Oklahoma City Tornado

Adam Taggart
By Adam Taggart on Mon, May 20, 2013 - 7:57pm

A huge 2-mile wide tornado ripped through Oklahoma City today. It was estimated to be on the scale of the most-powerful tornado in recorded history.

Early counts have at least 37 reported dead, two dozen of which, sadly, were third graders from the suburb of Moore. That count is expected to rise as emergency teams continue to comb through the rubble.

The devastation looks atomic:

Our thoughts go out to those affected by this disaster. We hope our Peak Prosperity readers in the Oklahoma City area are safe. Please let us know so here, as well as anything the greater PP.com community may be able to do to help in the relief efforts getting underway (donation of food/money/blood, volunteering, etc)

Note: If you're reading this and are not yet a member of Peak Prosperity's EmergencyWatch Group, please consider joining it now. It's where our active community helps each other prepare for & prevent emergencies, and come together in support & service when we can't.. Simply go here and click the "Join Today" button.

13 Comments

BeingThere's picture
BeingThere
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 7 2013
Posts: 56
Lack of Tornado Preparations

Early in the day I heard that this tornado was expected to go through Ok. As a New Yorker I wonder why no plans were made to get people and their children out of harm's way.

Why were kids in school and people working?

Why were they not evacuated if their housing and lack of shelters would not withstand the force of winds?

Community might be a strong asset here, but it cannot suffice against a lack of civic action and I'm wondering when the people of this country will stop fighting some of the best things government can provide. We will see what kind of aid these people will need and whether FEMA will have a strong part in that.

Where does the ideology end? Will they dig in their heels and say they don't need a nanny state?  Prayer is the only answer? Will they admit there is climate change?

Stay tuned for the next episode of a country going down. Some writer called this a few years ago, "As the World Burns."

MarkM's picture
MarkM
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 22 2008
Posts: 837
Evacuation

Tornadoes are spotty, erratic and not predictable. Evacuation is impractical. Sheltering in place is the only viable option. If people living in tornado zones were to evacuate every time a warning is put out, a lot of time would be spent waiting in lines of trafiic. Not the most desirable place to be when one hits. Most tornado warnings result in...not much.

Maybe Bloomberg could come on down and mandate tornado shelters for everyone with significant fines for non-compliance. If I were a New Yorker, I would think of getting out of harm's way by leaving New York.

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3124
no time
BeingThere wrote:

Early in the day I heard that this tornado was expected to go through Ok. As a New Yorker I wonder why no plans were made to get people and their children out of harm's way.

Why were kids in school and people working?

Why were they not evacuated if their housing and lack of shelters would not withstand the force of winds?

Community might be a strong asset here, but it cannot suffice against a lack of civic action and I'm wondering when the people of this country will stop fighting some of the best things government can provide. We will see what kind of aid these people will need and whether FEMA will have a strong part in that.

Where does the ideology end? Will they dig in their heels and say they don't need a nanny state?  Prayer is the only answer? Will they admit there is climate change?

Stay tuned for the next episode of a country going down. Some writer called this a few years ago, "As the World Burns."

Having lived in 'tornado alley' for a significant portion of my life, I think I can at least partially answer your questions.  Tornados are fairly random and impossible to pinpoint ahead of time.  There are frequent tornado watches and warnings during the season, but few ever actually hit a specific location.  If people started evacuating or moving to safer locations every time there is a warning, there would be traffic gridlock leaving people in their cars really exposed to twisters. 

The strategy when I was a kid out there was to listen for the sound of a freight train bearing down on you and head for the nearest shelter (i.e. basement or ditch or culvert if caught out in the open).

They aren't like hurricanes that have widespread impact and are predictable days in advance.

Doug

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3124
Mark

Ha, thanks for the verification.  BTW, NY is pretty safe from tornadoes. ;^)

Doug

BeingThere's picture
BeingThere
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 7 2013
Posts: 56
Tornado redux

Yes, indeed folks NYC is safe from Tornadoes.

There is an area for discussion that doesn't go to Bloomberg's fines. There is a good argument for  coordinated effort by local civic groups, local govt planning in cooperation with the citizens who live in dangerous zones.

