Inventory your stored food

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Fri, Mar 2, 2018 - 4:10pm

One of the chores you can do in the winter season is to inventory your stored food. Whether  it's dehydrated, canned or frozen, it all has an expiration date. 

I always start my inventory with frozen things, since they have the shortest shelf life. I don't have a lot of this sort of storage, since I like to keep the amount of frozen things below what I can can immediately if there is an extended power outage - for whatever reason. You've been labeling everything so you know how old it is, right?

Individual portions of chopped bell peppers from 2017's garden, and ground beef, labeled for the freezer.

Clean out the entire freezer and change the box of baking soda that pulls odors from the freezer. Set the items you need to use up right away into the refrigerator, and plan your next few meals around them. IMPORTANT. When in doubt about freezer burn, cook the ingredients separately and see how it tastes before adding it to any other ingredients. That way, if it tastes "off " you only throw away that one item.

Next are the home-canned goods. I keep mine in the dining room, under a side table. It's cooler near the floor and that means they keep longer in my hot climate than in the pantry. 

The clipboard at the start of this post is several pages long, and when I use something up, I note it on the clipboard. When I do my inventory, I put anything that needs to be used up soon on the kitchen counter and use those until they're gone. NOTE: If you still have a lot of something, then don't plant as much the next year. If you ran out, plant and can more of it. IMPORTANT: bulged and leaking home-canned goods can kill you. Throw them out! A certain percentage of spoilage is normal. 

Next is the dried or dehydrated food. There are a lot of dried things in mason jars in the same area as the home canned food: dried figs, dried apples, sun-dried tomatoes, fruit leathers, dried blueberries, spices, and roasted nuts. They all go on the inventory sheets. I find it useful to put a silica gel desiccant in each dried fruit jar. I also jar the nuts hot, in hot dry jars, and they form a natural seal that makes them last longer. (You may have other dried things like grains, elsewhere. You ARE using those up, right? They will not last forever.) These also go into your inventory. 

Finally, there is the pantry. If might you have a problem with insects for goods, like flour and sugar, those items need to go in metal or thick plastic containers. Plastic bags will not provide as much protection. If you FIND insect problems, throw all of the affected foods out, wash inside the cabinet, and I like to spray with a bug killer that will not harm humans (neem oil). 

Learn to read the labels on cans to see how old they are. Put the oldest items up front and the newer ones toward the back. Just like the home-canned goods, anything that need used up right away should be set out on the kitchen counter until used up. Everythgn else goes on your inventory sheets. IMPORTANT: bulged and leaking canned goods can also kill you. Toss 'em. 

Based on your inventory you now can see the holes in your preps...and grow, shop, and preserve accordinglly. 

You should have enough for six months food between all of your sources. If not, then add to them as needed.

26 Comments

pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2008
Posts: 2241
Nice job Wendy!

I have found that I haven't been using up my frozen black currants as fast as I used to -when I  was making smoothies with them every day- and now I have several bags that are a couple of years old.  It's a shame  to lose them like this, after all the work growing, harvest and cleaning them.  So that was my recent reminder of the importance of keeping track of one's inventory, and making sure to use it in a timely fashion.

westcoastjan's picture
westcoastjan
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 4 2012
Posts: 566
Some old stuff has other uses...

I have had fun this winter making bird food for my feeders with stale dated or too old for my liking dried goods. The cornmeal is a big hit as is the mix I made with my food processor of old oatmeal, rice, nuts and dried fruit that I failed to consume on time. My feather friends are happy campers and I am happy that nothing went in the garbage!

There is always room for creative thinking when prepping wink

Jan

frekkells's picture
frekkells
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 4 2016
Posts: 2
Canning question

This is a great reminder for me.  I do need to clean up the freezer.  One quick question about canning storage.  I am new to canning, been trying different things for a couple years now.  Most of my knowledge has come from reading, especially online.  I was under the impression you shouldn't store canned goods on top of each other cause the weight may hold down a lid that may have popped because of spoilage thereby hiding the spoilage.  Could you address this for me please? 

richcabot's picture
richcabot
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 5 2011
Posts: 170
Compost

Empty the bulging containers into your compost.  Stir it up and let it cook.

