r-Selection: Fastest Plants From Seed To Harvest AND From Seed To Seed

Poet
By Poet on Mon, Mar 4, 2013 - 7:17pm

In nature, one way to adapt to change is to reach maturity and reproduce, and reproduce quickly. Rodents and small creatures are a good example of this.

If we want to have resilience, we need to consider plants that have similar strategies.

I am looking ideally for two-in-one, but either will have to do:

1. Fastest time in days from seed to edible harvest.

2. Fastest time in days from seed to seed.

Gimme your thoughts. Thank you!

Poet

4 Comments

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
Off the top of my head, the

Off the top of my head, the fastest things are sprouts. Wicked fast!

  • Alfalfa seeds
  • Clover seeds
  • Broccoli seeds
  • Whole lentils
  • Fenugreek seeds
  • Radish seeds
  • Raw hulled sunflower seeds
  • Chia seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Wheat berries
  • Rye berries
Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
since no one else answered

The fastest growing things in an outside garden, in my experience, are radishes, green (pencil) onions, basil, mint (up north at least) and leaf lettuces (black-seeded Simpson, especially). But in my opinion, it is far, far better to get things that are either everbearing--with a long fruiting or harvest season--and/or incredibly prolific. In that category I would put cut-and-cut-again greens: Jehicho cos lettuce, Swich chard,  oak leaf lettuce, and (in the Fall) kale. Kentucky Wonder pole beans are very prolific and fruitful.

But all of those are just green vegetables: important, but not all that nutritious. The cheapest nutrition is beans (protien) and seeds (fats) . Fordhook Lima beans work in most climates, but limas come in pole bean varieties and that type will save space. We've had good results with blackeyed peas, another nutritious choice, but a Southen one. And the fastest, cheapest seeds are "confectioner" sunflower seeds/- the big ones.

I've not had luck with squashes and pumpkins but if you can master them, very filling and fast growing and prolific! And, of course get an indererminate tomato - a varirty that bears fruit all season.

Steady Footsteps's picture
Steady Footsteps
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: May 29 2011
Posts: 22
Speedy Seeds

Of course, I agree with Wendy that sprouts are the speediest things you can grow.  Here's a link to an article I posted on this site a week ago entitled, "How to Grow Bean Sprouts the Vietnamese Way."  That article talked about growing long, white mung beans in sand.  Vivid green baby radishes are another typically Vietnamese salad addition you can grow in five days or so.

Start out with Daikon radish seeds soaked overnight.  I then spread them out on either damp sand or soil, cover them with a thin layer of sand or soil, and then put some sort of lid over the whole affair to keep them damp until I see the tiny plants start to emerge.  At that point, I remove the lid and allow them to be exposed to sunlight (even a windowsill will do) and, once the seed leaves are fully developed, I pull them up, snip off their dirty little roots, rinse, and serve.  As you can see in the above image, you can grow them in an vacant patch of garden soil or even in a little take-out box.  Left to fully mature, Daikon radishes are quite formidable, as you can see here:

Steady Footsteps's picture
Steady Footsteps
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: May 29 2011
Posts: 22
Oops! So sorry, I messed up the bean sprout link!

Here's the link to the Bean Sprout article:

How to Grow Bean Sprouts the Vietnamese Way

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments