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Daily Digest 1/5 - Five Geopolitical Predictions for 2015, Less Regulation For Homeschooling

Monday, January 5, 2015, 11:53 AM

Economy

Home Schooling: More Pupils, Less Regulation (jdargis)

“We believe that because parents who make this commitment to teach their children at home are dedicated and self-motivated, there’s just not a real need for the state to be involved in overseeing education,” said Dewitt T. Black III, senior counsel for the Home School Legal Defense Association, which has close ties to local Christian home-school associations. Mr. Black wrote an early version of the bill that eventually passed here.

"Now There's Not Even Soap" Maduro Heads To China To 'Save' Socialist Utopia Venezuela (pinecarr)

"It's a very important tour... to tackle new projects to address the circumstances affecting our country, including the depletion of revenues due to plummeting oil prices," Maduro said in a radio and television address from the Miraflores presidential palace.

Maduro said he would discuss economic, financial, energy, technological, educational and development projects with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Thomas Piketty Won 2014 (jdargis)

Even before Capital became a phenomenon, Piketty was one of the people most responsible for the way we talk about inequality today. After all, he and his collaborators, including University of California–Berkeley economist Emmanuel Saez, had pioneered the tax-data analysis that shed light on the incomes of the top 1 percent and gave Occupy Wall Street its stickiest slogans.

Breaking Ground On The Nicaragua Canal (jdargis)

At the event in Managua, Ortega promised that the canal would help to reduce poverty in Nicaragua, the poorest country, after Haiti, in the Western Hemisphere. Wang has promised as many as fifty thousand jobs for Nicaraguans during its construction, and said that the project ultimately will employ two hundred thousand people. But the canal has plenty of skeptics, including several hundred protestors who blocked roads and clashed with police during the groundbreaking. Many shouted “Fuera chinos” (“Out with the Chinese”) and “Vendepatria,” an epithet for someone who sells his own homeland, in reference to Ortega’s support for Wang.

Five Geopolitical Predictions for 2015 (Evan K.)

One year ago today, the world mulled over the global ramifications of Turkish anti-government protests, Chinese escalation in the East China Sea, and the imminent US military withdrawal from the Middle East. With the global economy finally on the mend, the post-shutdown US government abstained from military engagement in Iraq and Syria, instead seeking reconciliation through diplomacy with Russia and nuclear negotiations with Iran. A year later, however, the tables have turned. Russian aggression in Ukraine has exposed rifts in NATO alliances as Western sanctions bring the Russian economy to its knees. The US-led campaign against Islamic State has erased any memory of US military disengagement from the Middle East, dragging regional and global players into ongoing civil wars in Iraq and Syria. And yet, as global oil prices continue their fall, promises of reform in India, Mexico, and Indonesia beg investor confidence.

Scientific team sounds the alarm on sugar as a source of disease (Arthur Robey)

The FDA is considering a proposal to require food manufacturers to list information on sugars in the same way they do for fats, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates and protein. But because so much added sugar is dumped into so many products, one average American breakfast of cereal would likely exceed a reasonable daily limit.

Why All Calories Are Not Created Equal: Dr. Robert Lustig on the Science of Sugar (jdargis)

According to Dr. Lustig, it’s not calories alone, but sugar and refined carbohydrates (i.e. processed food) that is driving the obesity epidemic. Contrary to popular belief, “A calorie,” he says, “is not a calorie.” In the following conversation he describes the difference between ingesting 160 calories of almonds and 160 calories of soda. Plus, he discusses why there is no recommended daily allowance of sugar on nutrition labels and what exactly “made with whole grains” means on the back of your cereal box.

Big polluters: one massive container ship equals 50 million cars (Dana T.)

The title of world’s largest container ship is actually held by eight identical ships owned by Danish shipping line Mærsk. All eight ships are 1300ft (397.7m) long and can carry 15,200 shipping containers around the globe at a steady 25.5 knots (47.2 km/h, 29.3 mph) . The only thing limiting the size of these ships is the Suezmax standard, which is the term used to define the the largest ships capable of transiting the Suez Canal fully loaded. These ships far surpass the Panamax standard (ships that can fit through the Panama Canal), which is limited to ships capable of carrying 5,000 shipping containers.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 1/2/15

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

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6 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 4145
Tall's picture
Tall
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 18 2010
Posts: 564
Medicaid Is Too Cheap?

Thanks for the article on health care spending Sax.

I suggest that in contrast to this opinion piece, Medicaid is not too cheap. It likely represents where we should be on health care spending per person in this country.

http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2015-01-04/medicaid-is-too-cheap

phecksel's picture
phecksel
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: May 24 2010
Posts: 204
Tall, I would suggest we need

Tall,

I would suggest we need a complete paradigm shift in medical care.  I'll use a personal example.

I injured my "knee" carrying a box that was way too heavy up the stairs.  I saw my Md, who sent me for xrays and MRI.  Then i saw a specialist, then a surgeon.  Then back to my Md.  Then a rehab specialist.  Then 2 sessions of a dozen or so of actual rehab.  all while taking  way too much prescribed Ibuprofen, which almost killed me due to a massive stomach bleed.  

Out of desperation to find a solution, I found a chiropractor who specialized in joint issues.  He listened to my story, watched me walk, and said "your problem is in your back" and then proceeded to show me exactly why and how he was going to fix it.  Several visits with him and was cured.  My spine was compressed where the nerve bundle exited to go to my knee.

A relative was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer.  Still, they found a reason to do exploratory surgery AND do chemo.  Already diagnosed as terminal, what is the point of all the extra "care".  the excuse was the potential slight improvement in patient longevity.  Ever seen someone going through chemo?  And the data I saw said the chemo reduced patient longevity in terminal cases, not improve it.

/soapbox

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 3936
Modern Medicine.

I hear that the medical industry has been hijacked by the insurance, Big Pharma and legal industry in the USA. Doctors are not encouraged to practice medicine.

They are taught how to prescribe pills and steered away from results based procedures. The Cubans doctors are not as modern and reflect well.

KugsCheese's picture
KugsCheese
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 2 2010
Posts: 1447
phecksel wrote: Tall, I would
phecksel wrote:

Tall,

I would suggest we need a complete paradigm shift in medical care.  I'll use a personal example.

I injured my "knee" carrying a box that was way too heavy up the stairs.  I saw my Md, who sent me for xrays and MRI.  Then i saw a specialist, then a surgeon.  Then back to my Md.  Then a rehab specialist.  Then 2 sessions of a dozen or so of actual rehab.  all while taking  way too much prescribed Ibuprofen, which almost killed me due to a massive stomach bleed.  

Out of desperation to find a solution, I found a chiropractor who specialized in joint issues.  He listened to my story, watched me walk, and said "your problem is in your back" and then proceeded to show me exactly why and how he was going to fix it.  Several visits with him and was cured.  My spine was compressed where the nerve bundle exited to go to my knee.

A relative was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer.  Still, they found a reason to do exploratory surgery AND do chemo.  Already diagnosed as terminal, what is the point of all the extra "care".  the excuse was the potential slight improvement in patient longevity.  Ever seen someone going through chemo?  And the data I saw said the chemo reduced patient longevity in terminal cases, not improve it.

/soapbox

 

My doctor/researcher friend who went Galt calls it SIckcare.   Why?  The patient is the source of revenue and goal is to use as many hospital services as possible to boost revenue.  What other biz can cut list price 70% (for the insuranced)?

Tall's picture
Tall
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 18 2010
Posts: 564
Sickcare is a good name for it

Steven Brill is an industry analyst and a patient.

Here is his take on it: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/01/05/375024427/americas-bitter-pil...

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