Pesticides Severely Affecting Bees

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Tue, Oct 23, 2012 - 11:01pm

In a new study in Nature, researchers at Royal Holloway, University of London, in Egham, UK, show that low-level exposure to a combination of two pesticides is more harmful to bumblebee colonies than either pesticide alone. This suggests that current methods for regulating pesticides are inadequate because they only consider lethal doses of single pesticides. Low doses of pesticides have subtle yet significant effects on individual bees, and can thus seriously impact colonies


 

Bees are the world’s most important pollinator, and without them the planet would quickly go hungry.

Imidacloprid is widely used for pest control in agriculture. Other uses include application to foundations to prevent termite damage, pest control for gardens and turf, treatment of domestic pets to control fleas, and protection of trees from boring insects. Recent research suggests that widespread agricultural use of imidacloprid and other pesticides may be contributing to honey bee colony collapse disorder, the decline of honey bee colonies in Europe and North America observed since 2006. As a result, several countries have restricted use of imidacloprid and other neonicotinoids.

Imidacloprid has many brands and formulations for a wide range of uses from delousing or defleaing animals to saving Hemlocks, Maple, Oak and Ash Trees. Here are a few—Admire, Advantage (Advocate) (flea killer for pets), Gaucho, Mallet, Merit, Nuprid, Prothor, Turfthor, Confidor, Conguard, Hachikusan, Kohinor, Optrol, Premise, Prothor, Provado, Intercept, Winner, and Xytect.

 

2 Comments

livewire120v's picture
livewire120v
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2010
Posts: 4
Insect repellent for the chemical consious

Isn't it funny that what we grow can be a friendly insect repellent (not killer).

Here is my recipe:

1 finely diced bulb hot onion

1 finely chopped bulb of garlic

2 finely chopped of your hottest peppers

1/4 cup of oil (I use organic vegetable)

put it all in a 5 gallon bucket and fill with water (rain or well is best). Cover and let sit for 3 months. Since this takes a while do it now. Filter out as much as you need and fill the bucket back up with water. Misting the plants(s) is better to get under the foilage but a water can will work too.

 

livewire120v's picture
livewire120v
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2010
Posts: 4
My non-chemical fungicide

Fungicide for the chemically consious

This is not a preventive action but after you have caught fungi on your plants. This changes the Ph level on your leaves which is not a big deal but since it does change something I do not do this unless the plant(s) are infected. You have to catch it early for any treatment to work. Here is my recipe:

1/4 cup of oil (I use organic vegetable)

3 Tablespoons of baking soda

Put it all in a 5 gallon bucket and fill with water. Mix. Mist or water plant(s) including underside of leaves. Repeat in about 3 days.

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