Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 5/6 - Good News Friday: This Is Your Mind On Brains, The Power Of Self-Compassion

Friday, May 6, 2016, 9:54 AM

This is Good News Friday, where we find some good economic, energy, and environmental news and share it with PP readers. Please send any positive news to [email protected] with subject header "Good News Friday." We will save and post weekly. Enjoy!

Economy

This Is Your Mind On Brains (jdargis)

A number of studies have also identified parts of the brain involved in representing concepts, such as the notion of actions or tools. But for the new Nature paper, Alexander Huth, a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Jack Gallant at the University of California–Berkeley, took a much more comprehensive approach, testing thousands of words, embedded in lengthy narratives, to see what kinds of activation patterns turned up.

Because failure is an option SpaceX can do stuff like land rockets on a boat (jdargis)

SpaceX had landed once successfully at sea a month ago. But that landing attempt after flying a Dragon spacecraft to low-Earth orbit had a favorable flight profile for bringing the rocket back to land—not too great a reentry velocity and plenty of fuel to slow the rocket down. Friday morning’s launch, which ultimately delivered a Japanese communications satellite to a transfer orbit some 35,786km above the Earth, led to extreme reentry speeds and temperatures. Although Elon Musk optimistically tweeted the odds were “maybe even” of success, the company’s official prognosis was “unlikely.”

Scientists Almost Certain Advanced Life On Other Planets Has Existed At Some Point (jdargis)

Yet three large uncertainties plague the original Drake equation. "We've known for a long time approximately how many stars exist,” Frank explained in a statement. “We didn't know how many of those stars had planets that could potentially harbor life, how often life might evolve and lead to intelligent beings, and how long any civilizations might last before becoming extinct… Thanks to NASA's Kepler satellite and other searches, we now know that roughly one-fifth of stars have planets in 'habitable zones,' where temperatures could support life as we know it. So one of the three big uncertainties has now been constrained."

Why Self-Compassion Works Better Than Self-Esteem (jdargis)

The other thing is, it's pretty common, at least in American society, that in order to have high self-esteem, you have to feel special and above-average. If someone said, "Oh, your performance was average," you would feel hurt by that, almost insulted.

When we fail, self-esteem deserts us, which is precisely when we need it most.

'Boaty McBoatface' polar ship named after Attenborough (jdargis)

"Boaty" lives on as the name of one of the ship's remotely operated submarines.

But why couldn't the main vessel itself have carried the name? Here's one reason: imagine the ship were to get into trouble at some point in the future.

Markets At Crossroads: Huge Moves Brewing In Stocks And Gold (Taki T.)

While all previous charts were interesting and meaningful, the most fascinating chart currently is GOLD. This is an incredible story. The yellow metal moved from the bottom of its descending trend channel to the top in a matter of weeks. That was an extremely powerful move, and we admit in all honesty that we did not see that coming.

Chevy Bolt EV electric car to be GM-Lyft self-driving car testbed (jdargis)

According to an article yesterday in The Wall Street Journal, Lyft will give customers the option of riding in the prototype autonomous Bolt EV when they request a ride through its app.

The company didn't name the city in which the pilot program would be conducted.

The Paradox Of Radiation (jdargis)

Today, heavy regulation requires many stages of preclinical testing before treating patients, but Grubbe boldly tried X-rays on a cancer patient just two days later. Rose Lee, who had advanced breast cancer, was desperate. She had two prior surgeries to remove her tumor, but the cancer kept coming back. On referral from one of Grubbe’s professors, Lee sat for a total of 18 X-ray treatments at the light bulb factory. Grubbe simply positioned the Crookes tube over the tumor and turned on the electric current for a few minutes, with little understanding of what would be the appropriate dose. The treatments did reduce her pain. Nevertheless, she died a month later.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 5/5/16

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

4 Comments

Tall's picture
Tall
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 18 2010
Posts: 564
A call to farms

http://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/subzero-2016/a-call-to-farms/882/?u...

 

Adam Taggart's picture
Adam Taggart
Status: Peak Prosperity Co-founder (Offline)
Joined: May 26 2009
Posts: 2934
I like that

"Match.com for local farmers". I like that concept, Tall.

I agree that such an exchange deserves to exist.

I will note that there are such organizations operated at the county level in a growing number of places in the US.

I'm on the board of one in Sonoma County, CA, called Sonoma County Farm Trails. It's one of the oldest, and its model is being copied by more counties each year.

