Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 12/14 - December Warmth Breaks Hundreds Of Records, Emerging Markets To Feel Pain Of U.S. Rate Rise

Monday, December 14, 2015, 10:42 AM

Economy

BFP Exclusive- What the New York Times Did Not Tell You About NATO & Montenegro (richcabot)

The old Orientalist cliché, so well described by the Palestinian-American critical theorist Edward Said, is being repeated here. While the West is presented as cool and rational (making its plans into reality), the East is emotional and unpredictable (reacting with threats and fury). According to Erlanger's elitist account, here once again we have the case of the "mature" and powerful West scoring against the "immature" and powerless East.

Emerging markets set to feel pain of US rate rise (Uncletommy, sign-in required)

China’s heft as the world’s largest trading nation endows the renminbi with considerable influence. The renminbi’s 4 per cent decline against the US dollar since its August devaluation has fed a downtrend in EM currencies, with commodity exporters and Asian countries that supply Chinese manufacturers among the worst hit.

13-minute video: discretionary income multiplied 4x when money redesigned for We the People (Don R.)

My one best paper on the topic of monetary and bank reforms from the 2015 Claremont Colleges’ conference, Seizing an Alternative Toward an Ecological Civilization. The benefits of these obvious solutions are ~$3 trillion to Americans yearly; equal to a 60% raise in household income.

Chart Of The Day: Median Stock More Over-Valued Than 2000 And 2007 (Aaron M.)

That at least is the message of an analysis released earlier this week by Ned Davis Research, the quantitative research firm. What caught my eye in the firm’s analysis was that, unlike virtually all others that conclude that stocks are overvalued, this one was not based on the so-called Shiller P/E — the cyclically-adjusted P/E ratio championed by Nobel laureate Robert Shiller of Yale University.

The 1% Versus The 99%: Realignment, Repression Or Revolution (richcabot)

Back in the Gilded Age, the country managed to convert the pressure that was building from the bottom up into meaningful changes that resulted in a realignment of political power and the rise of the middle class. Those gains, however, are now being reversed. In fact, a new report found that, for the first time in decades, the middle class no longer constitutes the economic majority in the United States.

More people are carrying knives – why? (Afridev)

Explanations for these increases include that numbers are approaching their average again, following years of historically low rates of knife-related crime and that the increase is a direct consequence of reduced use of stop and search by the police. Whatever the reason – and it is far too early to tell – one thing we can be certain of is the need to know more about why people carry and use weapons.

EXCLUSIVE: Sarin materials brought via Turkey & mixed in Syrian ISIS camps – Turkish MP to RT (Arthur Robey)

The investigation revealed that a number of Turkish citizens took part in negotiations with Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) representatives on the supply of sarin gas. Pointing to evidence cited in the criminal case, he said that wiretapped phone conversations proved that an Al-Qaeda militant, Hayyam Kasap, acquired sarin.

Hundreds of Records Broken as December Warmth Sends Temperatures Up To 30 Degrees Above Average (LesPhelps)

Although some cooler air has reached the western states, it is what meteorologists call a maritime polar air mass. This air mass is moving in from the northeastern Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Alaska, whose unfrozen waters have added some warmth and moisture to the air, moderating its chilly bite.

What climate ‘tipping points’ are – and how they could suddenly change our planet (Afridev)

There’s a 30% chance that at least one of these tipping points will be crossed over the next 200 years. This increases to 50% in the most aggressive warming scenario. However, the likelihood of crossing any individual tipping point is much lower, only a few percentage points. So the Himalayas will probably still retain at least some of their glaciers. You should still be able to stand on the North Pole in January. But, taken together, there’s a decent chance that something major will happen.

Five things you need to know about the Paris climate deal (Afridev)

There is a lot to like about this agreement: it gives a common goal to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, the overall emissions cuts stated are reasonably credible, there is a mechanism to increase national emissions cuts over time towards “net zero”, and there is funding secured to help poorer countries harness the power of the sun, wind and waves instead of coal, oil and gas. It provides a roadmap to get the world off its dangerous addiction to fossil fuel energy.

Inflated EIA Data Could Keep Oil Prices Subdued Next Year (Josh O.)

What is surprising is the extent to which investors not only adhere to this mentality but assist in it. We all know the adage “don’t fight the Fed,” which has been a longstanding unwritten Wall Street law so to speak. But what is now occurring is that Wall Street is following the Fed with disregard to underlying fundamentals.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 12/11/15

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

18 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Wall Street fears a run on junk bonds -- and worse

Third Avenue Ripples Hit Credit in Europe as Bond Risk Rises

Bloomberg-2 hours ago
The Markit iTraxx Asia index of credit-default swaps on corporate and sovereign debt, rose 2 basis points to 146 basis points as of 2:17 p.m. in Hong Kong, ...

Junk Bonds Stagger as Funds Flee

Wall Street Journal - ‎15 hours ago‎
Traders and regulators have fretted for more than a year that mayhem might ensue if U.S. mutual funds sought to sell rarely traded bond investments. After junk-bond prices posted their largest drop since 2011 on Friday, investors say they are bracing ...

Wall Street fears a run on junk bonds -- and worse

CBS News - ‎5 hours ago‎
Fasten your seat belts, investors. We may be in for a bumpy ride. Large-cap U.S. stocks suffered their worst one-day loss since September last Friday as many popular big-tech stocks -- such as Amazon (AMZN) and Facebook (FB) -- rolled over. And it ...

Junk Rated Stocks Flashing Same Signal as High-Yield Bond Market

Bloomberg - ‎9 hours ago‎
Think equity investors have been blind to warning signs coming from junk bonds? Not quite. For most of the year pessimists have warned that equity markets were missing signals in high-yield credit, where losses snowballed even as gauges like the ...

ECB's Mario Draghi committed to further stimulus if needed

Financial Times-3 hours ago
They also cut their deposit rate to a fresh record low of minus 0.3 per cent and agreed to buy municipal bonds alongside standard sovereign debt.
 

PBOC Defends Stance After Yuan Hits Four-Year Low

Nasdaq - ‎11 hours ago‎
Investors sold off the currency on speculation that the Chinese central bank would allow further weakening of the yuan as part of its potential move to loosen the yuan's de facto peg to the U.S. dollar and instead let it track a broad group of ...

S&P Warns It Could Cut Anglo American Rating to Junk

Nasdaq-36 minutes ago
... a downgrade to junk status wouldn't impact the company's financing costs. Anglo had net debt of $13.5 billion as of the end of June, or $11.9 billion on the July ...
 

Canadian Household Debt Hits Fresh High

Wall Street Journal - ‎2 hours ago‎
The country's net worth declined 1.3% to C$9.49 trillion ($6.91 trillion) in the third quarter, reflecting lower commodity prices. Excluding natural resources, net worth rose 1.7%. The latest report on household debt comes just days after the Canadian ...
 

Household debt level rises, hits 163.7 per cent of disposable income: StatsCan

CTV News - ‎2 hours ago‎
The increase came as disposable income increased 0.8 per cent, while household credit market debt grew 1.4. Total household credit market debt, which includes consumer credit, and mortgage and non-mortgage loans, reached $1.892 trillion. Consumer ...

Hong Kong Property Foreclosures Seen Doubling in 2016 on ...

Bloomberg-11 hours ago
At risk was President Xi Jinping's aim to keep the $10 trillion economy ... Left with a $28 trillion debt overhang after that spree, a new tack is now being taken.

School pension bill to hit 30 percent of employee salaries next year

Bucks County Courier Times (subscription)-6 hours ago
"The underfunding of PSERS has been the largest contributor to the existing $37.3 billion pension debt," the resolution stated. "Extending the use of rate collars ...

'Black Hole' in Funds Causes Deficit in Pensions

Greek Reporter-Dec 13, 2015
It appears that IKA has drawn the short straw in regards to this “secret” debt, since the fund's obligations to other public funds amounts to 11.26 billion euros.

Chicago teachers to announce whether they have votes for strike

Yahoo News-5 hours ago
The district, which serves about 400,000 students at more than 600 schools, faces a $1.1 billion structural deficit and thousands of possible teacher layoffs after ...

1000 defined benefit pension plans 'unlikely' to pay in full

Financial Times - ‎19 hours ago‎
The analysis indicated that a new regulatory objective, which allows employers to divert pension contributions to invest in business growth, was in “direct conflict” with their role to support trustees and simply served “to kick the [pension deficit ...

Audit: Unfunded liabilities in public workers pension grow to over ...

Watchdog.org-7 hours ago
LIABILITIES GROW: The unfunded liabilities for one of North Dakota's largest public worker pensions grew to over $680 million in 2015. The pension also added ...
 

