WSID? Step 4 - Growing & Preserving Food

brighton_roy
By brighton_roy on Tue, Jul 10, 2012 - 11:14am

This discussion builds on the ideas in Step 4 of the WSID series

 

4 Comments

joanne123's picture
joanne123
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 9 2012
Posts: 10
food supplies

I would certainly recommend that everyone who possibly can  grows as much of their own food as they can.  Having said that most people won't have the land to grow everything they need, so perhaps this is where community links come in.  How many elderly people live near you who can no longer tend their own gardens?  If you have the time could you grow food on their land and share it with them? 

I would think that for most people food storage would be the way to go and this is really well covered on this website.

brighton_roy's picture
brighton_roy
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 26 2011
Posts: 26
landshare websites

You could try http://www.landshare.net/ which helps match up people with land with people who want somewhere to grow their food.  

In Brighton, there is a similar local group at http://www.growyourneighboursown.org.uk/ so I expect there are others around the country too.

 

 

brighton_roy's picture
brighton_roy
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 26 2011
Posts: 26
Self-watering Containers

Anyone familiar with these?  I've been using them for 3 or 4 years with tomatoes, salads, carrots etc...

They are ideal for container gardening, and for people like me who are always looking for short cuts to make life a bit easier.  Essentially,  the SWC is a reservoir which sits beneath the soil in your container.  You fill the reservoir via a tube that comes up above soil level.

There are two main advantages:

1) No more over/under-watering.  Plants effectively feed themselves - with the roots drawing the water up from the reservoir through the soil.  So as long as you keep the reservoir topped-up, your plants will take as much water as they need, and this can lead to more productive and better quality crops.

2) Time-saving.  Anyone who has grown tomatoes will know they get very thirsty and - depending on the size of the plant - often need watering every day once they are fully established.  I use a 10-litre SWC for my container-grown tomatoes, so rather than needing to be out there feeding them once or twice a day, I only need to feed them once every 3 or 4 days.  It makes life a lot easier, especially when you're going to be away for a few days as most of us do in the summer.

I've had great results from my SWC's.  Strangely though, I've not seen them in any garden centres (although I have seen some cheap-looking built-in ones, which work on the same principle).  Here's a link to where I've bought mine - there's a bit more explanation about how they work too.

http://www.interiorlandscaping.co.uk/swk.htm

Also, if you are so-inclined, there are plenty of 'make your own' guides on t'internet...

 

joanne123's picture
joanne123
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 9 2012
Posts: 10
I used a similar system of

I used a similar system of self watering seed trays this year and they worked a treat.  I got mine from Thompson and Morgan although you might be able to get them cheaper on the internet.  At T & M I think they were about £15 each which I thought was expensive but I had some vouchers to use so they worked out at a reasonable price for me.

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