local example: Palm Bay, FL church community garden

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Thu, May 16, 2013 - 8:43pm

Today I visited the garden behind the Riviera United Church of Christ, in Palm Bay, Florida. The church members donate all produce to a homeless shelter, and in the process are learning food gardening in their climate. Should times get tougher, they own twelve acres behind this large garden.

What follows is a photo essay describing some of the crops, methods and points of interest.

zucchini and squash on trellis

tomatoes

beets

green bell peppers

eggplant

These were just some of what they are growing, which also included onions, turnips, radishes, and more. Proving that just about any material will hold a raised garden bed, here the raised portions of the soil are held in by cinderblocks and ornamental pavers.

And they did not neglect perennials. They've planted two fig trees, blackberries, a banana grove and a pineapple grove.

banana grove

one of the pineapples

I suggested they plant olives and nuts: oils, fats and proteins are important, too. I also recommended sweet potatoes for this climate. But this was still a shining example of community gardening doing good and teaching 

Today I visited the garden behind the Riviera United Church of Christ, in Palm Bay, Florida. The church members donate all produce to a homeless shelter, and in the process are learing food gardening in their climate. Should times get tougher, they own twelve acres behind this large garden.

What follows is a photo essay describing some of the crops, methods and points of interest.

zucchini and squash on trellis

tomatoes

beets

green bell peppers

eggplant

These were just some of waht they are growing, which also included onions, turnips, radishes, and more. Proving that just about any material will hold a raised garden bed, here the raised portions of the soil are held in by cinderblocks and ornamental pavers.

And they did not neglect perennials. They've planted two fig trees, blackberries, a banana grove and a pineapple grove.

banana grove

one of the pineapples

I suggested they plant olives and nuts: oils, fats and proteins are important, too. I also recommended sweet potatoes for this climate. But this was still a shining example of community gardening doing good and teaching resilliency.

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1 Comment

Thrivalista's picture
Thrivalista
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 5 2011
Posts: 60
Good start, what about "group culture"?

Interesting to see that some of the plants are in the shade. I understand tomatoes are a shade-loving perennial in their land of origin, Mexico. And if they let those green bell peppers ripen to red (or whatever) before picking, they'll have about 100 times the vitamin C of the green. Be less problematic for folks with arthritis, too.

It might be good to actually start growing more crops now, for sharing with church members and others, so they establish patterns and habits of sharing, fairness, etc. Cultivate those behaviors before things get any harder, so there are practices and expectations to stand them in good stead when things get more turbulent and chaotic. Yes, even church members are not impervious to good behavior breaking down under stress...;)

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