Walker looks at borrowing to balance Alaska budget

Alaska Dispatch News-18 hours ago
Walker is also proposing $2.5 billion in borrowing for pension obligation bonds, to pay annual costs towards the state's unfunded liability. Hoffbeck said that ...
 

Cost of public-sector pensions equal to 85% of GDP, thinktank warns

The Recorder Journal (blog)-17 hours ago
... which has the largest proportion of unfunded schemes of the three countries, has the biggest problem. The public-sector pension cost in the USA and Canada ...

NYSUT outlines $416 million in 'liabilities' to the union's staff members

Albany Times Union-12 hours ago
That's the amount of future liabilities owed by the New York State United Teachers to the union's staff members, primarily for pension and health care costs, ...

Kazakhstan CDS jump, Eurobonds fall after tenge hits record low

Reuters-5 hours ago
Data from Markit showed that five-year credit default swaps rose 23 basis points (bps) to 314 bps, the highest since late-October. Kazakh dollar-denominated ...

Ouch! Here's How Much the Average Obamacare Penalty Will Run ...

Motley Fool-22 hours ago
We're also seeing big dollar differences in the underlying price of health insurance plans. The failure of more than half of Obamacare's approved healthcare ...

14800 Minnesotans face deep cuts to their pensions

Minneapolis Star Tribune-14 hours ago
Retired Teamsters argue that the current solution unfairly shifts the burden of a bailout onto them. They have a right to what they have earned, they say. “If they're ...

 

LesPhelps's picture
LesPhelps
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Why more people are carrying knives

Gibbs rule number 9, never leave home without a knife.

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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More than half of millennials have less than $1,000

More than half of millennials have less than $1,000

Afridev's picture
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I submitted this one,

And having made my own knives in the past, I totally agree. With the stigma on carrying knives in Europe I switched to Leatherman (think I have about 7 Leathermans). The Surge is always on my side, a piece of functional art; I'll be buried with one :o). Luckily in Sweden (in my corner at least) people take a no-nonsense approach to knives...

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Knives
Afridev wrote:

Luckily in Sweden (in my corner at least) people take a no-nonsense approach to knives...

I grew up in Texas, where there is no stigma on knives... or guns, for that matter.

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
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Imagination overload.

I'll  join the competition. I grew up in Rhodesia. Grenades were commonly carried without question. An excellent crowd disperser.

I tried without success to convince an Australian that No, he didn't have terrorists. Poor bloke was a victim of his imagination. 

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rjs
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different thought process on knives

i grew up in an Ohio suburb, and every kid in my neighborhood carried a small pocket knife...i never thought of mine as a weapon; it was an indispensable tool while playing in the nearby woods or fields...we fought like all kids fought but i cant remember ever fearing that one of the other kids would use his pocketknife as a weapon, nor would the thought cross for me to use mine in that manner...

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Arthur Robey wrote: I grew up
Arthur Robey wrote:

I grew up in Rhodesia. Grenades were commonly carried without question. An excellent crowd disperser.

I'm guessing the Grenades were not manufactured in Rhodesia.

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Knives, guns and grenades

Interesting how attitudes are different everywhere. In The Netherlands (and even stronger in the UK) knives are very much frowned upon. It is funny how people fall into 'camps' with certain objects. We seem to be hardwired to fall into black-and-white creed/ dogma. Is a knife a weapon or a tool, a gun a weapon or a tool, a grenade a weapon or a (fishing) tool? One extreme is The Netherlands/ UK, where there seems to be a pretty generalized stigma on 'weapons' (while losing sight of the fact that their history has been steeped in blood, and that weapons (and the threat of usage) were, and still are, used profusely to get to the relatively safe, rich and developed society that is there now).

