of the beach bathhouse and there were several homeless people quietly sleeping.

    The other day I stopped by my local Walmart and there were two individuals sleeping under a tree and another man sleeping on the sidewalk of the parking lot. They both setup temporary beds. IMO, homelessness is a lot more of a problem than we will want to admit.

    Onto Adam’s comment regarding pitchforks. Gerald Celente, founder of the Trends Journal (hopefully Chris can interview him one day) has the best quote regarding pitchforks. He says:when people lose everything and have nothing else to Lose…..They Lose It !

    That day of reckoning is approaching. It’s why he has coined the phrase The New World Disorder with all the civil unrest going on around the world because people are starting to get angry over the growing wage disparity.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 12:50am

    #3
    Sparky1

    Sparky1

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jul 21 2016

    Posts: 572

    18+

    Adam, thank you (through the tears....)

    Adam, thank you so much for your very thoughtful and timely article and video posts.  Your video of the homeless encampments along the highway mirror those I witness daily within my community and commute. And it breaks my heart. :-/

    I’ve viewed the documentary re: the homeless in America a few times prior to your posting and yet it never fails to move and disturb.  Even still, it brings me to tears. Consider that one bout unemployment, illness or misfortune:  there but for the grace of God go I. 

    I see more and more strangers, acquaintances, friends and family struggling daily–“cutting back” significantly (sometimes surgically) but still attributing their “failures” to themselves without understanding how the monetary system contributes to their demise. Society by and large also places the blame at the feet of the working poor and to laziness, mental illness, and drug addiction. I do my conscious best to anticipate and navigate this twisted system of income inequality, and to help myself,  loved ones and strangers to survive and prevail even one more day against the growing odds against them.

    I stockpile and carry foodstuffs, water and personal supplies in my home and car to distribute to those in need, and make regular drops to local charities serving the homeless. But honestly, I fear that it is a losing battle. Homelessness is not just a US West Coast problem, but is every where, world wide.  The homeless “situation” is very, very, very  bad and will undoubtedly get worse as this corrupt global system unravels and/or explodes/implodes.

    I remind myself that whatever I do to help (even temporarily) each failing starfish washed ashore in this tumultuous storm is arguably insignificant, but still matters at the very least to that particular starfish:  day by day, minute by minute, soul by soul. Wearily, I still keep on, keeping on. But truthfully, I am often tired and deeply discouraged.

    Your article is personally very timely.   I continuously ask myself, “What did I know”, “When did I know it?”, and “What did I do about it?” Ultimately, I know I can do more. I am determined to accelerate my efforts with renewed energy and purpose, even while doing my level best not to personally succumb to the powerful and insidious forces that conspire to undermine my honest efforts.

    I’m inspired and enlightened through PP conversations of expansive (hard-earned) land holdings, traditional and alternative energy inputs and outputs and stock “”markets”” catalysts, mechanisms  and performance.

    However, while interesting and educational, I find these have little direct impact upon the day-to-day reality I witness and experience as a struggling middle/working class single parent of three adult, college-age  children in a mid-sized mixed community. For better or worse, with my urban permaculture farmstead I choose to remain here to support and defend my adult children and grandchildren.

    I have grave misgivings as to how we’ll  fare on the other side of the reset, but I will take comfort in knowing that I will have done all possible to support my loved ones and those less prepared/fortunate during and after the transition.

    This may be a somewhat different mindset than that of secure individuals well-prepared to capitalize on the other side of the inevitable, historic reset/wealth transfer. Many of us less fortunate know we’re being continuously robbed and will be possibly decimated in the “wealth transfer” inevitably to come.

    Bottom line is that debt is dramatically increasing more rapidly than income/personal or sovereign GDP. The rich are getting obscenely richer while the middle class/poor are becoming poorer. We are becoming a nation and world of debt slaves to the 1% and .001%  wealth holders/MIC criminals.

    I don’t know for certain how this reset/transformation will end, but I am certain that there’s a whole lot of pain and loss in what lies ahead. Personally, I am determined to mitigate that pain and loss to the extent humanly possible.

    Consider that the growing homeless population are the canaries in the coal mines portending the demise of a failed debt-based feudal monetary system that enslaves generations to the will and whims of the incestuously co-joined Military Industrial Complex (MIC),  the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) and the Federal Reserve/Central Banks and their multi-national governmental/corporate co-conspirators and beneficiaries.

    I honestly don’t know where this will lead us. But with God as my witness, my (permaculture) roots are firmly anchored in the ground determined to weather the storms ahead and to grow fruitful harvests despite climatic, geopolitical and economic uncertainty and upheaval.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 1:47am

    #4

    sand_puppy

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 2143

    14+

    We don't know who to lynch

    We know that the problem is “the banks.”  But when I go into Wells Fargo and look closely at the teller, I don’t see any kind of evil person.  Just an earnest young person getting started in a job, hoping to build a career, striving to be helpful.

    Similarly, I would be glad to burn down a bank, but the branch on my street is just a cheap building and its demise would not improve the world a bit.

    The people, the super-wealthy, are masked from view behind corporate ownership.

    Who owns Wells Fargo?

    When a predatory home loan goes bad and a little old lady is evicted from her home by the local sheriff, are we going to take it out on the sheriff?    Again, look closely at the sheriff and we see a very normal working class person, often one with integrity.  Nothing evil in the eyes of the sheriff.

    Who do you lynch?  What do you burn?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 3:58am

    #5
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 932

    5+

    Lynch those...

    …who passed laws and ordinances allowing the .01% to gain undo favor?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 5:29am

    #6
    vlierheimer

    vlierheimer

    Status: Member

    Joined: Feb 22 2019

    Posts: 10

    1+

    This really bugs me so

    I started a business in Southern Colorado to take a swing at this problem. It’s thriving. Any joiners?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 5:35am

    #7
    macro2682

    macro2682

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Sep 03 2009

    Posts: 344

    3+

    I agree that this is a depression of sorts...

    The Great Depression was “great” because it was an experience shared by a large percentage of the population.  Everyone could see it, feel it, and relate to it,…they were all part of it.

    Today is different because the pain isn’t distributed evenly, and the information is individualized.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 5:41am

    #8

    Quercus bicolor

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 318

    2+

    Income inequality

    Originally posted by me in The One Good Thing About the Fed.

    New material for this thread: Perhaps many of those tents are occupied by people in the 2nd or 3rd quintile, people with kids and the expenses that come with them being squeezed between falling real income and soaring housing costs.  In our small city in upstate NY, there are no tent cities, and definitely fewer homeless, but the cold winters force people to seek other more sheltered options (doubling up, shelters) or to leave for warmer climes.

    Here’s the original post:

    Chris,  Your income inequality section (in the original piece) inspired me to do some research and I found this Wikipedia article.  Lots of the data is from the congressional budget office.  If you piece together the various charts, you can reconstruct values for various subgroups of the top quintile (80-90%, 90-95%, 95-99%, 99-99.9% and the top 0.1% and 0.01%).  It also shows the same values, but after taxes and government transfer payments. Here is a bar plot made from the table in the article.  The top 0.1% and 0.01% values are estimates from a chart near the beginning of the article that had different reference years.

    Several things I noticed:

    1. The trend has more-or-less leveled off over the past 5 years at least and more like 10.
    2. When taxes and transfer payments are accounted for, the poor have done slightly better than average.
    3. The middle class (21st-80th percentiles) have been the big losers.  Since this represents many families, it is probably an important factor in the homelessness problem.
    4. The 91st-95th percentile has been a very slight winner and the 96th-99th has been a much more significant winner.
    5. The  top 1% (and, especially, the top 0.1% and 0.01%) has been the big winner, although they lost some ground since 2007.
    6. Other charts in the article suggest things didn’t change much from 2016 to 2018, although Trump’s tax and transfer payment changes may have hit those at the bottom and pushed more money to the top, and perhaps the improvement in working conditions has improved things a smidge for the middle since 2018.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 5:42am

    Reply to #6
    macro2682

    macro2682

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Sep 03 2009

    Posts: 344

    1+

    Vlierheimer

    Is it a for profit business, or NFP org?  If it’s the former, how can I invest?  If it’s the latter, how can I help?

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 5:50am

    Reply to #4

    Quercus bicolor

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 318

    2+

    Wells Fargo Ownership

    The list of Wells Fargo ownership looks like a cross section of those who have seen increased income in the past 40 years (see chart in my previous post).  Hedge Funds, other investment firms and big banks represent the top 1% or maybe 0.1%.  Mutual fund companies including one with a mutual ownership structure (owned by it’s fund investors) represent the those in the next 4-9%.  There is one insurance company that has a mutual ownership policy (State Farm – theoretically owned by it’s policy holders).  But who knows how much the top executives of even those mutually owned companies skim off as salaries and bonuses (Vanguard at least has by far the lowest expense ratios in the business for their funds).

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 6:14am

    #9

    Afridev

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Oct 11 2013

    Posts: 150

    6+

    Some background

    From The Saker:

    Capitalism in America: How a Dismal Decimal is Robbing Americans Blind

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 6:17am

    Reply to #4
    macro2682

    macro2682

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Sep 03 2009

    Posts: 344

    5+

    Institutional

    The Wells Fargo owners list you shared are just investment firms.  The pooled assets they represent, which collectively own Wells Fargo, are institutional (public and corporate) pensions, endowments, foundations, ultra high net worth individuals, and middle class 401K assets.

    These owners are not inherently bad people/actors.  It’s the frameworks and incentives in our country that are misaligned.

    America measures success by the health of those living the dream.  These are the people we all watch on TV and pretend to be on Instagram.  Instead of idolizing and aspiring to be THESE people (who are often miserable themselves), we need to somehow adjust the metrics and incentives we care about in order to get us excited and aspirational about the guy with the Mohawk who’s building houses for the homeless.

    It’s individualism vs collectivism   It’s what Sebastian talks about in Tribe.

    How do we inspire people to want to be like mohawk-guy?  We need The socially connected reward system we evolved to desire.

     

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 8:01am

    Reply to #4
    Edwardelinski

    Edwardelinski

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Dec 23 2012

    Posts: 338

    4+

    Wells Fargo Fake Account Scandal

    American Banker reporting High-Level Wells executives are under criminal investigation and may be indicted as soon as this month.The probe could yield the most high profile criminal charges since the financial crisis.Dragging them out in cuffs would be a nice touch….

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 8:55am

    #10
    Kman

    Kman

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Jan 19 2009

    Posts: 43

    3+

    Joe Rodota Trail

    I have watched the Joe Rodota trail transition over the years from the nice bike path that bicyclists and families used to enjoy.  Its now a sprawling homeless camp that entails great risk to ones personal safety to transit.  Think also of all the residents that live in the homes behind this area- it has become a nightmare.  The County appears to be getting ready to clear it out (again), so will see how that works.   However this is not simply a income disparity issue.  If you are able and willing- there is no shortage of work in Sonoma County.  I think this very well done video speaks to the larger issue(s): https://komonews.com/news/local/komo-news-special-seattle-is-dying

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 9:05am

    Reply to #9

    Adam Taggart

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2953

    7+

    The Dismal Decimal

    Thanks for that Saker link, Afridev.

    Here’s one slide from it showing how the top 0.1% are pulling way ahead of everyone, even the remaining 0.9% of the top 1%:

    I like how the Saker refers to the 0.1% as the “Dismal Decimal”, the tiny elite hoovering up all the world’s wealth.

    Like all social shifts, change is going to require a shift in perception. Right now, society is remaining tolerant of the billionaire class — wrapped in the mantle of ‘proof of the the American Dream’ and the fruits of the benefits of capitalism. In many ways we still venerate and celebrate their wealth.

    The change we need won’t happen until we admit the system has metastasized into a cancer very different from what we pretend it to be.

    We don’t have capitalism where the plucky and hardworking can succeed on a level playing field. We have ‘crony capitalism’ where the rich and powerful control the rulemakers, enforcers, and profit & information flows to slant the playing field increasingly to their advantage — squeezing out competition.

    It’s deeply unfair. And when left unchecked as it is now, it ends with Plutarch’s prophecy of the desperate masses rising in revolt against the master class. Nobody benefits by going down that road.

    What’s the solution? I don’t have all the answers, but stopping the current subsidization of the rich by ending central banking’s intervention in the economy and financial markets is a good place to start.

    The central banks (many of which, like the US Federal Reserve, are owned by private banks) are picking winners and losers.

    They are rewarding those who own financial assets (predominately the already rich), providing dirt cheap credit to corporations fueling stock buybacks and investment in automation (further driving up the price of said financial assets), enabling otherwise failed businesses to persist as zombie companies, and bailing out these players when the music stops.

    On the other side of the ledger, savers have been destroyed. The $trillions in new thin-air money have driven the cost of living so high that household and capital formation is now out of reach for an increasing majority of society. Millions of jobs are being lost for good to globalization, robotics and AI. Little of the growing debt pile and deficit spending is being invested back in improving our infrastructure, education or health care systems. And yet, when the music stops, it’s the bottom 99% that gets stuck with the bill via layoffs, higher fees and higher taxes. No bailouts for Joe Sixpack.

    I’m NOT a fan of wealth redistribution as a general policy. I believe competition and the incentive structure offered by true capitalism, tempered with enough limits to protect the “commons”, is probably the best system we yet know of.

    But when the game becomes as rigged and the wealth as concentrated as its becoming now, it will be corrected. Either by policy or by pitchfork.

    And both paths start with a change in sentiment towards those holding all the cards.

    The Dismal Decimal should start being very worried.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 10:40am

    #11
    Hugh Acland

    Hugh Acland

    Status: Member

    Joined: Oct 07 2008

    Posts: 5

    1+

    Who cares?!

    I’m a bond trader at JP Morgan and I’ve never known it so good! The Fed buys everything I tell them at prices I demand. My bonus this quarter is going to be MASSIVE!

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 11:22am

    #12
    RocketDoc

    RocketDoc

    Status: Member

    Joined: Aug 28 2013

    Posts: 25

    2+

    Greed and Resentment

    I bought a pitchfork.  I’m not into guns.  I’m going to put it on my front porch as a symbol of the Jeffersonian yeoman farmer ideal.  I am trying to think of someone I could use it on locally but I am in the top 10% and might experience a little blow-back if push came to shove.  I am greedy for new experiences and am resentful that I have no one to vote for.  Overall I have no complaints except that I am old.  My last demonstration was Mayday against the Vietnam War when we turned trash cans into the street to block the Pentagon workers from getting to work.  I would counsel the politically interested to go to a City Council meeting and lobby for no new “growth”.  Tell all the people.  They will ignore you but that is the first step….

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 11:32am

    Reply to #4

    Matt Holbert

    Status: Member

    Joined: Oct 03 2008

    Posts: 93

    1+

    State Farm

    As a 40-year loyal customer of State Farm, I would like see a distribution of some of that $2.78 Billion. I would not invest it in Wells Fargo…

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 11:52am

    Reply to #9
    VTGothic

    VTGothic

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jan 05 2020

    Posts: 59

    6+

    Won't Touch the 0.01%

    I largely agree with your views in this comment, Adam.
    But, of course, when the pitchforks do come out – or, should it come first to a collapse of the bubble – the plutocrats in the Dismal Decimal will not be on the pointy end of the revolt – or the bust. They will remain behind the curtain, largely unknown to the masses and certainly insulated by layers of security, legal teams, bought politicians, loyal public safety officers, military troops, corporate screens, and remote addresses across the globe. It will be those whose bodies and jobs make up the screen that hides and protects them who will take the beating. It’s what they’re paid for, and the deeper into the screen they’re located, the better they’re paid to hold the line and deflect and blunt the hoi polloi’s anger.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 12:00pm

    #13
    skipr

    skipr

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Jan 09 2016

    Posts: 161

    5+

    trailer parks

    A while back there was an interesting tidbit in the Max Keiser show.  He described how Wall Street is about to sink their fangs into trailer parks since the growing homeless population will make it the next profit center if they can muster enough money to live there.  I guess they have sucked as much of the blood out of the student loans and have to find something new to keep increasing “growth”

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 12:08pm

    Reply to #4
    VTGothic

    VTGothic

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jan 05 2020

    Posts: 59

    3+

    Spending the "owners" money

    Back during my brief life as a State Farm agency owner, I tell you we really lived it up at our various regional meetings. Strictly 5-star – on your dime. Having been a State Farm customer for over 2 decades before becoming an agency principal it really bothered me how the company spent money that, really, doesn’t belong to the corporation. Like you now, I then thought we should be returning it to our members in the forms of annual profit sharing and/or reduced rates.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 2:07pm

    Reply to #9

    Quercus bicolor

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 318

    4+

    Really horrid, Adam.  And it gets worse as you narrow it further.  My chart in comment # 8  shows that the top .01% (about the top 12500 households in the U.S. or the top 40 or so households among the million people living nearest you) fared even better.  I wonder if there’s data on the top .001% (1250 households), top .0001% (125 households) or .00001% (12 households).

    Imagine a series of billboards.  The first shows a simple chart showing how income inequality is growing (something you can digest in 3 seconds).  The second has that image of the plutarch quote you ended with:

    And maybe a third with an image of a crowd with pitchforks and a quote “Let’s fix this before …”

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 5:50pm

    #14

    sand_puppy

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 2143

    4+

    Stage is being set to vilify pitch-forkers in Richmond Virginia on Monday

    This evenings TV news and print news are setting the stage.  A gun rights rally in Richmond Virginia is scheduled for January 20, MLK day.  Who are the players?

    A reasonable and moderate toned governor is trying to preserve peace and advance the ideals of civilization and tolerance by banning firearms in the state.

    Governor Northam has banned firearms in the park near the capitol building on Jan 20 to thwart the “armed militias” that are expected to gather for the demonstration.

    Nazis and white supremacists oppose him and seek to advance their goals of bigotry and starting a race war under the clever rubric of “gun rights.”  The FBI has moved pro actively to arrest 3 white supremacists in advance of the rally.  This white supremacist group goes by the name “the base,” which is the english translation of al Qaada,  clearly a terrorist group.  It doesn’t say so explicitly, but it implies that the rally will be full of Nazis and white supremacists, just like what happened in Charlottesville last year.  And nobody wants that!

    The stage is set.  The forces of civilization, peace and reason are aligned against bigots, racists and domestic terrorists who clearly cannot be trusted to own guns.  My God.  We must protect our children and defend civilization itself.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 16, 2020 - 8:28pm

    #15
    Time2help

    Time2help

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: Jun 08 2011

    Posts: 2329

    2+

    Stage is definitely (a) set

    Agitprop anyone?

    Inquiring minds want to know if Gov. Northam isn’t pushing all of this as payback for favorable media treatment he received last year during his “blackface/KKK” debacle.

    Gov. Ralph Northam admits he was in 1984 yearbook photo showing figures in blackface, KKK hood (Washington Post)

    And how much has Bloomberg and company contributed to his next reelection campaign (or possibly a Congressional run)?

    Bloomberg Anti-Gun Group Pumps $2.5M into Virginia Election (Guns.com)

    As far as bigotry goes…

    Same shit, different day. Great distraction though. Epstein seems to have really rattled a few cages.

    In the interim more made for TV drama coming right up. For those who still waste time with CNN and Faux News…don’t forget to keep an eye out for Harrison Hanks.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 4:09am

    Reply to #14
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 932

    9+

    Boots on the ground

    A group of families from our community will be attending the MLK, and lobby day festivities at theRichmond VA. state capital. Wishes for our safety and effectiveness are appreciated.

     

    robie,husband,father,farmer,optometrist

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 7:17am

    #16

    thc0655

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: Apr 27 2010

    Posts: 1806

    5+

    Best wishes Robie

    I hope you aren’t caught in any traps that have been laid or any false flags.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 7:20am

    #17
    Lions

    Lions

    Status: Member

    Joined: May 19 2018

    Posts: 28

    5+

    comment on poverty in America

    This is definitely a sad State of Affairs. When I lived in Northern California I knew many affluent people. All of them would have made sympathy noises for these individuals if they had seen this video, however, I can honestly say I don’t know anyone who would have helped these people. Most of them would not even give a dime to their own families. We are doing to other people exactly what the government, the fed, and the elites are doing to us. The United States is a social toilet of inequity. It would better to be impoverished in many Central and South American countries then it would be in the United States. At least in Costa Rica you could live off of the fruit trees and be surrounded by Beauty. Living the standard middle class life is a bit of a slow suicide anyway. These people have lives that have no meaning at all.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 7:22am

    #18

    sand_puppy

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 2143

    6+

    Call for extra emergency medicine personnel in Richmond this weekend

    My email this morning includes a special request from the director of the Henrico Doctors Hospital Emergency Departments and Trauma Services in Richmond to have emergency and surgery department docs and nurses on call for potential “mass casualty event” in Richmond over the weekend.  Trauma care equipment is stocked to a high level.

    It includes the governors “declaration of emergency” for the state for the 3 days weekend.  Again, I am struck by the way the issue is being framed.  There does not seem to include any acknowledgment of the role the governments proposed legislation is playing in precipitating this crisis and bringing it to Virginia.  Attention and blame is entirely on the “militias” and those dedicated to “hate.”

    The governor’s declaration is here.

    The Commonwealth of Virginia is a welcoming state. Virginians understand that diversity of opinion keeps our democracy strong. The more voices involved in our political dialogue, the stronger we are.  Civil discourse, even and especially, amongst those who disagree, is critical to our democracy’s evolution and success.  When the civility of that political discourse breaks down, the Commonwealth suffers. Three years ago, Virginia and the nation, watched horrified as civil protest was marred by violence and hate. The events that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia demonstrated what can happen when peaceful demonstrations are hijacked by those who come into the Commonwealth and do not value the importance of peaceful assembly. We lost three Virginians. We must take all precautions to prevent that from ever happening again.

    Credible intelligence gathered by Virginia’s law enforcement agencies indicates that tens of thousands of advocates plan to converge on Capitol Square for events culminating on January 20, 2020. Available information suggests that a substantial number of these demonstrators are expected to come from outside the Commonwealth, may be armed, and have as their purpose not peaceful assembly but violence, rioting, and insurrection.

    All firearms and weapons by protestors are banned for the weekend.  “Other weapons” banned include padding, sticks, torches, poles, bats, shields, helmets, caustic substances (i.e., pepper spray), hazardous materials, scissors, razor blades, needles, toy guns, toy weapons, fireworks, glass bottles, laser pointers, aerosol containers, baseballs, softballs, UAVs/Drones.

    Except riot police to be armed and armored by all of the above.   How many high power sniper rifles with scopes will be trained on the crowds?)

    The governor has built for himself a shit-storm.

    If I were going, I would work out a fall-back rally point for my party, carry photocopies of id but not the originals, carry water bottles and food.  I would also quickly move away from unruly sorts holding Nazi flags, as stuff is likely to happen there.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 8:52am

    #19
    davefairtex

    davefairtex

    Status: Member

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 1901

    5+

    division

    China couldn’t ask for a better plan to divide and weaken the US than this.  I wouldn’t be shocked to find CCP money behind this particular effort.

    What is Governor Blackface thinking here?  Who is pulling his strings?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 5:28pm

    Reply to #9
    Angela Johnson

    Angela Johnson

    Status: Member

    Joined: Dec 17 2016

    Posts: 3

    3+

    Nationalize the banks

    banking should be a public utility, a wholly owned department of the government.  If the people are to pay for the actions of the banks, and guarantee the debt based monetary system, then it should be owned by the people.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2020 - 5:34pm

    #20
    Angela Johnson

    Angela Johnson

    Status: Member

    Joined: Dec 17 2016

    Posts: 3

    7+

    the middle class

    I have read many articles, like Shadow Stats, on the perversion of the measurements used to describe our economy.  But there is one I have not seen, and would like an answer to, or to be pointed to where I could figure it out myself.  I think the middle class has not merely shrunk, not merely decimated, but is magnitudes fewer in number than we are led to believe.  If one corrected all the mutated metrics used to measure a middle class lifestyle, and started comparing apples to apples, how much has it fallen in the 40 years since Ronald Reagan began the assault in favor of the rich?  If it has not fallen as much as I fear, how many more working hours are required to maintain it now?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 7:17am

    #21
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 932

    5+

    will try to post

    observations and video, if interesting, after the Richmond, VA rally. We have no TV so you folk are a big part of our news. Thank you.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 9:35am

    #22
    Tude

    Tude

    Status: Member

    Joined: Apr 01 2017

    Posts: 10

    1+

    Prop 13 and foriegn

    Talking about the housing issues in California without talking about prop 13 and the thousands of empty properties owned by foriegn “investors” is pointless. But those are the unmentionable issues that seem to be a third rail.

     

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 12:37pm

      Reply to #14
      rhammond1956

      rhammond1956

      Status: Member

      Joined: Sep 05 2014

      Posts: 2

      3+

      What?

      99% of normal people in VA are not crazed white supremacist just folks that refuse to give up their right to the 2nd amendment.  Northam is not reasonable nor is your new state legislator group doing something noble for safety reasons.  Criminals and mass murderers will not care about your gun grabbing laws.  [Moderator: ad hominem remark removed]

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 4:35pm

      Reply to #10
      agitating prop

      agitating prop

      Status: Silver Member

      Joined: May 28 2009

      Posts: 340

      2+

      If you are able and willing- there is no shortage of work in Sonoma County.  I think this very well done video speaks to the larger issue(s): https://komonews.com/news/local/komo-news-special-seattle-is-dying

      One thing that everybody misses is the contribution crystal meth made to creating legions of mentally ill individuals. Meth often causes long term psychosis, even after the addict quits.  Oxy doesn’t And the even larger issue here is why there are so many meth addicts to begin with.