How many times does this have to happen with no new planning from the mid-'90's to now?

Really, there's absolutly no answers? Will climate change be part of the discussion?

Or is it just God's will?

(time to go to work)

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2219
NYC safe from tornados?

Suburban Westchester (Elmsford) had a tornado just a few years back.  Granted, we're not in Tornado Alley, but don't jinx me bro!

 

Viva -- Sager

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2367
Tornados/Safety

Tornados can strike literally anywhere - so unlike Hurricanes, there is no place that's "safe" from experiencing the phenomenon. However, tornados like this require a few things that exist in spades in the Midwest, and in lower quantities elsewhere in the world. As a not-so-fun fact, More Tornados strike the American Midwest than anywhere else on Earth.

Trying to predict Tornados is a bit like trying to predict car wrecks. You can identify problem areas, and take notice when the cars are moving too fast, but you can't pin-point where they'll end up, nor whether it'll be a fender-bender or a 70 car pile up. 

When the conditions are right, you can issue watchs or warnings - but the most important thing is that people have faith in your predicitions, and act accordingly. The two almost never coincide...

My thoughts and prayers go out to all impacted by this tragedy.

Aaron

ckessel's picture
ckessel
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 12 2008
Posts: 465
Tornados and Kenesian Economics

"Tornados can strike literally anywhere - so unlike Hurricanes, there is no place that's "safe" from experiencing the phenomenon."

I think this is also true of our current experiment with our fiat currency system and Kenesian economics in general. 

Now ...... where and when will our next crises strike????  My antenna says that the likelihood that Chris and Adam have a pretty correct 'weather forcast' in the making is spot on! 

I'm using the recent pound down in PMs to do a little more stacking!!!  Cheers.

Coop

ckessel's picture
ckessel
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 12 2008
Posts: 465
Hi Sager, Let's just cut to

Hi Sager,

Let's just cut to the chase and know that the USA should now be referred to as 'Kenesian Alley' !

Coop

rhare's picture
rhare
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 30 2009
Posts: 1323
Tornados everywhere

Poet posted a couple of relevant graphics a few days ago in the "Where to Live in the US" topic on the Relocation-USA Group. I'm reposting them here:

and

 

 

jdye51's picture
jdye51
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 16 2011
Posts: 157
Bob!

Thanks for the maps. Where have you been?!!

Joyce

Tim_P's picture
Tim_P
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 23 2009
Posts: 298
Government is not the answer

The best things provided by the government after a tornado of the type that hit Oklahoma is rescue and support.  The government cannot stop tornados.  The government can specify what type of construction is used in public buildings and they did that in Oklahoma.  Many schools now have safe areas built in as part of the design, but the elementary school that was hit was a older school.  It's said to cost $10 million dollars to retrofit a school and the government is not coming up with the cash to do them all, so the older schools are still vulnerable.

The best thing to have in the case of a tornado like this is a strong community.  A strong community will come together to rebuild itself were as a dependant community will sit back and wait for someone to rebuild for them.  I have a lot of admiration for the folks that live in that part of the country.  They pick themselves up, rebuild and continue on with life.  This is not like a brush fire that takes out a community that will not protect itself if it costs them their view.  You cannot create rules that will protect homes like you can with brush clearing rules in brush fire country.

Tornados, earthquakes, hurricanes, fires and blizzards are some of the hazzards of life.  There are few places in the world that are not subject to some form of disaster.  The best defense is a strong community that can pick up after the disaster and move on with life.  A community that looks to the government to protect itself will see the effects last years longer than a community that has the mindset to take care of themselves.

Adam Taggart's picture
Adam Taggart
Status: Peak Prosperity Co-founder (Online)
Joined: May 26 2009
Posts: 2934
Two updates

Fortunately, the number of elementary school children killed by the tornado has been revised downward, from 25 to approximately 7. Still a horrible tragedy, but less worse than initially feared.

For those discussing what sort of warning was provided, the city of Moore, OK (the worst hit by the tornado) did receive warning 36 minutes in advance (the national average is 14 mintues). It's 36 tornado sirens sounded 3 times before the tornado hit -- undoubtedly saving lives.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments