VIDEO: Chris' Take on Ferguson & Ukraine

Adam Taggart
By Adam Taggart on Thu, Aug 21, 2014 - 3:06pm

Chris posts a brief video update to Peak Prosperity's YouTube channel each week. This week's video focuses on the bad policies and bad decision-making that has led to the unrest in Ferguson and Ukraine:

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23 Comments

HughK's picture
HughK
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The bear in the background

Is the guy (frontiersman? soldier?) fighting the bear on the shelf in the background just coincidence?  :)

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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That bear in the background
HughK wrote:

Is the guy (frontiersman? soldier?) fighting the bear on the shelf in the background just coincidence?  :)

My family comes from a long line of bankers.  Once upon a time banks used to give away various offerings for opening up a bank account.

When my grandfather finally passed away and the family went through his house putting those little colored stickers on the things they wanted, I was the only one to claim the 'shoot a  bear bank.'

How could not want that?

You put a penny or nickel in the Davy Crockett gun, pull the trigger and it goes down the bear's throat.

 

 

thc0655's picture
thc0655
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I have an idea

Actually, I have two ideas.  Let's do what Chris suggests here.  Let's set up some kind of citizen review to make sure the police aren't letting themselves get away with murder.  

First, let's set up a system whereby private citizens (not government agents: prosecutors and police) get to hear all the preliminary evidence and decide whether or not charges should be filed against police officers. This will go a long way toward keeping the police on their best behavior.  If they don't abide by the law, civilians on this civilian oversight board can charge them with crimes.  This would be especially useful when the community is inflamed about a certain event, don't trust the police, and are very eager to make sure justice is done.  Let's call this civilian oversight board a "Grand Jury."

Second, let's set up a system whereby private citizens get the final say about a fellow citizen's guilt after government charges have been brought and a trial heard.  The government can put on its best case but this civilian review board would make the final decision about guilt or innocence.  Let's draw these citizens from the community in an objective way (nearly everybody gets to or has to serve from time to time) and give both the prosecutors and the defense attorneys the opportunity to question the potential citizen reviewers and reject any they believe might be biased at a trial.  Let's say that the number of civilian reviewers will be 12 and that all it takes to stop a government prosecution from improperly finding a citizen guilty is for one of those civilian reviewers to vote "not guilty."  This will protect us citizens from being railroaded by false charges put forward by the police or prosecutors.  Let's call this the "Jury System."

Now, I admit there appears to be a potential weakness in the two systems I have suggested here.  The big question is: Are police officers citizens or not?  Because if they are, the Grand Jury and the Jury System may give them too much protection when we know they are guilty.  What I mean is that the Grand Jury might decide after hearing the preliminary evidence NOT to charge a certain police officer with a crime.  And worst of all, even if the police officer is charged and taken to trial, the Jury System might protect him from being found guilty.  After all, it would only take one resolute citizen juror to vote not guilty to save the police officer from being convicted of a crime we all know he committed.  And nobody wants police officers hiding behind their Constitutional rights in order to get away with a murder we know they committed.

What do you guys think?

Tom

 

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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Interesting idea...
thc0655 wrote:

Actually, I have two ideas.  Let's do what Chris suggests here.  Let's set up some kind of citizen review to make sure the police aren't letting themselves get away with murder.  

First, let's set up a system whereby private citizens (not government agents: prosecutors and police) get to hear all the preliminary evidence and decide whether or not charges should be filed against police officers. This will go a long way toward keeping the police on their best behavior.  If they don't abide by the law, civilians on this civilian oversight board can charge them with crimes.  This would be especially useful when the community is inflamed about a certain event, don't trust the police, and are very eager to make sure justice is done.  Let's call this civilian oversight board a "Grand Jury."

(...)

In this intriguing system of yours, how exactly would this 'grand jury' be convened?  Who gets to make that decision?

:)

thc0655's picture
thc0655
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More police excessive use of force

A couple of days ago Philly PD gets a report of a man with a gun.  Two police vehicles go to the location and there they see a male matching the description.  All four get out of their vehicles and the male begins shooting at the officers, striking one in the head (a graze wound).  All four officers return fire, killing the male (identified as David Ellis).

Yesterday, there's a rally in Philly in sympathy for the protesters in Ferguson, MO.  One of the Philly protesters is the mother of the recently deceased David Ellis.  Watch her, her friends and her supporters claim the officers used excessive force in killing her son.  Fortunately, there were no riots in behalf of David Ellis (so far).

You can't make this stuff up.

http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Mom-of-Slain-Suspect-Accused-of-Shooting-Police-Officer-Attends-Ferguson-Rally-271929401.html

Tom

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Race vs Public Voice

I feel like society's frustration about not having a representative democracy, and not having a voice that their government acknowledges, is being confused with racism.  White Americans have frustrations and struggles associated with having no say in their government.  Obviously that's different from police brutality, but it's similar, and the solutions are related.  Both races have a common enemy, but we are being pitted against one another instead of focusing on the true problem. 

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Theater of the absurd
thc0655 wrote:

Yesterday, there's a rally in Philly in sympathy for the protesters in Ferguson, MO.  One of the Philly protesters is the mother of the recently deceased David Ellis.  Watch her, her friends and her supporters claim the officers used excessive force in killing her son.  Fortunately, there were no riots in behalf of David Ellis (so far).

You can't make this stuff up.

Almost without exception, the mother states that "he was a good boy".  And usually, a short time later, Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton show up to further attest to the deceased's character. 

Just once I wish the mother would have the courage and character to say,

"He was my son and I loved him but he made a terrible mistake and unfortunately, he paid for the mistake with his life.  I just hope that others can learn from my personal tragedy and not repeat the mistake my son made."

But I'm dreaming.

Arthur Robey's picture
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Convoy completes Mission.

So there are Heroes in the world.

Despite the White House Orifice demanding that they cease and desist.

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A Little Balance in the Ferguson Story Would Be Nice

Let's not forget that the youth was strangling a store owner when alleged excessive force was used.  At the least, every protester should be saying, "yes I know that Michael shouldn't have been actively using excessive force in the commission of a felony, but..."  If the MSM chooses to air a clip where the alleged victim's mother says he was a good boy, they should perhaps follow the clip with a list of the alleged victims arrests and, in this case, a clip of the store owner describing the incident.

We live in a society where African American youth play the "knockout game" for entertainment, where 84 people were shot in Chicago on July 4th weekend alone and where the Mayor of Detroit is encouraging residents to own guns.

I would agree that this is a racial issue.  But part of the racial issue is that there are races that don't appear to raise the majority of their youth to be non violent, responsible citizens and to respect the property and personal rights of others.  It is simply not racial profiling to notice the obvious evidence that the youth of a specific race are more of a risk to your person than those of other races.  It's no more profiling that noticing the potential risk difference between a rattle snake and a garden snake.  It's simply a necessary survival skill.  

Perhaps the police officer felt, based on past experience, that he was more at risk trying to confront an African American youth committing a crime than he would a youth of another race.  I'm certainly glad I'm not a cop in a troubled neighborhood.

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thc0655
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Interesting take by firebrand Brandon Smith

Interesting take on Ferguson (and the whole country) by firebrand Brandon Smith.  In part he writes:

If the citizens of Ferguson (and the rest of America) really want to erase this conundrum from their lives permanently, they are going to have to establish neighborhood watches and even community “militias” (there’s the dreaded “M” word again) to bring peace to their town.

By refusing to take responsibility for their own security, Ferguson residents have invited city and state LEOs to do the job for them, and this has resulted in the possibility of unwarranted death-by-cop. Ferguson residents can and should remove LEO presence by establishing their own security. But this means they would have to stop the looting by petty thugs using protests as cover, and it also means they would have to prevent or intervene in criminal activities of less honorable residents.

The Founding Fathers answered the question of “who watches the watchmen” by creating a system by which the people ARE the watchmen. This was the militia system, a system that the federal government now labels “domestic extremism” and violent escalation.

I agree that if the people would take responsibility for their own security, there would be fewer abuses by law enforcement.  Read the whole piece:

http://www.alt-market.com/articles/2290-when-anti-government-violence-erupts-who-is-really-at-fault

Tom

Doug's picture
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Brandon Smith

As I have discussed at length elsewhere on this blog, Brandon Smith tells his readers what he wants them to hear, regardless of truth, and will ban people who disagree with him from the site no matter how well documented or how reasonably presented the disagreer's argument is.  Data based discussion is not an option.

Doug

cmartenson's picture
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Refusing To Live In Fear

I applaud the idea of citizens taking greater responsibility for their own safety and security.  That too would be a nice step.

But one big part of the unfortunate over reaction to 9/11 was a peddling of a culture of fear that a lot of people bought into, especially many police departments.

Consider this recent example of a university employee walking across campus with an umbrella eliciting this response:

SWAT team responds to college staff member carrying umbrella

8/22/14 A SWAT team on the campus of California State University San Marcos surrounded a staff member equipped with protective rain gear this week.

The incident, which occurred early Wednesday morning, was prompted by a call to the San Diego County Sheriff’s office of a bald white male, wearing a black shirt and jeans and walking across campus carrying a rifle. This resulted in a shelter-in place order for some 400 staff and students going through orientation before the start of the fall session. Rapidly, facility and classmates banded together to barricade doors with tables and chairs, expecting the worst.

The situation resolved itself after 30 minutes when an umbrella-bearing teacher figured out he matched the description of the alleged gunman and surrendered to law enforcement.

When your first response is to arrive in force with machine guns (I'm guessing several of those are full automatics), and your training says to point them in every direction, you are one twitchy finger away from an accident.  And who exactly is the circled guy pointing his gun at?

The stance and positioning of that squad in the picture is appropriate for a checkpoint in Falluja after a threat has been identified.  But for a guy on a campus holding an umbrella who turned himself in?  Not so much.

But my larger point centers on the immediate lockdown of the school, certainly raising the level of fear for those locked in.  Then there's the obvious level of fear baked into a squad that believes their job and safety requires them to point machine guns in every direction.

Just consider the impact that has on both them and anybody watching them.  It is a culture of fear.  It screams out, I'm desperately afraid and would almost certainly shoot first and ask question later.

I actively refuse to buy into this culture of fear, and do not fret or stress about gunmen or terrorists or anything else I am supposed to fear.  But I do worry about authorities that are trained to overreact.  I confess, it bothers me mainly because it fosters a culture of separation (us vs. them) and fear, neither of which are much fun to live around.

ommm's picture
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These 2 graphics from ZH summarize the magnitude of the problem

20140822_copkillers_0.jpg

ommm's picture
ommm
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Black cop kills an innocent white man

What does the MSM have to say?

And where are the riots?

http://freedomoutpost.com/2014/08/black-cop-killed-innocent-white-man-ut...

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cmartenson wrote:I applaud
cmartenson wrote:

I applaud the idea of citizens taking greater responsibility for their own safety and security.  That too would be a nice step.

But one big part of the unfortunate over reaction to 9/11 was a peddling of a culture of fear that a lot of people bought into, especially many police departments.

The loss of life on 9/11 was painful.  The loss of freedom that followed was, in the long run, far worse.  Homeland Security, the TSA and the Patriot Act are contemptible developments in a "free" country.

I never for one second believed that the US could secure complete safety for every citizen, nor did I ask them to protect me in that manner.

If you want to call this country the land of the free, then let me walk onto a plane without taking off my shoes and belt and being subject to a full body wand and frisk process.  Let me send an email or make a phone call without knowing that the NSA is filtering what I say through a program looking for key words.  The final insult is that we are involuntarily paying for this abuse with our taxes.  

I'd gladly risk the possibility of a terrorist event to regain such freedom as I once had, or at least believed that I had.

 

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Freedom v Security

I completely agree with you, Les.  It's almost as if the 9/11 hijackers ended up "winning."  Not only did they murder lots of Americans but moreover, they dramatically changed our way of life in this country (for the worse) and prompted us to waste substantial lives, limbs and dollars in our poorly executed responses in Iraq and Afghanistan.  (As an active duty officer from 1991-2011, that's particularly appalling to me.)

The big question to me is just how many people in this country feel this same way?  Are the majority happy to give up so much of their freedom for a bit more security?

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Lockdowns: Mas vale morir de pie

My international school - which is private - now does lockdown drills.  I don't know if the US Embassy here in Switzerland requested that we start doing them, or if someone here decided we needed to do them, but I believe it was the former.  

In such a drill, we have to lock the doors to our classrooms, turn off all of the lights and ask the students to get under their desks/tables.

I wonder how many teachers or administrators here are doing the calculus of the cost of imposing this type of fear versus the benefit of (possibly) being safer in a situation where a gunner is loose in the school.

