Group Hellos & Greetings

Ken in MA
By Ken in MA on Mon, Mar 18, 2013 - 4:17pm

Hello everyone,
Welcome to the Rowe 2013 discussion group.  I'm Ken... and treebeard and I will be here as (I hope) helpful stewards of our online community to give a hand to anyone that has questions or needs help.

What a group. I enjoyed the weekend with all of you - those I had the chance to meet and those who I only got to know from your contributions during the seminar.  Chris & Becca, Adam, Amanda -- thanks for flying this flag and sharing your lives in a way which brings people together and supports us all in the challenges likely lying ahead.

Group members - you can add your welcomes, hellos, and thoughts fresh from the weekend to this discussion thread by posting in the 'Post New Comment' section below.  Also, if you have a new topic you'd like to bring into the group, we welcome you to start a new Discussion.

Ken.

 

 

18 Comments

ponytail_guy's picture
ponytail_guy
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Posts: 8
Can you move my post?

Ken-

Didn't know how to add a coment before- can you move my first post over to this thread?

Thanks!

Marc

[No problem, Marc. I've moved it over here and deleted your earlier post. -- Adam]

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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Thank you everyone!

That was a very special weekend and I am tired today, to be sure, but also quite energized by the event.

So hello again, and I am glad to see this group having some activity.  

I will post the slides I delivered on Sunday morning on the hows, whys and whens of communicating as soon as I can to this group. 

On the not-wanted-or expected list is the fairly major snowstorm moving through here over the next couple of days.  Ugh.  This is the hard part of winter in this region.  On the plus side, when I got home all of my seeds had sprouted nicely and so I am not without green.

ponytail_guy's picture
ponytail_guy
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Greetings!

 

Greetings!

Just wanted to check in and say how much I enjoyed the experience. I came with high expectations and they were exceeded! The presentations were of much greater depth than the expected re-hash of the "Crash Course" and I had many interesting and informative conversations with other attendees.

My Significant Other warned me that I might be pressure-sold into buying some expensive service or product at this event; it seems that the end result is somewhat "worse" as I feel "voluntarily conscripted" into an important movement!

(My name is Marc, from Connecticut, and I chose the moniker "ponytail_guy" as a memory aid for those whom I met and spoke with. I may want to change it in future if it seems too "goofy")

So thanks to Chris and Becca and Adam and Amanda, and the folks at Rowe Camp, and all of you for what you did and what you shared!

Marc

treebeard's picture
treebeard
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Energized

What a weekend, very energizing.  Grateful to evryone who particiapated and of course to Chris, Becca, Adam and Amanda for making the experience possible.  It is so wonerful to have real faces and people to connect to behind these bits and bytes on the screen.

Now my optimism has 60 more reasons to be real. I paraphrased this quote over the weekend, I have posted this at PP before, here it is again:

 

You have been telling people that this is the Eleventh Hour, now you
must go back and tell the people that this is the Hour. And there are
things to be considered.

Where are you living?
What are you doing?
What are your relationships?
Are you in right relation?
Where is your water?

Know your garden.
It is time to speak your truth.
Create your community.
Be good to each other.
And do not look outside yourself for your leader.

Then he clasped his hands together, smiled, and said, "This could be a
good time! There is a river flowing now very fast. It is so great and
swift that there are those who will be afraid. They will try to hold on
to the shore. They will feel they are being torn apart and will suffer
greatly. Know the river has its destination. The elders say we must let
go of the shore, push off into the middle of the river, keep our eyes
open, and our heads above the water.

And I say, see who is in there with you and celebrate. At this time in
history, we are to take nothing personally, least of all ourselves. For
the moment that we do, our spiritual growth and journey come to a halt.

The time of the one wolf is over. Gather yourselves!
Banish the word 'struggle' from your attitude and your vocabulary. All
that we do now must be done in a sacred manner and in celebration.

We are the ones we've been waiting for.

What a wonderful community

Thanks so much,

Three Beers

DLClark91's picture
DLClark91
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Banish the word 'Retirement'

The time of the one wolf is over. Gather yourselves!
Banish the word 'struggle' from your attitude and your vocabulary.