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 77
Thanks, Wendy! When I get any

Thanks, Wendy! When I get any new stuff, I write the expiration date on a piece of masking tape and put it on the front of the package for easy reading/sorting.

One thing I've been wondering...I wanted to get some bulk canned stuff, like the 10# cans that the LDS centers sell (though apparently most of them have stopped selling "wet" goods like tomatoes), but we're a household of 2. In the event of an extended power outage, refrigeration might be a problem, so it seems like we'd be better off getting smaller-serving cans so we can finish one in one meal. Any thoughts?

Yoxa's picture
Yoxa
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 21 2011
Posts: 278
Small cans more versatile
Quote:

 so it seems like we'd be better off getting smaller-serving cans so we can finish one in one meal.

Yes, absolutely.

A jumbo economy size can of [whatever] can be good value but you need a safe way to store the part you don't eat right away.

Smaller cans would be more versatile in a power-out situation, so have a mix of sizes in your preps.

 

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
LDS #10 cans

While the #10 cans do hold a lot of food, it does not need to be refrigerated after opening, and it does not need to be used all at once, it is shelf stable. I have opened and used many of these to try out. Be forewarned, a #10 can of diced onion or carrots is an awful lot. Generally, in a short power outage, I would not open those 2 options, and you would likely have carrots and onions that are not dehydrated, or do without for 2 days. When you get an LDS #10 can, get the optional plastic lid. This will keep the enclosed food fresh for many months while you use it. If you cannot use it all within 3 to 6 months, repackage some into glass canning jars, I have a food saver for vacume sealing, and an attachment that evacuates the air out of canning jars. This is not good enough for 30 years, but would keep those diced carrots good for a year, easy. But, in an extended SHTF outage, or even a shorter outage where I would share those dried onions to help make my neighbors food more palatable, just the cans and lids keep everything very well

nedyne's picture
nedyne
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 14 2012
Posts: 54
Easy vegan storage

My diet is of the healthy plant-based variety so that makes it pretty easy to store up a lot of food that I'm guaranteed to use up before it goes bad. I mostly store dried lentils and brown rice in their packaging. Beans are more likely to get infestations so I don't load up much on those.

Dried lentils apparently last indefinitely as far as I could glean.

The brown rice I get comes vacuum-sealed so it lasts a good year or slightly more. 

I've found it easier to keep the inventory of the things I care about on the note app in my phone and update it every time I buy stuff and every time I open a package. I don't like to have to re-inventory periodically.

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 77
Ok, I think the different

Ok, I think the different answers arose from 10# cans of *dehydrated* food (which, as I mentioned earlier, seems to be the only cans you can get from the LDS places that aren't in Utah) vs large cans of non-dehydrated food, like tomatoes, green beans, etc. It makes sense that you wouldn't have to refrigerate the dehydrated stuff, but I don't see how you'd get away with not refrigerating opened cans of wet stuff.

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
they only sell

The only cans LDS sells is dehydrated stuff. It is canned in sealed #10 cans, and is dried food. It is a good value for the money and is good food, I opened a few to try out cooking with it, it keeps well too. You take about 2T of dried carrots, put in a bowl, cover with water, and let rehydrate, and it has the taste and texture of fresh carrots !  It is not like mushy canned carrots at all.

Basically, you have between 1-3 months of "regular food" , so that would be the proper sized cans and amounts for the size family you have, and yes, you get the right size so that once you open it, you use it all at once.

The food LDS sells is for Long Term Food Storage, so items you leave for many years without rotating or using and that keep once opened without refrigeration. This is for when you are wanting to keep more than 3 months worth of food, there are many families that store a years worth of long term foods. Even if you are just keeping 1 to 3 months worth of food, getting at least 1 can each of the LDS dried carrots and dried onions is a good idea, as it can help make soups and such out of the other food you have, and both of these work like fresh food once you add water. For canned tomatoes, just buy at the store, or can yourself from the garden, and rotate stock, this should be in the right size for using at once when opened.

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
frekkells, You'll notice in

frekkells,

You'll notice in my picture that I keep the jars in boxes they were bought in, with the plastic still on them. . I also leave the rings on the  jars, so the lower boxes only have pressure on the rings, not the lids. 

Trust me, if you don't hear the pop of a good seal when you open a jar of home-canned food, you'll know to discard it. 

Wendy

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
2 person sizes

darcieg76,

I am also in a two-person household. It annoys me that a flat of quart jars are the same price as pint jars are the same price as half-pint jars! Because there are only two of us, we can only use quart jars for pie fillings (they're exactly the right volume for that) or dried things. Even a pint jar is often too large. They're good for pickling. but not for jams and jellies: those get fuzzy before we finish them! 

As far as store-bought canned goods, I buy the smallest size of things like mushroom pieces or tomato sauce, but much prefer my dried mushrooms and home-canned sauce. We can refrigerate a half-used pint sized jar of pressure canned corn, for example. or fold the leftovers into a jar of salsa or dump them in soup. There is no way we can do that with a quart jar of almost anything. 

 

jtwalsh's picture
jtwalsh
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 267
LDS #10

I have been buying #10 cans from the LDS for about six years.  I have used them to stock up my "end of the world provisions" but we have also started using them for our present day cooking needs. We have five adults and two children in the house at present so supplies go fairly quickly.  Even so, the flour, oatmeal, sugar and beans have an open can shelf life of several months if kept properly sealed.  We have made space on a kitchen shelf where six of the big cans sit each holding a different product.  The quality is top notch and it is pleasant to know that there is always another can in the larder. The price is a little higher than we would pay at the market in our area but the quality and shelf life of the sealed cans make up for the difference in my mind.

Pasta is a large ingredient in our menus.  For several years I just bought boxed pasta on sale and stored it in our pantry, in the unopened boxes. The pantry is in a dry, temperature moderate place in the cellar. One day I discovered that a box had been infested with some type of meal worn.  As it turned out, over forty boxes (forty pounds) had been infested and had to be destroyed.  From the pattern of the infestation it seemed that the culprits came in some boxes of no-name pasta I had picked up on deep discount.

Since that time I wait for the good quality stuff to go on sale and then buy ten or twelve boxes at a time.  I open each box, put the pasta in a one gallon, zip lock freezer bag and then stuff the bagged pasta back in the box which I reseal with painter's tape. (I assume you could do without the boxes but I like to keep the labels so I know what type and brand of pasta I am grabbing from storage and the boxes protect the bags from punctures or accidental opening.) In six years I have not lost a single box of pasta to dampness or insects.  The freezer bags are pricey but can be reused several times.

For a number of years I have had a system of colored labels (different color for each year to easily identify the oldest to newest) on which I write the purchase date of each canned good and other shelf storable items.  I have to admit that since the new year I have been rather negligent in keeping up that system.  Thanks for the wake up call Wendy.  Time to straighten up the shelves and to get the system back on track.

I have to add that, when feeding a large family, learning bulk and long term storage techniques allows my food purchasing dollars to go much further than they would by buying non-sale, regular sized items.  The money saved on storable items gives me more more flexibility to purchase higher quality meat, produce and vegetables and to provide a healthier diet overall.