      People who worked 2 or 3 jobs to get by,  turned to meth so they could work longer hours, according to the author, below. I use the past tense as I don’t know if meth is currently being consumed in as large a quantity as it was a few years ago. But…nevertheless, the long term consequences are grim.

      “You don’t have to eat, sleep or drink water, so if you’re somebody who works on a manufacturing line or does farm work or meatpacking work, for instance, it’s a drug that can come in handy, in terms of helping you to work harder,” Reding says.

      Reding says that the agricultural industry has consolidated over time, and the working class has had to work harder for less — which has made meth more attractive. As an example, he cites a meatpacking plant that was bought in 1987; the new company cut wages from $18 an hour to $6.20.

      “If you’re a guy like Roland Jarvis … you’ve got to work extra hard to make less than you were yesterday,” Reding says. “Meth is often seen as a helpful drug in that instance because you don’t have to sleep. You don’t even have to go to bed before working your next shift.”

      https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=106388550

      So KMan, if you think that all of the jobs out there will solve the problem –if people just get it together and apply, you are so off the mark, it beggars belief. I don’t mean to offend. Sorry–but I feel very passionate about this issue.

       

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 5:07pm

      #23

      Adam Taggart

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: May 25 2009

      Posts: 2953

      4+

      Coverage by CNN

      Wow – our little corner of northern California is catching the nation’s attention.

      Just hours ago, CNN issued a video segment reporting on the Joe Rodota Trail homeless encampment. It does a good job raising the complex challenges involved:

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 5:48pm

      #24
      NickAdams10

      NickAdams10

      Status: Member

      Joined: Feb 05 2015

      Posts: 50

      2+

      @Adam_Taggart

      Americans have always, at least in my life time, blamed the people who live in camps like these for their own fates due to flaws in their character. After all, the “reasoning” goes, if they simply worked hard enough and made better choices, they could afford better housing.

      I’ve heard that attitude expressed hundreds of times, and I really doubt that it is going to change. You can talk all you want with these people about housing costs outstripping wage growth and about “insurance” plans with $9000 deductibles, but the people who hold the they-deserve-it mindset aren’t going to change their minds.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 6:43pm

      #25

      sand_puppy

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 13 2011

      Posts: 2143

      2+

      VA senator on Jan 20 Rally: "We are being set up"

      Abbreviated from a  post here that seemed too hyperbolic and rambling:

      VA State Senator 72 Hours Before Rally: ‘We Are Being Set Up’

      Conservative Sen. Amanda Chase of District 11 took to Facebook on Friday with a warning for every patriot who plans to attend the pro-Second Amendment rally Monday in Richmond.   “Sadly, I am posting this, knowing that the Governor of Virginia has declared a State of Emergency in our state,” Chase wrote. “I want you to be aware of how we are being set up.”

      “Does the Patriot Act ring a bell? Does the National Defense Authorization Act ring a bell?”  Chase argued that these laws could be used to paint pro-Second Amendment  activists as “domestic terrorist[s].  The Governor, using the media has already set the stage for this to happen,” Chase wrote. “He has already laid the groundwork to make the entire movement look like insurrection.”

      It’s not just militia members and those wearing camouflage who have reason to worry, even military veterans have been flagged as potential threats.   “Military veterans were/are even listed as potential domestic terrorist.”

      Northam indeed claims to have intelligence that some of the groups attending the Monday rally will be intent on insurrection.

      Despite Northam’s emergency gun ban at the rally, it’s unclear how many of the tens of thousands of expected rally attendees will obey his decree.  [How many will be carrying guns?]

      The Virginia Citizens Defense League and Gun Owners of America, two groups behind the massive rally, attempted to battle Northam’s order in court.   They appealed all the way to the Virginia Supreme Court, where Northam’s gun ban was upheld on Friday.

      Hopefully, violence can be avoided. But with many rally goers almost certainly unwilling to bend on their right to bear arms and Northam seemingly intent on enforcing his order with state and local police, we can only wait and see — and pray.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 7:03pm

      Reply to #24
      agitating prop

      agitating prop

      Status: Silver Member

      Joined: May 28 2009

      Posts: 340

      2+

      Also, Nick

      You also get the tired, “it’s a mental health issue,” as if poor mental health either occurs in a vacuum or is a choice.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 7:20pm

      #26

      sand_puppy

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 13 2011

      Posts: 2143

      5+

      "Tragic sacrifices" to mold public policy

      Remember the 3,000 killed as the twin towers “collapsed.”  Or the 2,403 killed at Pearl Harbor during the “surprise attack.”

      3,000 dead seems to be just the right amount of psychic trauma to a nation that major policy can be shifted.

      I am very worried that my Virginia friends who support civilian gun ownership and who will attend the rally in Richmond will find themselves in the middle of an orchestrated mass trauma event.   From agents provocateur to Maiden Protest Snipers to citizens boiling in rage and fear, to simple stampedes.  We have a very diverse group of people who have been brought together over a common concern:  civilian gun ownership.

      Antifa, conservatives, soldiers, national guard, off duty LEO, Nazi’s, those who just don’t trust the government, those driven into severe poverty, Jeffersonian patriots, and a few who want a race war.  They are all mixed in together.

      Some are really really pissed.  A few might be ready to start the civil war NOW.

      I am worried that friends, who are not ready to shoot or be shot (yet) for the cause, will be standing in the killing fields as those who are ready to shoot, do so.  And that it has all been designed to blow-up, giving the country the 3,000-dead-level-of-trauma needed to sweep through the new legislation.

      I sure hope that I am wrong.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 9:10pm

      Reply to #10
      davefairtex

      davefairtex

      Status: Member

      Joined: Sep 03 2008

      Posts: 1901

      5+

      working harder for less

      agitating prop-

      I’ve seen meth kill people too.  It grabs people and it just doesn’t let go.  I didn’t connect it to work, but that does make sense.

      I believe a critical contributing factor to falling wages in the industry is the wave of (20 million?) illegals who think $7/hour is just a fantastic wage.  (Any idea how much an RN makes working Emergency in a southeast asia hospital?  That would be $4.57/hour.)

      You can bet the donor class of all Republicans (and now, most Democrats) support further waves of enthusiastic illegals to keep those corporate profits high, and the wages low, by increasing the supply of labor that is excited to work for $7/hour.

      This deliberate act of policy drops working-class American salaries down to the levels of the third world.

      “Border crossing no longer illegal!  Sanctuary Cities!  Lower wages for all working class Americans!  Cheaper nannies and gardeners!”  If you don’t like this policy, you’re just a racist.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 9:41pm

      Reply to #23
      ao

      ao

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Feb 04 2009

      Posts: 1223

      4+

      other "campers" on the Rodota trail

      Adam,

      Looks like there are other “campers” there.  Yikes!  Makes you wonder about the possibilities of plague.

      BTW, the resolution on the sheriff helicopter’s IR was impressive.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 11:23pm

      Reply to #24
      mntnhousepermi

      mntnhousepermi

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Feb 19 2016

      Posts: 252

      2+

      but for many it is

      First, did you listen to the 2 people the CNN video focused on ?  They are there by choice, it is an easy life for them.  This is also the case for the camps we have had in my area of CA.  Because of teh court case mentioned, what our area did was make shelter space available, which 90% of the camp residents did not want nor take, so then it was legal to tear down the tent camp.  The tent camps have a mix of people, some of which we should be taking care of, like mentally ill or veterans and other there by choice for a drug/bike theft life style.

      Now, the car campers are a different set, some of them are overlaps with the tent encampments but many of them are working and do it as housing is unavailable.  And, I also wonder, as a different poster mentioned,  how much is due to property speculation, bought up and left empty by foreign investers, and also other properties converted into vacation rentals so also off the market for local working people to rent or buy.

      But, I also know that top down state mandates on forced dense housing builds are ruining many areas and making them unliveable.  I wonder why we are not allowed to say, for some landlocked, fully built up cities like the ones by me, this city is full, is it realy desireable to make small cities have high rise housing ?

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sat, Jan 18, 2020 - 11:55pm

      #27
      mntnhousepermi

      mntnhousepermi

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Feb 19 2016

      Posts: 252

      3+

      Some things we could do

      For people who want it, in this county, we make simple, inexpensive living illegal.  My guess is because the county wants the tax money.

      Examples:  It is illegal to build a small house to live in, there are minimum size requirements.  It is illegal to live in a yurt or trailer on your own property.  So, it is illegal for a person of modest means to provide for themselves in a simple, affordable manner, even if they have managed to scrape up the money to buy the acre of land out of town.

      There is a young couple around the corner from me who are visible from the road, and realy flaunting it. Cross your fingers that they dont get called in.  But, they bought the land, not a very desirable parcel which is why the only housing site is so close to the road.  They put up a yurt on a wooden platform that they built.  A well with a solar pump and very small raised tank.  They are right by a stream and I do wish we could ensure that waste is taken care of, but…. we are not sensible enough to only require and inspect for the only 3 that we should care about for community safety (1) clean drinking water (2) waste water/toileting dealt with appropriately ( like a septic system.  They do not have this, I know)(3) safely connected and wired electric power, even if off grid because of fire danger

      We also either made illegal or zoning coded out the kind of junky private camp grounds that used to serve some itenerant and lower income people.  The one I am remembering that was in the county had bathrooms, clean tap water, safe electric hookups and trash service, and was not very much money each night, and less by the month.  Seems to me that we dont need to reinstate this with government ownership, we realy just need to get out of the way to let the need get met.  Obviously, we DO need long term mental health beds, drug rehab for those willing, etc…. But, we could let some enterprising person run a cheap campground again, we just need to designate an area that could be used ! Obviously, many in the current tent encampments who are lifestyle residents, would not go there either, not to mention that there would be rules.  But it would serve many who are the falling thru the cracks working and/or disabled that cannot afford other options and should be allowed to chose a place that has some ammenities rather than on the street or bike trail.

      Once you start to peel off those we can help, and who will accept the help, in what ever ways we do it, we will still be left with some people, and in this county, at this point, this last group is now the majority of the tent encampment people.  So you can house many, you can make shelters too, but there is this core group that is in it for the lifestyle.  We have an awful lot of bike theft and bike chop shops, house break ins, etc… for the drugs they buy. ( Real cute that CNN labeled the bike guy as some kind of recycler !! ) At that point, we should be allowed, as a community, to say they have to leave town, not camp on the sidewalk, not shoot up in the bathroom by the kids playground at the park !  I guess we need to appeal to the supreme court the 9th circuit ruling ?  Just hope this madness of that ruling doesnt come to your state !

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 3:34am

      #28
      rhammond1956

      rhammond1956

      Status: Member

      Joined: Sep 05 2014

      Posts: 2

      2+

      What?

      Apologies for the previous reply (ad hominen remark removed) as I digressed into 2nd amendment subject.  On the homeless “crisis” I strongly believe this is truly misleading as it really is more of a drug crisis.  Being mentally ill and homeless are symptoms of drug and alcohol abuse.  Call it what it is and it may stand a chance for change.  Like this, it will continue to be incorrectly addressed.  If you focus on shelter, the real issues go begging … literally.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 5:17am

      Reply to #26

      Rector

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Feb 07 2010

      Posts: 353

      2+

      Lots of chatter - mostly hype

      Although it is a worrying stew – I think this gathering is just too obvious for the usual false flag.  It seems “surprise” is part of the psychic trauma – and this looks like a bad riot with intermittent shootings in the worst case.  Our blood soaked population needs something far worse if they want a knee-jerk, social changing event.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 8:04am

      Reply to #6
      vlierheimer

      vlierheimer

      Status: Member

      Joined: Feb 22 2019

      Posts: 10

      3+

      Hi macro2682, good to see you.

      It’s a for profit LLC. I believe this is possible to create win-win situations with pure, (not crony or vulture) capitalism.In a nutshell, I go around the Southern Colorado area looking for bank-owned properties to rehab. (Been rehabbing properties for 20 years)

      I partner with local food banks and homeless service agencies, as well as addiction rehab programs that actually work (Oxford House is the best) to handpick clients who show determination and promise in their desire for recovery and to be housed.

      I cap my profits in this part of my portfolio at 5 percent. Clients pay a sliver under competitive rent ( no more than ten percent less) and usually first month’s rent and deposit is covered by local food bank or other homeless assistance programs, both public and private.

      Six properties so far, and some very, very heartwarming success stories. Clients have a ‘runway’ to get up to speed, and are shortly paying near-normal rates. My small cadre of investors and I get our five percent, and the community gets productive members of society instead of desperate folks on the streets.

      Let me know here if you want to pursue this. Anyone else is welcome to as well. 🙂

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 8:16am

      Reply to #10
      Kman

      Kman

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Jan 19 2009

      Posts: 43

      Missed the point

      agitating prop,  I am guessing you made your comments without watching the video I linked.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 8:22am

      Reply to #24
      Tude

      Tude

      Status: Member

      Joined: Apr 01 2017

      Posts: 10

      2+

      High Density Housing

      Obviously more high density housing is the answer..

      Nearly 250,000 NYC rental apartments sit vacant

       

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 10:18am

      Reply to #6
      bhami

      bhami

      Status: Member

      Joined: Jan 19 2009

      Posts: 4

      Please define “business”, “swing”, and “thriving”.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 2:45pm

      #29
      Robert Blum

      Robert Blum

      Status: Member

      Joined: Nov 12 2010

      Posts: 5

      1+

      Perhaps, politicians, bureaucratic agencies and the uneducated should not corrupt and pervert the natural laws of economics and the basic concept of sound money.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 6:42pm

      Reply to #27
      PaulaCraig

      PaulaCraig

      Status: Member

      Joined: Sep 23 2019

      Posts: 2

      1+

      Out-of-control building codes, zoning regulations, and parking requirements

      American cities are set up to provide housing to the well-off. Poor people are systematically excluded by law in most places. These laws include building codes (which typically require several hundred square feet person). Zoning regulations usually require that only certain types of housing be built, such as single family housing, and block the ability of people to split housing costs by moving in together. Simple things such as building a separate apartment in the basement of a house are usually illegal. Even in homes with a huge back yard, it’s usually illegal to put a tiny house back there. Parking requirements set aside huge amounts of land for parking that could be used for housing, thus pushing up housing prices.

      Part of the reason for all this relates to inequality. Pretty much nobody wants to live near poor people. Developers usually prefer building a million-dollar house instead of building 50 houses for $20,000 each. It’s easier and cheaper for them to sell a big house to one family instead of small, cheap homes to 50 families. In my neighborhood things have gotten so bad that the local hospital is trying to build apartment buildings on its land, so that its lower-level employees can have some hope of finding a place to live.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 7:35pm

      Reply to #24
      Edwardelinski

      Edwardelinski

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Dec 23 2012

      Posts: 338

      2+

      Nick

      If you have time,pick up a copy of Dignity by Chris Arnade.He spent 20 years trading bonds for Citibank.A few years after the financial crisis he walked away and began his journey  trying to understand poverty in America.He lived in his car for years travelling the country.He does an excellent job explaining the back row to the front row.One of his more profound takeaways is even amid pain and poverty community can thrive…

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 8:05pm

      Reply to #27
      vlierheimer

      vlierheimer

      Status: Member

      Joined: Feb 22 2019

      Posts: 10

      Response to Paula Craig

      Eh, not everywhere. I’m a developer in southern Colorado, and workforce housing is exactly what we’re doing. The town is very open to it, in fact they are rushing to accommodate what we are trying to do. Unfettered capitalism really does work, it’s all about the win/win.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Sun, Jan 19, 2020 - 8:34pm

      Reply to #27
      mntnhousepermi

      mntnhousepermi

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Feb 19 2016

      Posts: 252

      I find the opposite in the town near here, due to pressure from the state, and developers ! The developers love being able to build denser housing, and use every square foot of the lots and skimp on parking !  More profits to townhouses, 5 or 6 townhouses vs one single family home.  Never enough parking provided.

      Also, it is quite legal to put in backyard buildings, they call them ADU Accessory Dwelling Units.  ANd why not ? More fees to the county ! We have insane permit fees.  Many programs are funded by the fees.  Out of town, people are now building the second units without permits, there are many right in the few blocks around me.  Why do it illegal when they are not just allowed but wanted ?  Well, it costs as much or more for the permit fees than the unit itself ! I think around $20-25k for a simple studio second unit, for the permit fees.

      Parking.  Well, you can imagine the congestion in town that is resulting from all of this.  Townhouses and apartments instead of single family homes.  Single family homes changed or added to 2 or 3 units, legally or illegally.  The curb side parking and the size of the roads hasnt changed at all.  More people for the same area with no change in infrastructure has resulted in congested roads and not enough parking.  So, maybe New York city doesnt need parking, or San Francisco, you dont need a car there.  But, most existing cities and town of 50,000 with people who commute to other areas, yes they all have cars and pretending that they will all just go car free to put in another townhouse instead of enough parking doesnt change it.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 7:06am

      #30

      sand_puppy

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 13 2011

      Posts: 2143

      8+

      Thomas Jefferson on "Natural Manure"

      Jefferson was quite the rebel spirit.  Intensely averse to being dominated by authorities, he advocated for a number or remarkable ideals and an essential tool affecting the balance of power between the people and the government.  The firearm.

      1. That all human beings were created equal and endowed by their creator basic rights.
      2. That a government’s power would always reside in the hands of the governed.
      3. And that power would gathered into the hands of tyrants, and need to be pried free by force.

      Jefferson did NOT advocate for a peaceful law-and-order situation nor a protective “nanny state.”   He wanted the people always vigilant for tyranny, and bold enough and assertive enough to prevent the consolidation of power.

      Firearms played an essential role in his own personal psychology and his vision of the society he wished to create.

      A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind…..  Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks.

      I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery.

      –“Paine and Jefferson on Liberty”, (1988) p.89,

      The clash of citizens and tyrannical government was seen as inevitable.

      The course of history shows that as a government grows, liberty decreases.

      The constitutions of most of our States assert that all power is inherent in the people; that… it is their right and duty to be at all times armed.

      For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well-organized and armed militia is their best security.

      What country before ever existed a century and a half without a rebellion? And what country can preserve its liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.

      At this point in history, we find ourselves in the end stages of the consolidation of power.  The power is not just held by force, by by the skillful application of the technology of propaganda that exploits the vulnerabilities of the human psyche.  Citizens no longer can know whether a building collapsed or was blown up, whether a president is or is not a puppet of a foreign power, whether a vote count is accurate, nor whether a war to eliminate WMDs is legitimate.

      The public/private oligarchy kills with impunity, lies casually to its people and harvests the labor and wealth of the common person for their own benefit.  We have a relationship more like the farmer-to-his-flock.

      We are deep into tyranny.

      This is exactly what Jefferson was talking about.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 9:08am

      #31

      sand_puppy

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 13 2011

      Posts: 2143

      5+

      Personal Report from Lobby Day in Richmond

      A close friend, age 77, and shooting buddy from Charlottesville reports from the bus en route to Richmond, and then from the gun rally.

      6:00 am

      On the bus to Richmond. It’s full.

      More women than I expected. No one seems nervous. If they are they’re not showing it. Party atmosphere like we’re going to a ball game.

      A police escort boarded the bus. Riding on in with us. Couple of friendly guys.

      11:20 am

      Huge crowds. I only saw 3 young college kids with camo and face paint carrying ar15s. They looked scared and stuck close together.  Unintentionally surrounded by a huge crowd, as was I.  Between the huge crowd s and massive police presence, I don’t think Antifa can cause much damage. A bystander commented that if they shoot a reporter or two it would look bad for us. But I don’t think 3 white middle class college kids will risk being tried for murder.  Let’s hope not.

      I feel safe and so glad I am here for this historic event. Will send pics later.

      11:30

      Police very friendly to us.

      Nice work police officers!!  A friendly police attitude may be the secret magic that keeps this event from going oppositional.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 9:56am

      #32

      thc0655

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 27 2010

      Posts: 1806

      RICHMOND update: white supremacists everywhere

      https://www.citizenfreepress.com/breaking/proud-black-gun-owner-drops-truth-bomb-on-lying-msm/

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 10:56am

      #33
      Chris Martenson

      Chris Martenson

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Jun 07 2007

      Posts: 5025

      1+

      Police In VA ...

      …aren’t going to be the problem if this one is any indication:

      https://twitter.com/MichaelCoudrey/status/1219283286888837120

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 11:19am

      #34

      AKGrannyWGrit

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Feb 06 2011

      Posts: 814

      2+

      Peak Prosperity for 3 people

       

      Per the University of Massachusetts – 50% of seniors living alone are financially insecure!

      Peak Prosperity -oh ah for who –  3 individuals in the US own as much as the entire bottom half.

       

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 11:40am

      #35
      Time2help

      Time2help

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Jun 08 2011

      Posts: 2329

      2+

      Re: White Supremacists

      Meanwhile…spotted earlier this morning in downtown Richmond, VA.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 11:54am

      #36

      sand_puppy

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 13 2011

      Posts: 2143

      3+

      Friend is on bus on way home from Richmond

      Very happy to have my friend on the bus and on his way home to Charlottesville.  He reports:

      2:06 PM

      Bus is rolling home. Great experience! Pics later.

      Police were very friendly. Some were wearing the orange “Guns save lives” stickers from RRPC [Rivanna Rifle and Pistol Club–the local shooting range in Charlottesville].

      Surprised to see so many rifles including AR types.  One guy had an M1 Garand 308 like I was issued during Vietnam with bayonet attached, very imposing!

      Best info I have so far is:  No shots fired,  no fights,  no reports of arrests.

      Better than your usual county fair.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 12:27pm

      #37
      ezlxq1949

      ezlxq1949

      Status: Bronze Member

      Joined: Apr 29 2009

      Posts: 331

      2+

      Richmond was a success?

      This event has had almost no media coverage in my part of the world (we’ve been fighting — real — fires). To judge by this comment stream, it went well.

      Do you PPers, not the MSM, think it proved its point?

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 1:38pm

      #38
      robie robinson

      robie robinson

      Status: Gold Member

      Joined: Aug 25 2009

      Posts: 932

      4+

      Robie’s view

      never felt more safe in such a crowd as was present.

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 2:37pm

      Reply to #37

      thc0655

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 27 2010

      Posts: 1806

      4+

      Define “success”

      I’m thrilled there was no false flag violence or violence between protesters and left wing counter- protesters. The MSM will be busy continuing to spin the rally as an extremist event, but nothing that could’ve happened would’ve prevented that. They’re being paid to push a narrative, not report the news. Governor Blackface Babykiller and the Democrats in the legislature already knew when they started pushing their new people-control measures that there was massive opposition outside of their geographically small enclaves. If there is to be any more “success,” which I doubt, then maybe the legislators will back down after seeing that their neighbors aren’t going to roll over and play dead like the voters in NJ, CA, MD, CT and other states have. That would be a reasonable outcome, but I’m not optimistic enough to hope for reasonableness.

      I have $5 that says the agitator in this video is a VA State Trooper.

      https://pjmedia.com/trending/antifa-infiltrator-gun-rally-goers-turn-on-protester-who-suggests-violence/

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Mon, Jan 20, 2020 - 3:53pm

      #39

      thc0655

      Status: Platinum Member

      Joined: Apr 27 2010

      Posts: 1806

      2+

      Ironies in Richmond

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Tue, Jan 21, 2020 - 12:39pm

      #40
      agitating prop

      agitating prop

      Status: Silver Member

      Joined: May 28 2009

      Posts: 340

      4+

      Kman--"Seattle is Dying"

      I watched the documentary twice, just after it came out. It doesn’t square with what I know of the city. So, I did some research on it.

      https://newsregister.com/article?articleTitle=seattle-isn-t-dying-but-homeless-documentary-is–1556860805–33093–

      McMinnville definitely has a problem. So does Seattle.

      However, neither city is dying. Not even close.

      Poverty and homelessness are nothing new in the Pacific Northwest. After all, the term “skid row,” a corruption of the skid road used by loggers, originated in Seattle.

      To insist Seattle is dying isn’t journalism. It’s fear-mongering.

      Johnson started with a thesis and built his documentary to support that thesis. That’s not honest journalism.

      However, he apparently comes by his views “honestly,” based on the reputation of KOMO’s corporate parent.

      Sinclair, controlled by the family of founder Julian Sinclair Smith, is the largest television operator in the U.S. Its 193 stations populate more than 40 percent of American households, particularly in the South and Midwest.

      Sinclair Broadcast is best known for engaging in questionable business practices, currying favor with the Trump administration and imposing its conservative political orientation on its legions of viewers. That led a former Federal Communications Commission chair, from the Bush administration no less, to dub it “the most dangerous U.S. company most people have never heard of.”

      Login or Register to post comments

    • Tue, Jan 21, 2020 - 12:46pm

      #41
      agitating prop

      agitating prop

      Status: Silver Member

      Joined: May 28 2009

      Posts: 340

      2+

      The same conservative nimby’s who oppose affordable housing, through upzoning, in their precious single family home neighbourhoods, just eat up the idea that the homeless are basically different than you and I, are character flawed and defecate in the streets.

      As far as sleeping in a homeless shelter rather than living in a tent on the street, what would all those critical of sidewalk tenting prefer?  If they were in the same predicament you can bet they’d choose the tent. I would. Shelters are dangerous and more dehumanizing than tenting.

      Login or Register to post comments

    Login or Register to post comments