 

 

I would like to add that I've abandoned the word "retirement" from my lexicon because that is symbolic of the unsustainable.  Will we tire of community?  Will we ever stop helping others?  Will we tire of life itself?  Tons of emotional freedom arrive in the death of that very Wall Street word. 

DLClark91's picture
DLClark91
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Rapid Response

Chris, 

As I made my way back to Texas on this Monday, I was impressed to read the depth and breadth of information/writing available on the Cyprus situation which only revealed itself on Friday evening amidst our group activity.  You (& Adam) were quite prolific in putting out clear, insightful discourse/resources/articles on the topic.   

 It is impressive that you published great depth within 72 hours of the incident.  The MSM legions of staff drone on -- impressively you provided great analysis in short order while wrapping up a conference ~ and you checked on your garden???  Well done, sir!

Appreciate your passion. 

Dan Clark

San Antonio, Texas

Ken in MA's picture
Ken in MA
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'Retirement' Moniker

Hola!  I've been having trouble understanding what the word 'retirement' means anyway!  I've used it just because it's our most common way to describe someone of a certain age like myself who has left their 'day job' and not working 'paycheck-style'.  I'm definately up for some expansion and updating of the lexicon here -- and the freedom that goes with it.  How *do* I describe this stage of my life?  "In transition" is the closest I've come to what feels right so far.

California Hills's picture
California Hills
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Just bit the bullet

Gary and I returned to California with our heads spinning with ideas and a big to-do list.  The first thing on the list was to attend the City of Lake Forest's final Emergency Preparedness class this Wednesday with the following note attached to the checklist P/P provided us. For 15 years we have been privately testing the waters in our community - one person at a time.  Here goes being a bit more public.  God help us!

PREPAREDNESS SMALL GROUP—

“My husband and I are looking for some like-minded couples who would like to form a ‘small group’ made of Lake Forest residents interested in thinking outside of the box and taking ‘preparedness’ to the next level.  We just returned from a Preparedness Summit in Massachusetts last weekend where they provided this ‘Self-Assessment Checklist’.  If after reviewing it, you think you would like to meet from time to time—perhaps over a potluck—in various homes to discuss Preparedness in a Changing World and related topics such as economics, resources, creating community, and such, please email me your contact information and a little about your preparedness journey.  I will contact you soon with more information and food for thought.”

 

Jenean Hill

[email protected] — 949-583-1331

 

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
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Ken in MA? Not "retirement"...Elders

While the book was a bestseller in its day, Passages by Gail Sheey is a bit dated. Still, it's worth reading for her take on the stages of life. I'm in what she called the Refreshed (or Resigned) 50s. I will be 60 in a little over a year. Wow, where did the time go? But I am moving into a stage of my life where I am regarded as a wise elder, and younger people come to me for counsel and help. It';s even better with family at home; right now I am mentoring my step-daughter. Before that my mother was our elder in a home that contained my sister and I and our children.The privilege of living in a multi-gerational home over many years drives several points home to me, and might offer a clue as to what to call this life-stage I have coming up.

Older folks in the past were valued for their wisdom. And I don't mean that in a "climb the mountain and visit the guru" sense. They lived with their adult children, grand children, and great grandchildren. Wisdom was imparted by example. Whether it's learning the best way to string and snap fresh green beans to the best way to soothe a colicky infant, or passed-on recipies done elbow-to-elbow in the kitchen, women passed things on. Older men taught younger ones, by example, everything from rope-making and knots to animal husbandry and how to split a cord of wood. Both sexes learned conflict resolution, values, how to manage their resources, and  a myriad of other skills, habits and insights that will lead to sucess. Older family members provided, for the next generation or two, an apprenticeship for life skills.

Please do not call me "sexist" for merely pointing out the postitves of such a mutligenerational system. After all, I'm a female engineer and worked in all-male construction envoronments. If a woman has talents in a traditionally male livelihood, I say go for it, Same for the men: I have friends who are househusbands and full-time caregivers while full-time writers: they were not emasculinated by it. But the ones who make even that life-choice seem to do better in a mutligenerational environment.

Who decided that not living with Mom and Dad was best? Yes, it's nice to not have to live with the folks, but only when you can afford to move out without going into debt! For that matter, as long as the elderly relative is not in a life-threatening condition, who decided that we should put grandma, grandpa, auntie or old uncle in a "home" rather than care for them via family? This sort of behavior is a recent abberation in humanity's history.

So, rather that moving into a self-centered retirement, where you can sit and watch TV all day or play golf or whatever, older people can move into a very useful stage indeed. We can become elders. It's a wonderful, useful, appreciated future. And it will keep us engaged and longer lived than a mere "retirement" spent in self-indugence.

MustardSeed's picture
MustardSeed
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How I am landing after the weekend - action steps

Short version -

1) Sitting at my dining room table with a few copies of the preparedness list to send to family members …  I couldn't make myself put them in envelopes because I felt like it might "ruin their day" to receive the list.  In the end, I started calling them to see "who" would be receiving the list.  Turns out all three sisters have had all this in the back of their minds for a long time and done some of their own intuitive preparing.  They were very happy to have me send the list to them.

It's my children, right now, who are the hard ones to talk with.  One is on her honeymoon in New Zealand, the other is a little freaked out by the topic.  (It's tough enough to have graduated from college in 2008 and worked her little tail off to get the job she loves right now.)

2) I shared the idea of a 10% tax rebate for buying locally with my Chamber of Commerce and local bank.  (See that thread for my post.)

3) Conversation with my husband coming up this weekend.

 

 

eglzorta's picture
eglzorta
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Thanks to all of you

Hi everyone.

A few words to thank you all for your patience and good intentions for Eduardo.  I can say that he learned a lot more from all of you than you could from him.  It´s going to be really difficult for him to forget this incredible experience.

Best Regards,

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
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Posts: 3159
preparedness list

Is that list posted somewhere on PP?  I'd like a copy if it is available.

Thanx, and sorry I couldn't be there.

Doug

 

Becca Martenson's picture
Becca Martenson
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Posts: 43
How to talk to your children and teens

 

I am so grateful that the Eduardo father/son team was with us this past weekend, as they lived and embodied the answer to a question that is frequently posited: how do we talk about such hard subjects with children and teenagers?

 

Throughout the weekend I watched these 2 closely, looking for any signs of distress from young Eduardo.  What I saw was a loving, supportive father-son relationship in which BOTH were willing to be present with what can be very challenging information.  Eduardo senior did not try to protect his son from the information, but rather held his hand and stepped toward/into the difficult truths with him.

 

I found it ironic that young Eduardo and his father sat right up front for the "scariest" section of the seminar when we discussed our fears and hopes.  Again, I was watching closely for any indication that this was “too hard” for our 12 year old participant. What I saw was a young man who was able to be present with the fear of the adults in a grounded, centered way.

 

Remember, children and teens have not spent multiple decades imagining that the future will be any particular way.  They are far more flexible and realistic in their thinking than many of us adults.  They have grown up in the unweaving of the fabric which has been underway for many years; naming the unweaving and pointing out where it is expressing is not some huge revelation, but rather bringing to the surface something they already know on a deeper level.  This is true for adults as well, it is just that most adults are significantly more attached to their ideas about the future than are children. Hence they experience more pain and fear at the thought of losing the future that was previously imagined.

 

Eduardo modeled for us what authentic acceptance looks like in a 12 year old, and illustrated my belief that children and teens are capable of far greater depth and ability to be present with truth than our culture gives them credit for.

 

When talking about this material with your children, it may help to take the “eagle eye” perspective on the level of metaphor.  Like the “Old Woman in the Cave” story, we can witness and name both the unweaving and the re-weaving, which are occurring simultaneously in the moment.  Looking at the big picture of change helps us hold it without fear and thus will be less likely to  transmit fear to the children when we talk about it.

 

With our 3 children (now teens) we approach the subject in the same uncharged, matter-of-fact way that we talk about the harvest of this season’s meat birds.  It is all simply the life and death cycle that we are all a part of, whether it is the life of a chicken, of a human, of a culture or of a country.

 

Young Eduardo has a magical combination of bright innocence, interested curiosity and the wisdom of an elder, and am so grateful that he and his father were with us for the weekend.  As a group, may we continue to harvest the lessons they offered by their presence.

 

 

 

 

treebeard's picture
treebeard
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Out of the mouth of babes and children

Eduardo's contribution was amazing, his presence was a blessing to us all.

I love the sentiment about retirement, I have often thought the same thing, to be surrounded by children like Eduardo and be of use to others through my old age would be as fulflilling a life as I could hope for.

Michael_Armstrong's picture
Michael_Armstrong
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Posts: 8
Great Weekend!

Hello Everyone!

I had a great weekend and enjoyed meeting so many awesome people! Chris, Becca, Adam and Amanda thank you for sharing and making this happen!

Now the fun part begins. Putting what I learned into action.

I look forward to continuing the conversation too!

Michael

 

 

Ken in MA's picture
Ken in MA
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Posts: 4
Elder-ship

Being an 'elder' vs. being 'retired'.  Thanks.  Yes that feels like it's moving in the right direction!  I get the sense of wisdom and experience nuanced by that word.  Then, also, the connotation of 'elderly' which for me brings up thoughts of infirmity and decreased vitality.  My 'eldership' will look so different - a synthesis of diverse diciplines - active, engaged, alive, dynamic, flexible, and in community!

A quick thought sparked by treebeard's post - 
I felt young Eduardo was eldering me.  That boy is an old soul.  So eldership may be as much or more about meeting this new, untested wisdom coming into the world, creating continuity, and less about 'teaching' or 'mentoring'.  Food for thought.

 

Michael_Armstrong's picture
Michael_Armstrong
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Posts: 8
Creating Change and Irrational Behavior

During Sunday morning's session on Creating Change, Chris discussed lessons learned from Behavioral Economics and mentioned a related book titled Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely.

If you are interested in learning more about this topic Dan Ariely is teaching a free course titled Beginner's Guide to Irrational Behavior. It begins Monday, March 25th. You can find more details at https://www.coursera.org/course/behavioralecon

 

 

greenheart's picture
greenheart
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Funny Story

I was at the end of a walk in my local woods Middlesex Fells in case anyone is familiar with the area, when I passed a small group of young people who were having a picnic around a campire they had made off to the side of the trail. As wet as everything is this time of year, the fire was pretty smoky, and, being a grumpy old man, I was tempted to let out a grumpy remark as I passed by, such as thanking them sarcastically for the smoke I had to breathe.  Being an enlightened old man, however, I stifled that impulse, and my thoughts became occupied with considerations of how I felt about campfires and what an appropriate response might be. Then I remembered the last slide of the presentation at the Peak Prosperity weekend.

If you’ll recall, the last slide was a picture of a wood fire, which symbolized the gathering of the tribe to cultivate its stories. At the time the image disturbed me. Was burning carbon in this way really an appropriate symbol? I was reminded that I had wanted to say something about it and I decided that when I got home I would write a post about it. As I began to tell the story in my head I realized that I would have to include the part about me walking away from those kids without saying anything, and, embarrassed, I turned back toward their camp.

I didn’t know what I was going to say. As I approached I greeted them in a friendly way, saying something to the effect of “I noticed you had a fire going”. There were five of them, two guys and three girls and I had heard them speaking Russian when I got near. One of the guys was tending the fire, a puny little thing that was struggling to keep its flame. He got a little defensive, assuring me that they were quite skilled at making fires, they had made it in a place where there had been a fire before and they were well prepared to keep things safe. I assured them that that was not my concern and I was sure they were being safe. I did mention, though not in so many words, that I had had pause to question the meme of the recreational campfire, what with all the problems with carbon in the atmosphere. I mean it’s nice and friendly and everything, but does it really serve us in this day and age. This observation was met with an oblique rebuttal that referred to ancient customs and the gift of fire. I noticed on their picnic tarp was a plate of well-cooked chunks of meat. I was tempted to ask whether it was grass-fed, but held my tongue in the recognition that bringing up the topic of CAFO’s might be a little overbearing.

One of the girls asked me where my dog was, and I looked around to find that he had hung back and was waiting for me on the trail. With that, I bade them a good day, and we parted, smiles all around.

As I continued down the trail, I reviewed our interaction, wondered what else I could have said, how I could have communicated more effectively. After a little, though, I was content that maybe I had planted a seed.

A little further along, the voice of the grumpy old man returned and I heard his words in my head, “C’mon. Huddled around the campfire to ward off the perils of the night? What are we, fuckin’ Neanderthals?”

 

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