I read with interest the discussions about gun control in the US, and how polarized that discussion is (then again, what is not polarized these days). I do like the approach used here in Sweden; you need to have a reason to have a firearm, that's either for hunting (proven through the possession of a hunting license) or for sports-shooting (proven through membership of a shooting club and taking part in competition). There are no other reasons allowed. To get a license for a firearm you need to go through a theoretical (e.g. safety and rules) and practical (e.g. safe handling, familiarity and precision) test, you have to have a weapons safe, and you go through a back-ground check looking at criminal and mental history. There are also restrictions as to how many guns you're allowed to have, and the type of gun allowed for specific uses. There are clear restrictions as to the 'state' of the weapon in specific circumstances (e.g. disassembled with one critical part removed, unloaded), and guns are not allowed in public areas. All legal guns are registered and a license is needed; in our province it takes 10 weeks to get a license approved. Contrary to The Netherlands there is a 'weapons culture' in rural parts of Sweden, but this is part of the 'hunting culture' with a level-headed, no-nonsense approach. Guns are tools for hunting. There are many hunting rifles around, less handguns. I come from a hunting family, have worked in conflict areas, and own guns as a sports-shooter and hunter. I'm at ease around guns, but would feel less comfortable if I'd knock on someone's door in the evening because my car broke down, if the person opening the door would be 'carrying'. I like the way things are in Sweden, with the current situation and level of violence that is around, the policy on guns and gun ownership seems to be based on common sense and adequate. When I go on my (dreaded) once a quarter visit to the shopping mall, and I look around, I'm actually quite happy that getting a gun is not that straightforward here (oh dear, did I just utter a micro-insult there devil).

I work in the domain of resilience, and one aspect of resilience is the existence of thresholds, that, when passed, make the system go from one (semi-)stable state into another. I think attitudes in society toward guns and gun control are subject to these kinds of thresholds. Could gun control work at this moment in the US? With the number of people who seem viscerally opposed to (any form of) it and the volume of (I suppose) unregistered guns around, it would probably take a lot of efforts and time to get to a society that has control of its guns and that manages the violence related to this. I think the US is in one stable state, and Europe is in another, my gut feeling is that the US situation is more stable than the European situation though. Ramblings of a confused mind…

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Good comment Afridev.

A grenade is a device use to kill and maim. No doubt about it. Rifles are the same. The reason you own them is to kill and maim.

I read somewhere that studies  have shown that the longer a nation is at peace the more Unthinkable violence becomes.  May your nation be forever at peace.

However. (There is always a However ) if your family is in mortal peril it is your moral obligation as a man to stand between them and the danger.  No doubt about it.  And if the situation calls for blood, make sure it is theirs and not yours.

There is no injunction against allowing gaining great pleasure from the pain and distress you are causing. You have to do the deed,  you may as well be guided by your well-honed instincts.  And then if you die will be laughing like a drain pipe. And die you will,  no doubt about it. 

One last observation. Women are precious objects. Men are disposable agents. Inwardly digest this fact. You will be a better man for it. 

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Additional ramblings

A brain is capable of producing the most beautiful poem and inspiring the most terrible acts. As with all tools we need to understand what their limits are.

Europe was built and formed through wars and conflict over millennia. The price at society and individual level that has been paid for the 'development' of our society has been staggering (but that's one of the mistakes we make, we think in 'individuals' and not in 'system' or 'process'). Society has a very short memory, and 'modern' Western society seems to have forgotten this. A quote from Heinlein: 'You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once'. We have assumed for too long that we could walk away with the cream, the money and the smile of the milk lady. Peak prosperity (amongst others) is making clear that we are getting ever closer to the point where uncomfortable choices will be forced upon us. Peace is beautiful, fleeting and atypical. Arthur, on this forum you're one of those who have seen war and lived the destruction of the society that was dear to you ('going to war' is one thing, 'having war coming to you' is another). Assuming we go through the adaptive cycle we will soon be solidly in the 'release' phase. I expect more mayhem before we get to the 'growth' phase again…

Your last observation has (to some extent) been digested already. It depends to some extent in what phase in the adaptive cycle we are. We haven't outgrown our cave-man ancestry (I think we regressed on many points). Maybe a good benchmark for when confronted with atypical situations; what would Rufus, my cave-dwelling great-great-…- grandfather make of this.wink

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Reuter Pics of countries with the most guns

http://www.reuters.com/news/picture/countries-with-the-most-guns?article...

Pic 7: Never saw somebody use a muzzle-loader as means of transport... devil

 

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'bout them Swiss....

I've always admired the Swiss system of an armed citizenry, but what's with them?  75% left handed shooters (if the picture is typical....)?  Does that say something about their society's ability to have such a system?  Ramblings.....Aloha, Steve.

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It does my heart good to see the role of weapons discussed

Though my personal visceral reaction at this stage of my life is more primed towards being a gun owner, I am very aware that the situation is complex, that there are many many factors at play.  Thanks for bringing your perspective and a thoughtful discussion to this talk Afridev.

