29 Creative Ways To Give Kitchen Trash A Second Life

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Sat, Jan 24, 2015 - 8:03pm

29 Creative Ways To Give Kitchen Trash A Second Life

Some of these are new, but I've tried many of their suggestions, such as regrowing celery , carrots or pineapple from the parts you cut off, and putting fresh veggies in the brine of an empty pickle jar for new pickles (that only works once, by the way.)

3 Comments

esusannewh's picture
esusannewh
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 11 2012
Posts: 3
29 creative ways to give kitchn trash a second life

Hi Wendy,

These are really creative ways to up-cycle. 

were you able to eat the veggies that you regrew?  that idea could come in handy in hard times. 

a long time ago, a friend of mine did regrow a pineapple top; it turned into a nice succulent houseplant.  she also regrew avocados but they also ended up as houseplants--not edible. 

once, an avocado seed in my compost grew (volunteered) into a wonderful tree over a period of a few years.  since there wasn't any other avocado tree for cross pollination, it never produced avocados but did fine as a nice tree (& grew in the Pacific Northwest, which isn't really avocado-land).

Do you have any special household hints or up-cycle things you do yourself?

Susanne

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
several tips

esusannewh, we have several tips.

  • Store-bought ginger is pathetically easy to grow in a pot. It just keeps growing and growing, and you harvest as needed.
  • If any potato eyes or other seeds sprout at the edges of our compost pile, we just plant 'em in the garden.
  • A local sawmill was offering cedar end cuts--the outside of the tree with bark--as free firewood. We use them as insect-proof edges to our raised beds.
  • We shoved a couple of box fans in our gables as gable fans. Cheap, and easy to change out.
  • I have not bought a new computer in four years; hubby has not bought a new computer in 25+ years, and he's never bought a new monitor. Yet what he has is still state-of-the-art. Learn how to fix broken ones on YouTube and in forums. He even jailbroke demo Kindles into working ones! Learn how to keep electronics out of landfills, and save money.
  • Same thing goes for repairing appliances. We just spent $30 on something that would have cost $300 to replace. Again. if you are the least bit mechanical it's all on YouTube.
  • We also repaired a broken water main coming into our house - ridiculously easy! But a plumber would have changed a couple of hundred bucks. How is this upcycling? We used better parts and donated the excess to Habitat for Humanity's Re-Store.
  • When my husband shaves (his neck and around his beard) he uses a straight razor. You need a good-quality one, and a leather strop, but he has not bought a razor in 8 years. Not so much upcycling as just plain sustainable.
esusannewh's picture
esusannewh
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 11 2012
Posts: 3
Several Tips

Hi Wendy,

thanks for sharing your tips.  they are very creative. 

in our little low income town, we have several thrift stores, a shoe repair store, and an appliance repair shop that also sells refurbished appliances.  we bought a refurbished washer that works great.  and we get our shoes repaired at the shoe shop.  i find good used clothing, flat sheets, and fabric at the thrift shops. 

i have a vintage (all metal) sewing machine that a friend converted to treadle for me.  the machine uses round bobbins (much easier to deal with than the old long bobbins), does zigzag and reverse.  i use it to mend, darn, re-purpose, and sew clothing and other cloth items.  it is a very strong machine that can sew heavy duty work jeans. 

as times get harder, my plan is to offer my services in helping others maintain their clothing and cloth items.  i'm building my skills in darning (both by hand and machine), making patterns from finished clothes, altering clothing, repairing/patching jeans, making and mending bedding (like making flat sheets into fitted sheets) etc.  since i'm in my early 60s and disabled, it makes sense to develop skills within my capacities that can help my family as well as others. 

sewing on a non-electric machine makes sense.  and it doesn't seem like many people have figured out yet how important sewing could be.  as more people have less $$, they will probably need their clothes repaired or re-purposed rather than replacing them. 

thanks again for sharing your tips.  i will show them to my husband and see how many of them we can do, too.

--Susanne

 

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