JT

grandefille's picture
grandefille
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 11 2010
Posts: 36
It is very easy to check the

It is very easy to check the seal on the lid of a canning jar: press and release in the middle of the lid with your finger.  A bad seal will cause this spot to move up and down, and usually make a clicking noise.  A well sealed lid won't move when pressed.  When canning jars cool after processing, you often hear a "clicking" noise as the lid seals.  That is because the air inside the jar is cooling, creating a slight vacuum which pulls the lid down.  The rubber seal gets rigid as it cools, and forms the seal.  You could put a lid on an empty jar, screw on a ring, and practice feeling the unsealed movement if that helps.

The most likely problem I have seen with stacking jars is not hiding a bad seal, but rather the jostling of a jar against the lower lid can disrupt a not-great seal. 

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
canning lids

I make sure to have the rings off the canning jars when storing, keeping rings on can hide a bad seal, if any seal is iffy and is going o be disrupted by stacked jar, as mentioned, you want to know it ! Take all rings off after canning, wash and check seals, wash the rings. Store the rings seperately.

frekkells's picture
frekkells
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 4 2016
Posts: 2
Canning question continued

Thank you for the great advice.  I haven't canned so much that I need to stack anything, yet.  We are still discovering what we like and use as opposed to what sits in the jar on the shelf.  The cherry jam I made was delicious and is gone, but I canned some fruit with grape juice to avoid using sugar, and the fruit ended up tasting like grapes; not delicious.  I do enjoy canning, knowing exactly what is in the food and the convenience.  

The loud pop when I open the can and the smell and look of the food should be all the indicators I need to know that I am not going to give botulism to or poison my family.  Throw out anything suspicious or off.  It seems like a simple thing when I look at what I just typed, but when you aren't raised and taught canning, it is a worry and seems like maybe it should be harder.  Is there anything else or does that sum it up?

I still need to clean out my freezer!    

 

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
canning answers continued

First, I do stack jars and have never had it cause a problem, just 2 high.

 

As for botulism, things that can be safely water bath canned, meaning sufficiently acidic, cannot grow botulism -- nope, cant happen, so not a worry. This means canned fruit, fruit jams, pickled items with vinegar ( pickles, chow -chow, relishes, Dilly beans, salsa made with something acidic like lime juice or vinegar, ie. a published canning recipe) and tomato products ( plain tomato products without added vegetables). So, all that cannot grow botulism. It cant kill you. Maybe you could get sick if it was bad, it should be obvious that it goes bad. Start with the Ball canning book, and I realy like the new ball canning book for additional recipes. Any recipe these have that calls for water bath canning cannot give you botulism even if the seal fails. One of our new favorites from the new ball canning book is carrot habenaro butter, basically this is used like a salsa, great on tacos. It is a water bath canning recipe done as written because of the added lime juice making it acidic.

As for sugar, the new ball canning book gives recipes for canning fruit with alot less sugar. I use sugar when canning fruit, a light syrup, I think canning in straight water would take the flavor out of the fruit, so you want a light or extra light syrup. I make jams with Pomonas Pectin ( look it up) which will set (gel) no matter how much sugar is used, so I can use realy light sugar in the jams. The thing to remember when doing this is that sugar is a preservative, so if you make jam with low sugar it will not last as long when it is opened. So, you need to can the low sugar jam in smaller jars.

 

After many years water bath canning, I have now pressure canned too. When opening a pressure canned jar, yes, you want to pay attention that it was properly sealed.

 

herewego's picture
herewego
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 11 2010
Posts: 149
Botulism and acidity, and another canning question

Hello frekkells and everybody

I'm fairly new at canning but did an awful lot of it last summer with an overflow of cukes, zukes, apples and peaches.  I wanted to be completely safe, after doing some reading about botulism. It's an awful poison - a nerve toxin that paralyses the body including the respiratory system.  Sorry if this is obvious to most of you, but I want to make it clear for anyone who doesn't know that a good seal does not protect against the botulin toxin.

A beautifully sealed jar can pop just right, look, smell and taste great, and be full of botulin spoors that just love the oxygen-free environment inside every jar of canned food.What kills botulin spoors is temperatures that can only be reached in a pressure canner, and acidity.  If the food being canned is not acidic enough, vinegar or lemon juice must be added before canning to make it safe, no matter how well it sealed.

I have not used a pressure canner, so I am careful to use only waterbath recipes tested by university departments that specialize in testing canning methods for safety, or those from canning jar companies, who also create recipes and test for safety.  Bell, Kerr, and Barnardin all have online waterbath canning recipes. 

Low-acid vegetables and fruits like cukes, zukes, green beans, melons and even some tomatoes can indeed provide growth mediums for the botulin spoor.(Meats are also not acidic enough to kill the spoors and therefore must be pressure canned or pickled - not something I've tackled yet.)

Lids not sealing properly is a separate issue from botulism, with other food poisoning possibilities.  But that's easy to avoid - just don't eat it if the seal is poor, or put it in the fridge to eat ASAP if you find bad seals once they've cooled.

Here is one of my sources:

https://www.bernardin.ca/en/stepbystep.htm

Now my question:  I just can't handle the amount of sugar in so many canning recipes, so I put in less.  That works fine for some things, but my beautiful peaches are completely losing their color after just a few months.  Is there a solution other than putting in lots of sugar to keeping the color?  I use lemon or lime to keep them from browning during prep, but once canned they start to lose both color and flavor....

Cheers

Susan

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
botulism

What I said was that properly waterbath canned recipes, recipes that are indicated to be safely waterbathed canned, cannot grow botulism. This is true. If you can something that shouldnt be waterbath canned, then yes, you could very easily have a problem.....

So, right, low acid vegetables can grow botulism, this is why they are only safe to waterbath can when they are made into pickles or relish. When that acidity is added, they cannot grow botulism. When I waterbath can a low acid vegetable, I use a known safe canning recipe. When you do this, you can can chow-chow ( peppers, cabbage, corn, cauliflower, onion) dilly beans ( green beans done like dill pickles) cucumbers ( pickles, pickle relish) etc..... These things will not grow botulism even if their seal fails when they are canned with an appropriate brine (vinegar or lime juice or citric acid, etc... brine). None of the vegetables I just listed in this paragraph can be water bath canned without the added acid, otherwise you would need to pressure can, or just dehydrate or freeze.

Tomatoes. If you are new to canning and want to be safe, yes, add citric acid crystals as the canning recipe indicates. The new recipes cover all bases, like people canning over ripe tomatoes, or using a new variety bred to be sweet for fresh eating. Overripe tomatoes of some varieties may not be acidic enough on their own, this is relatively new information, tomatoes have been waterbath canned for a very, very long time without citric acid. This is easy to do, just add a bit into the jars when you add your salt, before putting lids on and putting into the waterbath canner. Make sure to add the amount indicated from the canning recipe.

What do I do ? When I am canning tomatoes that I have fresh picked out of my garden that day that are properly ripe, I do not add citric acid, I have citric acid on hand if I thought it was indicated, why I dont use it all the time is that it also makes the tomato dices stay firmer and I want my canned tomatoes to have the consistency of cooked fresh tomatoes and not be so firm. I am not advocating this, just saying. I am not worried about it either. But, I do appreciate that our USDA testing labs are so thorough, that they found out that there could be a problem. So, if I was you, this is more reason to trust Ball canning books tested recipes or recipes from the USDA site. They are taking no chances and cover all bases, including consumers using older or overripe produce, or a newer non-acidic variety that was developed for fresh eating and not for canning. Use the tested recipes and you can safely use any and all tomatoes (obviously, not ones about to go bad, throw those to the chickens).

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
peach browning

Forgot about that one.