Farm Trails began in the early 1970s as a way for consumers to have a direct relationship with their local farmers (this was in the days before the popularity of farmer's markets and the explosion of the recent farm-to-table movement.). Today, it sponsors a number of annual events to draw consumers from within and without the county to visit local producers (one just this past weekend drew 2,500 visitors to Sonoma County farms), as well as information and idea exchange among the farmers themselves.

Check out their website. The interactive map is an especially valuable resource. If your county doesn't have something like this yet, feel free to encourage motivated folks to contact SCFT. They'll be happy to help your county replicate their model.

thc0655's picture
thc0655
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 27 2010
Posts: 1513
FerFAL on lessons learned already re: Alberta forest fire

http://www.themodernsurvivalist.com/archives/4691

Lessons Learned:

1)It can happen to anyone, at any time. NO EXCEPTIONS. PERIOD.

Next time I read about someone claiming he already lives at his Bug Out Location and doesn’t plan on ever bugging out I’ll buy a plane ticket, fly wherever he lives and tattoo on his forehead “YOU CANT LIVE AT YOUR BUG OUT LOCATION”. By definition, a Bug Out Location is a place where you go when your main place of residence is compromised and no longer viable. The moment you are living there, it no longer counts as an alternative place to go to because it has now become the place where you are living. This is just as ridiculous as people that believe they don’t need to worry because they already left the city which will succumb to zombies in the coming apocalypse. Fire doesn’t care that you live in the forest or in nice suburbs or the middle of the city. As long as it finds fuel it will burn it down, rural or not. Forest fires spread with terrible speed, same happens in dry grasslands and bushes. Floods don’t care either. No matter where you live and how good your home setup is, there’s always the chance of one disaster or another forcing you to bug out so you need to plan for it.

2)You may have days, hours, or seconds

Sometimes you have days or several hours to plan and carry out your evacuation. Sometimes it’s a matter of minutes, seconds and sometimes you don’t make it out at all. You need to have a plan for this spectrum of possibilities. What do you do if all you manage to do is escape the burning house with nothing but the clothes on your back, which may as well be your underwear in the middle of winter. What do you grab if you have a minute or two? What do you throw in the trunk of your car if you have a bit more time?

3)You may be able to go back home in a matter of hours, days or never.

You may be evacuating due to an approaching storm and after it clears you may be back home the following day… or the storm turns into a massive flood and completely destroys your entire neighbourhood killing anyone that stayed and leaving your with nothing at all to go back to. The same can be said of a fire, which leaves you with nothing but a patch of charred dirt and ashes.

4)Have your kit organized and ready to go.

Don’t have a 120L rucksack ready to invade Iraq as your only Bug Out Bag. Organize your gear in layers. Have a bigger BOB but also have a smaller one in case you cant carry your huge backpack plus five tons of food and ammo. Its important to keep a small bag, fanny pack or satchel (VIP Bag) with your important documents, cash, maybe a handgun. The idea is to keep it in your safe and if nothing else, you take this smaller bag. Recently a grandmother drowned in Texas along with her four grandkids during a flash flood. She couldn’t even make it out of the house garage. I doubt she would have been able to carry 100 lbs of gear. Maybe you have to help others evacuate, maybe there’s wounded or hysterical people, maybe you are hurt yourself. If you have just seconds to escape you may or may not be able to carry a small bag. What this gives you is options to work with, but you need to plan and organize this ahead of time.

5)Have your vehicle ready to go at all times.

Your car must work. It may be a matter of life or death. You better have enough gas to make it out of there as well. This too can be a matter of life or death even with a perfectly functional vehicle. The lesson here is, refill your tank when its 1/3 or ¼ capacity, but also keep fuel ready at hand. Not in your uncles farm or your cabin in the woods, but ready to go in your current place of residence. Keep your car’s kit in order. It may be all you have left if your home is destroyed. Extra clothes, some food, water, first aid kit, USB and copies of important papers. Don’t forget a phone charger and maybe keep a spare dedicated phone in your vehicle.

FerFAL

Go to the site to see the 2:43 video and read/watch a first person account.

Uncletommy's picture
Uncletommy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: May 3 2014
Posts: 474
It can happen anywhere!

Fires in Australia, floods in Britain, remember Katrina, Earthquakes, Tsunamis; how about this for technology bringing it home:

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