There are several interactions pairs that need to be thought about:

1.  citizen on citizen

2.  government (as enforced by domestic military) vs citizen

3.  sociopathic citizen conducting criminal business vs law abiding citizen

4.  rural locations vs densely packed cities.

5.  random bullets flying from nearby gun shots

 

And finally the role of statistics to justify a position must be watched like a hawk:

1.  Are we interested in "homicides" or "gun homicides"

2.  Are we concerned with "gun violence" without recognizing that there is "good" and "bad" gun violence.  For example, A gun can be used to force a rape or prevent a rape ("good" vs "bad" gun violence).

3.  And legal policies enacted "for public safety" that have the effect of concentrating weapons in the hands of a particular group-- sociopaths, or the domestic military who serve psychopaths!!

-------------------------

Edit:  I suppose that I would want one restrictive set of gun policies if I felt that:

1.  Society was stable

2.  I trusted TPTB and felt comfortable with their agents holding control of all the firearms.  ("Power grows from the barrel of a gun...." Mao and all that)

3.  I did not have the sense that "the world is about to blow up" and that TPTB might go and get real nasty in the process.

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A Knife is a Tool.

A knife is a tool; one of the earliest tools ever used by man. A knife can be used to create other tools and weapons. It must be mankind's most useful discovery after fire and certainly more universally applicable than the wheel. To think of a knife as primarily a weapon is to have an incredibly narrow and paranoid view of the world.

I always carry a knife and usually use it several times a day for such things as opening cardboard boxes, sharpening pencils and other routine and mundane tasks. The idea of using it to attack someone never crosses my mind.

All this hysteria about knives and guns is a modern phenomenon. When I was young, nobody even gave a second thought to either of these useful tools being anything other than...just tools.

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Sand_puppy, Thanks for your

Sand_puppy,

Thanks for your reply, a couple of thoughts on your points, assuming that the context remains more or less as it is now.

sand_puppy wrote:

1.  citizen on citizen

In a society where rule of law is upheld and the environment is relatively safe, the issue of responsible citizen on responsible citizen should not be a problem except for accidents. The risk of accidents increases with number of guns around, responsibility of their owners and attitude of the owners.

Where rule of law disappears people will naturally revolve to carrying and using guns. I prefer the current situation where the state has the monopoly on using violence. I visited/ worked in places where rule of law was (practically) absent (e.g. Somalia, slums in Guatemala). I think the state should have enough capacity to uphold security (and should have this monopoly) as the alternative is gangs, mob lynching and witch hunting. When the state is gone, we're in Somalia, but worse, we wouldn't really have the protection a 'clan' offers. 'Responsible' citizens wouldn't last long in this context... Should we apply more common sense to self-defense than we have now in Europe? Yes we should, but we shouldn't go too far either. There should obviously be a transparent and equitable system of governance and presence and respect of citizens rights.

sand_puppy wrote:

2.  government (as enforced by domestic military) vs citizen

There is a 'sweet' spot with regard to the role and the power a government should have; Somalia is not good, and neither is Pinochet Chili. A too strong or repressive state is another extreme. With the technological capacity and 'volume' of modern armies, I think an 'armed' citizenry is more of a nuisance than a realistic opponent as it lacks the hardware, the organisation, and the capacity to absorb 'acceptable losses', so it doesn't pose an existential threat (or even risk) to the state. The risk is also that an armed (and hostile) citizenry will just give the state the excuse to become more repressive and violent. We don't want an 'us' and 'them'; police and army should be well integrated in society to avoid issues; one of the reasons why I didn't like the abolishment of military service in The Netherlands... This should be solved through political involvement of the people in communities (I think).

sand_puppy wrote:

3.  sociopathic citizen conducting criminal business vs law abiding citizen

This would include terrorists I assume. As tragic and horrible the loss of individuals is for the individual families and communities (and I in no way try to say it's OK), at society level the impact is in reality limited (the reaction to this is not however). Way more people die through traffic accidents. I believe pacifists are naive and don't understand how the world works, but with the current situation in Europe/ Sweden, I'm not considering this a problem that I would need to give much more consideration then I do now (having been in conflict zones my background awareness of what is going on is already quite high), and I guess I would consider it to be the same if I'd live in the US.

sand_puppy wrote:

4.  rural locations vs densely packed cities.

Hmm, need to think this one through a bit more...

sand_puppy wrote:

5.  random bullets flying from nearby gun shots

The more guns that are being fired in populated areas by people high on adrenaline who don't have a good control of themselves and/ or their gun, the higher the risk that innocent bystanders get hit. As everything in life, there is a balance between 'pro-' and 'contra-'... Society needs to make that call.

Got to go now, more thoughts (opinions) for tomorrow smiley

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Sand_puppy follow-up

 

Don't have the impression there is that much interest in the discussion except for us, also have a couple of things that need finishing today, so will not make it too long.

 

Here some additional thoughts/ opinions on where I left yesterday:

sand_puppy wrote:

4.  rural locations vs densely packed cities.

Two different scenarios here, the current 'normal', where all are (should be) legal equals and this split would not be relevant. When things start going awry the scenario changes and there will most likely be a move from city to country-side, here it really depends on the level of lawlessness that would accompany this move. Here one has to adapt to the situation.

What are the guiding principles here? Is it 'laws' or what is 'just', is it 'rules' or is it 'common sense', is it 'love thy neighbour' or is it 'basic survival'. Context will dictate what the best course to follow is; adaptability is a key component of resilience (as is timely detecting shifts in context). I think one of the challenges at personal level will be to figure out when what approach is most adequate, and be able to accept this.

sand_puppy wrote:

1.  Are we interested in "homicides" or "gun homicides"

Both are important, as both are indicators (symptoms) for similar, but not identical, societal issues. I haven't looked into this but there probably are social/ cultural, economic/ financial, political, access issues that lead to "homicides" and "gun homicides". We would want to know what people die of, no? Poisoning, traffic, cancer, infectious disease. If we want to understand the context we should be able to look and (rationally) analyse the information we have.

sand_puppy wrote:

2.  Are we concerned with "gun violence" without recognizing that there is "good" and "bad" gun violence.  For example, A gun can be used to force a rape or prevent a rape ("good" vs "bad" gun violence).

Agreed, a gun is value-neutral. It is what is done with them that makes it a tool for the good or the bad. The 'good' and 'bad' gun are not equal though. One 'bad' gun can cause much harm, however, it takes a huge number of 'good' guns to outbalance one 'bad' gun. And the 'good' guns need to be used and stored adequately to avoid harm to innocent bystanders, something that is not a given. I'm pretty sure that having a lot of 'good' guns around will also make the 'bad' guns more aggressive; action -> reaction.

sand_puppy wrote:

3.  And legal policies enacted "for public safety" that have the effect of concentrating weapons in the hands of a particular group-- sociopaths, or the domestic military who serve psychopaths!!

Making rules that work in a complex environment is very challenging and always a simplification. I'm convinced that there is a general and large issue of competency and understanding of the complexity of those that make the rules, I think the majority of 'stupid' policies are caused by this. Our monkey brains ask for simple and easy solutions, and our monkey-brained 'governors' give them to us, we then vote for the suckers that give us the easiest and simplest solutions and we're all glad. Then things fall apart because life and solutions needed aren't simple and easy, and we're angry and start looking for the sucker(s) we can blame… Lather rinse repeat. We have created a society, systems and technologies that our brains have not been able to grasp yet. 

There are surely also policies that are darker and meant to manipulate (911 is fishy, as are other events…). Can this be avoided by an armed populace? Not anymore I think (see earlier post), this will have to be addressed politically.

A side thought and question. What do a Class 8 truck, a plane, cyanide, high explosives, radioactive material, a 1,000 gallon gasoline tank in residential area, and a full-automatic assault rifle have in common (there, I put all keywords that will make the snoopers monitors go 'code red' in one phrasedevil)? They all have the potential to cause mayor harm if used/ installed/ managed wrongly. Some will face restrictions (or need special licences), others do not. Does this make sense?

sand_puppy wrote:

Edit:  I suppose that I would want one restrictive set of gun policies if I felt that:

1.  Society was stable

2.  I trusted TPTB and felt comfortable with their agents holding control of all the firearms.  ("Power grows from the barrel of a gun...." Mao and all that)

3.  I did not have the sense that "the world is about to blow up" and that TPTB might go and get real nasty in the process.

Agreed, as I made clear before, I'm not anti-gun. I like the Swedish down-to-earth approach and culture to guns and gun-control, I think it is a rational approach with regard to guns and the potential risks to society they pose, and I don't feel (very) limited by it. Everybody is different though. I just try to add some depth to the discussions on guns and gun control with some (surely biased) thoughts and opinions.

 

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