Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 11/29 - Cycling For Free Electricity, The Science Of Gratitude

Sunday, November 29, 2015, 11:51 AM

Economy

A Wealthy Governor and His Friends Are Remaking Illinois (jdargis)

Their wealth has forcefully shifted the state’s balance of power. Last year, the families helped elect as governor Bruce Rauner, a Griffin friend and former private equity executive from the Chicago suburbs, who estimates his own fortune at more than $500 million. Now they are rallying behind Mr. Rauner’s agenda: to cut spending and overhaul the state’s pension system, impose term limits and weaken public employee unions.

GOP In Panic Over Trump (richcabot)

Add to all this the fact that Trump’s lead over the rest of the GOP field has expanded since the terrorist attacks in Paris, and it becomes clear why anxiety among his many Republican critics is reaching new heights.

“He has a real shot at this. He is the clear front-runner,” said Ron Bonjean, a consultant and former aide to GOP leaders on Capitol Hill.

How Russians See the West and Russia (richcabot)

After a year and a half of conducting research on Russia, the world’s largest country, mostly for a book I co-authored on the history of post-Soviet U.S.-Russia relations and its context for the Ukraine conflict, it was time for me to finally go see this beautiful, fascinating and complex nation in person and to meet its people on their own terms and territory.

E.U. Offers Turkey 3 Billion Euros to Stem Migrant Flow (jdargis)

Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, according to diplomats, will be promised 3 billion euros in European aid and other inducements in exchange for Turkish action to stop migrants, most of them from the Middle East and Afghanistan, from reaching Greece and other countries on Europe’s outer fringe. Mr. Davutoglu is standing in for Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, at the Brussels meeting.

The Rise of Anti-Black Friday Branding (jdargis)

It’s an ad, unsurprisingly, but it’s an ad with a strange objective: to tell you not to buy stuff. Or, at least, to spend a day not buying stuff. “At T.J. Maxx, Marshall’s, and HomeGoods, we’re closed on Thanksgiving,” the spot’s velvet-voiced narrator informs us, “because family time comes first.” And then: more music. More scenes of familiar/familial delights. More laughter. More pie. The whole thing concludes: “Let’s put more value on what really matters. This season, bring back the holidays—with T.J. Maxx, Marshall’s, and HomeGoods.”

The Science Of Gratitude (jdargis)

In the case of gratitude, scientists consider that the desired behavior is forming bonds of trust with others. We naturally help our relatives because what’s good for them helps promote the genes that we share with them. But why should we ever help out a non-relative? We might expend valuable resources and get nothing back. That’s a key problem in evolutionary theory. Yet researchers agree that there’s a benefit to being part of a wider, cooperative community that can protect you in difficult times.

The idea behind cycling for free electricity (Ali S.)

Manoj Bhargava, founder and CEO of Living Essentials, explains how his Free Electric bikes help to power whole households.

Secret Reserves (jdargis)

There are fewer than six hundred Sápara left in the world, according to the Ecuadorian government (although the number is subject to a long-standing controversy). This is a little more than the four hundred and twenty-five gondoliers in Venice. In Llanchamacocha, where Manari lives, the head count doesn’t reach thirty.

But the woman insists: “You should learn to sing.”

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 11/27/15

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

8 Comments

LesPhelps's picture
LesPhelps
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 30 2009
Posts: 728
Electric Generating Bicycle

I want one!  We have an exercise bike in the basement that gets heavy use when the outside weather is not conducive to bicycling.

Too bad there wasn't info on how to design and build one in the video clip. 

locksmithuk's picture
locksmithuk
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 19 2011
Posts: 114
DIY bicycle electricity generator
LesPhelps wrote:

I want one!  We have an exercise bike in the basement that gets heavy use when the outside weather is not conducive to bicycling.

Too bad there wasn't info on how to design and build one in the video clip. 

 

You could do worse than to head over to Open Source Ecology. On their Faceache page there's already a DIY video to assemble a 'normal' bicycle. Someone over there is bound to be able to point you in the right direction for an electric version for domestic use.

Boomer41's picture
Boomer41
Status: Silver Member (Online)
Joined: Nov 30 2008
Posts: 132
Electricity Generating Bicycle

This is ridiculous! Even a Tour de France cyclist can only generate 250 watts.   In other words a TdF cyclist pedaling for one hour could power a single 100 watt light bulb for 2.5 hours.

The average California household uses 18 kWH of electricity per day.  (If Barbra Streisand is excluded, it might be only 15 kWH.)  Pedaling for one hour, you would have to generate 18 kW or 24 horsepower - the equivalent of 72 Tour riders!
Speaking from experience, I know my power output is a whole lot less than Bradley Wiggins so one hour of me on the bike would barely run the Christmas tree lights.

webbrowan's picture
webbrowan
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 8 2015
Posts: 3
Everyone is trying their very

Everyone is trying their very best to contribute toward green efforts worldwide at both individual and commercial levels alike. Hence, to cycle in order to get free electricity is not only environmentally-friendly but also promotes healthy living too. It is a win-win situation for everyone.

LesPhelps's picture
LesPhelps
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 30 2009
Posts: 728
Good point
Boomer41 wrote:

This is ridiculous! Even a Tour de France cyclist can only generate 250 watts.   In other words a TdF cyclist pedaling for one hour could power a single 100 watt light bulb for 2.5 hours.

The average California household uses 18 kWH of electricity per day.  (If Barbra Streisand is excluded, it might be only 15 kWH.)  Pedaling for one hour, you would have to generate 18 kW or 24 horsepower - the equivalent of 72 Tour riders!
Speaking from experience, I know my power output is a whole lot less than Bradley Wiggins so one hour of me on the bike would barely run the Christmas tree lights.

It's always good to do the math.  But I don't use 100 watt light bulbs, when 23 watt bulbs will do the trick.  Therefore, according to your math, I could power one light bulb for almost 11 hours, with one hour of riding.  Plus, right now, the exercise energy is returning nothing but better muscles.

If you are seriously still using 100 watt bulbs, you are not one of the people I look to for how to improve my lifestyle.  I put 100 watt bulbs in the same category as trucks and SUV's.

Waterdog14's picture
Waterdog14
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 18 2014
Posts: 120
More reason to switch to LEDs
Boomer41 wrote:

... a TdF cyclist pedaling for one hour could power a single 100 watt light bulb for 2.5 hours.

The average California household uses 18 kWH of electricity per day. 

100-watt light bulbs are from the dark ages (pun intended).  Switch to LED lights, and you'll get the equivalent lumens for only 17 watts.  And the bulbs will last 25,000 hrs. 

If US households had to cycle for their energy, perhaps more people would begin to conserve.  Having to do real Work (in the physics sense) for our energy would be eye-opening.  We really do live "like kings of old" thanks to cheap energy.  

Quercus bicolor's picture
Quercus bicolor
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 19 2008
Posts: 456
bikes and electric

The people in India will be using little 0.5, 1 or 2 watt LED task lights, 10-20 watt small fans, tablets (5-10W?) and phone charges (<1W).  Even a 60W equivalent LED can come in at 8W. 

Boomer41's picture
Boomer41
Status: Silver Member (Online)
Joined: Nov 30 2008
Posts: 132
LED Lightbulbs

I used the example of a 100 watt light bulb simply because it is an electrical load most people can relate to. There is already plenty of confusion about kWH, Horsepower, Watts and other arcane terms, so expecting non-technical readers to imagine what 250 watt.hr means,  without an easy to understand example, would be less than helpful.

Of course, I no longer have any incandescent lights in my home. They were all replaced by LEDs long ago. I won't recoup my investment any time soon, but it is a great comfort to know that my battery backup system will keep me going much longer than if I had not upgraded.

Nevertheless, I still think that the claim by Manoj Bhargava that one hour of pedaling can power a household for a whole day is preposterous. Even with purely LED lighting and minimal electrical appliances a household which consumes an average of only 10 watts is primitive indeed. Not to mention that 250 watt.hr is an absolute maximum which can only be produced by a world class athlete. Most of us would be lucky to produce half that amount.

Judging from the images of the bicycle it will cost at least as much as a solar panel and battery, a system which will be much more practical. I am sure that anyone who has worked in the fields all day has no desire or need to improve his or her physical condition by pedaling a bike for another hour.

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