planting schedules

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Mon, Dec 31, 2012 - 6:09pm

One thing every gardener needs is a planting schedule, and in the Northern Hemisphere, winter is the time to work on one. And what's cool about such a schedule is you only have to do it once. Then you copy it to next year's calendar, like I just copied mine 

I finalized my regular planting schedual last year. Oh, I will still tweak it or add new items, but I think I've got the basic plan worked out after three years gardening in this new-to-me climate (USDA Zone 8.5 instead of Zone 5 - a huge difference!)

The easiest way to make a planting schedule is to check with your cooperatve extension service (USA) or agrigultural extension service (rest of the world.) They will have a list of planting times for various crops; I used the local planting schedule tables in my local cooperatve extension service's Clemson Master Gardener Handbook. You can also read the backs of seed packets, but they say unhelpful things like "plant two weeks after the last frost." How will you know each year if that is the last frost? Seriously. There's some guesswork involved. I mitigate that by using the extremely accuate Farmer's Almanac to guestimate the "last frost" for my area. The Farmer's Almanac bases weather predictions on sunspot patterns.

So my calendar now shows the planting window for various things. At one end I have three weeks to put in the onions and garlic next October, and a couple of week's leeway on when I put in the parsnips in November. Early peas can go in starting around February 15 with a two-week window to allow for a colder winter. Those are first this year. So on Feb. 14, I'll just bring up the 10-day lookahead forecast and see when that last frost will be.

6 Comments

Adam Taggart's picture
Adam Taggart
Status: Peak Prosperity Co-founder (Offline)
Joined: May 26 2009
Posts: 2935
Wall calendar or other resource?

Wendy -

Do you simply record your planting schedule on a wall calendar, or do you use a specialized template?

If the latter, and if digital (or digitizable), would you be comfortable sharing the template here?

 

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1982
up on the wall, actually

I use a rather large wall calendar from Flylady.net, which has lined spaces a little larger than a business card. I originally got this calendar so that those in the family that work irregualr hours could put their scheules up there.  It fits in the space I have. If you have more space? You can get a desk blotter calendar at any office supply store and do the same sort of thing.

 

 

Organic Raw Veggies's picture
Organic Raw Veggies
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 24 2012
Posts: 49
Sustainable garden plan

Here is a DVD that contains a companion cd with spreadsheets etc. Planting/harvest times/seeds/plants. DVD develop a sustainable garden plan by Cindy Conner. Homeplaceearth. Includes bed rotations and growing two or more things per season/yr in a bed. For example your garlic you put in, in the fall, you will pull out in June and then you can plant something else in June. Blessings.

featherjack's picture
featherjack
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 7 2010
Posts: 51
Here is...?

Is there a link or attachment you meant to include?

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1982
featherjack, it depends

Your planting schedule will be determined by many things: what items you want to grow, rainfall, last frost/first frost dates. Only you can decide what you want to grow. And since climates vary, I had not intended to include a link or attachment, but referenced your local cooperative extension service. Here is a link to cooperative extension services (USA) or the FAO (International) which includes TECA , a platform where you can find practical information – agricultural technologies and practices. In addition, you can interact with people with similar interests and discuss sustainable solutions for your work in their online forums – or Exchange Groups. Why reinvent the wheel?

featherjack's picture
featherjack
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 7 2010
Posts: 51
DVD or link

I was actually asking organic vegan. I know growing seasons are dependent on a host of factors... Thank you anyway.

I see now... Cindy Conner's Homeplaceearth.com. Indeed, nice resources! Thank you, Ovr!

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