My mom recalls the nuclear attack drills they did in her California elementary school in the 1950's.  Everyone got under their desks and put their coats over their heads.  Was this to protect them from thermonuclear explosions or to forward the agenda of politicians that benefited from extreme fear of Communism?

Maybe instead of teaching our children to cower on the floor we should teach them about Emiliano Zapata's view on this topic:

Better to die on your feet than live on your knees.

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Collective Insanity

Hugh:  My wife is an elementary school librarian in a suburban town in New England.  Several years ago she told me of a drill they had been taught and were required to practice which sounds similar.  The only difference was that she was required to gather all the children into a group in one corner of the room and huddle there. I remember remarking that such a configuration would only make it easier for someone to shoot them all.  If you read the reports of the Newtown, Connecticut school shooting it appears the teachers had been instructed to follow the same drill.

I am probably a good deal older than most of you in PP.  I remember huddling under my desk and against  the school gymnasium wall during the Cuban missal Crisis. (Even as an eight year old I did not believe such actions would help.)

I took a trip to Washington when I was in college. I needed to meet up with a friend working in the city and the most convenient place we both could get to was the Capitol.  We met in the rotunda. There were security guards, but I remember walking up the steps into the building with no metal detector, no search of my backpack.  I stood around looking at the murals on the ceiling for ten minutes until my friend arrived. Try getting into the Capitol today.  A very different process.  We have given up much to supposedly be "protected."

JT

PS Chris, I think your analysis of the Ukraine situation needs to be sent to everyone in Congress and at the State Department. They just don;t seem to get it (or they are deliberately not getting it for other purposes.)

ommm's picture
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How to avoid conflict with the police

A heads up for citizens of future Fergusons

macro2682's picture
macro2682
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Planes and militias...

Phelps,

taking off your shoes to get on a plane isn't a knock to our freedom.  Flying through the air at 400mph is more of a privilege.

Also, to your previous comment... Race is the most apparent differentiator when talking about violence, gangs, and incarceration rates, but let's not forget that this is more of a socio-economic issue coupled with fear.  I don't believe as you do that black families are "raising the majority of their youth" to be violent and disrespectful.  Black people are human beings, who love their kids, and want the best for them.  They are being raised to the best of their parent's ability given their respective circumstances.  If poor black youth are raised to fear police, it is no surprise that many will chose violence when they come of age.  Poor white kids are less likely to fear the police.  You don't get stopped for being poor and white.  Profiling is a big part of the problem, but even if we fixed that, it would appear to get worse before it got better.  Have you ever met a dog who was raised to fear humans?  Whose fault is it when that dog bites someone?  The dog?  Or the very first humans who mistreat them?  This is just an example (please don't jump down my throat for using it), the point is that black youth are raised by society (not just parents) to fear the police.  It should be no surprise that those kids would treat police differently when confronted in adulthood.  

Yes, White people have valid reasons for learning their fear of blacks.  But I think it's on us to accept the discomfort and put down our guard.

... Oh, and about militias.  Don't forget what happened the last time a neighborhood watchman thought he was a police officer.  Another unarmed kid was killed.

 

 

 

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
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And Here it Comes. $1.4Bn "Lifeline" For Ukraine.

On cue.

I'll pick out the juicy bits for you.

“Under the IMF's articles of agreement, it [IMF] is not allowed to lend money to a country that is unable to pay,” Michael Hudson, Wall Street analyst told RT. “The repayment of these demands is going to cause the Ukrainian currency to fall way down...the economy will be killed under the condition of this loan.”

and

To receive the IMF funds, Kiev opted for severe austerity program that includes getting rid of 24,000 government jobs, withdrawing subsidies on natural gas, raising taxes, and selling off state assets.

"Dun", as they say in these here parts, "like a dinner."

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
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Extra nationals join the fracas.

All sorts of people are joining the Russians in the Ukraine. Let us hope that they are real professionals and go gentle on the Ukrainian Conscripts. Mercenaries can be bought off. (Isn't Capitalism wonderful?)

I turned the sound off on the video and watched the French soldiers' eyes. There was only one who was looking around. I would pick him. Further if they did not have someone behind the camera looking behind them there might be a problem.

They did have the truck behind them so that they were not completely out in the open- but still there was not enough cover.

I guess the cameraman bunched them together like that. (Not pretty)

Wakey, wakey boys. And good luck.

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Bankers Slave
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East Ukraine resistance fightback interview

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