Ball canning makes a product called fruit fresh, treating with this will prevent browning. It is a mix of ascorbic acid and citric acid,( the ascorbic acid is the best at preventing browning). You can likely look up ways to use straight ascorbic acid(vitamin C) so if you do alot you could buy it in bulk and not in their little jar.

herewego's picture
herewego
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 11 2010
Posts: 149
Hi Mntnhousepermi

Thanks for the info on ascorbic acid.  I'll try it this year IF my wunderkind peach tree survives our zone 5 winter and we have pollinators at the right time for it to crop.

I wasn't trying to criticize your information about canning.  It sounds like you know just what you are doing.  But since botulism is so nasty, I wanted to be very exact that a good seal does not = no botulin toxin.  I think it's covered now!

Happy planting!

Susan

robshepler's picture
robshepler
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 16 2010
Posts: 108
Default

I use my pressure canner almost exclusively over a water bath. Higher temps and shorter times as we are at altitude and we don't have to mess with jar sterilization. Lower embodied energy too.

We have a big 21 quart and a small 7 quart canner, the little guy gets a lot of use for small jobs, very handy.

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 77
Thanks, everyone, for the

Thanks, everyone, for the input!

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 77
Thanks, everyone, for the

Thanks, everyone, for the input!

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
type of canning

How high up are you ? And, what kinds of foods are you pressure canning that would normally be water bath canned ?

Normally we dont use a pressure canner for regular canning because it takes longer, and it softens the food more than we would like for those types of foods. Although, if you like soft canned tomatoes, I do know a few people who do tomatoes that way ( and then no adding of citric acid) Maybe if you are realy high up the timing is the same to heat up ? But, then the cool down time takes so long for a pressure canner, it takes much longer to do back to back batches. Once you have a water bath canner up to temp, you take out one batch of jam, and immediatelly put in the next, so it is the fastest and uses less energy if you are doing multiple batches. So, is your idea that it takes less energy because you never do back to back batches and only do one batch of jars at once ? Or, you are so high up that you can't get water bath canner hot enough regardless ? I ask this so we can give newbies, who still need to buy equipment, full information and good recomendations.

For new-to-canning people, you also can use a pressure canner as a water bath canner by filling up with water and by not tightening the lid, so not putting under pressure, if you wanted to. Then, you can do back to back batches of water bath canning safe products as you dont need to wait for the canner to cool off and release pressure.

My go to for "water bath" canning type of canning, if I am doing one batch of jam or such, is to use a steam canner, very quick to heat up, not heavy to carry like the other 2. While I have a simple, aluminum steam only one, I bought my daughter this one, which can water bath can or steam can https://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Multi-Use-Temperature-Indicator-VKP1130...

The one I own is this one : https://www.amazon.com/Aluminum-Temperature-Indicator-VICTORIO-VKP1054/dp/B0058SSUV0?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-ffsb-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B0058SSUV0     But, if doing it again I would get the one I bought my daughter, linked above, stainless steel and can be used either way. Because, if you are doing multiple batches, the water bath canner will use less energy and take less time.

As one of the reviewers states, and I looked into this once too, but didnt save the info "....After reading some reviewers stating that steam canning wasn't recommended by the USDA people and other people insisting they work well, I decided to do my own research. I found an article by Utah State University Extension regarding steam canning here: [...]
This showed me that it has been tested, proven safe, but the USDA is not comfortable because they feel it has not been tested enough. How much testing do they want, really? ..."

Why we dont worry about steam canning, we only are canning things that way that cannot grow botulism in it. It is not a pressure canner, never use a steam canner for foods that need to be canned under pressure

I also have a water bath canner and a pressure canner. I like my pressure canner and use it for canning lentil soups, meat, stock. But, it does take longer and more energy to use.

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
Here is a good srticle that

Here is a good srticle that answers teh question on why you would not just want to pressure can everything ( it can make many things inedible (to mushy)), which way of canning uses less energy and time (for most locations, steam or waterbath canning), and gives a list of some things that can be canned either way.

http://www.healthycanning.com/can-i-just-pressure-can-everything-instead...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments