Essential Tools for the Home Gardener

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Thu, Dec 5, 2013 - 10:14pm

What do you consider to be the most useful tools for your kitchen garden? Here's a list of mine; add your own suggestions in the comments.

  1. hand trowel - good for planting, weeding, mixing in compost
  2. hand rake - excellent for raking out pulled weeds, leaves, and debris. Also good for planting things like lettuce seeds that get a light coating of soil: use the knuckle or the flat of the fork to loosen the top layer of soil, then cover the seeds.
  3. salad spinner - makes it easy to build a clean and healthy home-grown salad
  4. mandolin slicer - great for slicing things for canning or sun drying
  5. wheelbarrow - for bringing in new soil, compost, or large plants, and taking old ones to the compost pile
  6. electric tiller - good enough to break up lawns for more productive land use.
  7. flat-bladed shovel - we can turn soil to the very bottom of our raised beds without damaging the hardware cloth we stapled to the bottoms (to deter moles).
  8. Water-bath canner - to preserve much of what you grow and "taste a little of the summer" in the winter.
  9. Sun-drying rack - another way to preserve food like sun-dried tomatoes or dried figs.

7 Comments

marknclaire's picture
marknclaire
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 3 2013
Posts: 3
I'd have to add

my food saver vacuum sealer. I can seal my jars with it, too. I finally broke down and bought one this year and don't know how I lived without it so long.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1148
hook-n-crook hoe

the absolutely best

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1148
hook-n-crook hoe

the absolutely best

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1148
pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2008
Posts: 2237
An early Christmas present!

Thanks for the tip; Robie!  I just ordered myself an early Christmas present!:)

It's funny, in the past -before starting to transition to a more resilient lifestyle- I would have been very hesitant to spend much money for a gardening tool (this costs $54+ S/H). Now?  I look at this as a solid investment, one that will reduce the work I have to do to achieve that resilient lifestyle (or at least make that work easier!), and is less subject to losing value like currencies and stocks and bonds may.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1148
Have had one

for two or three years. bought on a friends advice and have been well pleased. the blade has remained sharp whereas my colinear hoe has....well.....

We're breaking in a new milk cow (first frshening heifer)itsgonnabe a longmorning  robie

Hladini's picture
Hladini
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 28 2011
Posts: 83
My Indespensables

My gardening list of must haves includes lots of cardboard, bales of straw/hay, and lots of compost.  I am gardening just under an acre of land and we prep our beds without tilling or hand turning the soil - we use cardboard then cover it with compost for the beds and other organic material for the pathways (leaf litter, wood mulch, straw/hay, or any thing else we happen to have on hand..... like the okra bushes we pulled). 

When we weed, we mostly use the "chop and drop" method - leaving root systems in the ground to decompose and build the soil. 

Love this new life!

 

 

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