Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 8/24 - Iceland Volcano Begins Erupting, Is Corruption Constitutional?

Sunday, August 24, 2014, 9:30 AM

Economy

The Crooked And The Dead (jdargis)

Cuomo is up for reëlection in November, but first he has to win a Democratic primary, on September 9th, against an improbable challenger: Zephyr Teachout, a constitutional-law professor at Fordham University. The week before the Times published its report, nearly ninety per cent of New York voters either didn’t know her name or had no opinion about her. Teachout has never held an elected office; she has little experience and less support. She’s not so much campaigning for office as campaigning for reform. Shortly before the primary, her first book will be released. It’s called “Corruption in America.”

When ‘shoot for the stars’ no longer applies (jdargis)

Ever heard the phrase, “do what you love and the money will follow”? That’s the worst one of them all, wrote Cheryl Woodhouse. “Whoever came up with this clearly didn't understand basic business, or economics,” Woodhouse said. “What if you love drinking beer? Or watching TV? Or hanging out with your friends? I find it hard to believe that someone will pay you for those things.

Iceland Volcano Begins Erupting, Sparking Red Alert

Iceland put the Coast Guard on standby and issued a red alert to the aviation industry Saturday after detecting a small subglacial eruption of lava under an ice cap at the Bardarbunga volcano — one of the country's largest. Data from radar and web cameras show no visible signs of eruption at the surface level that would suggest ash will be shot into the atmosphere. However, Iceland's Meteorological Office is taking all precautions and the red alert level indicates an eruption could occur at any point.

Iceland Backtracks on Volcano Eruption as Quakes Intensify (jdargis)

“Probably, earthquakes near the Bardarbunga caldera are a consequence of adjustment to changes in pressure because of the flow of magma from under the caldera into the dike, which stretches to Dyngjujokull, more than 25 kilometers away,” the Met Office said. “No signs of tremor, indicative of eruption, were detected during the night.”

In Eastern Ukraine, Rebel Mockery Amid Independence Celebration (jdargis)

“They are attacking our city,” said Tonya Koralova, 46, a nurse who watched the men pass. “They are fascists. I am in favor of this parade.”

The anti-independence day parade staged by the main rebel group in eastern Ukraine, the Donetsk People’s Republic, was one of its most provocative public affronts to the Ukrainian government to date. It contrasted sharply with the traditional military parade in Kiev, the national capital, where soldiers from the national army crisply saluted the president and crowds of cheering citizens on Sunday.

In Washington, Second Thoughts on Arming Police (jdargis)

“The whole country and every representative and senator have seen the visuals, and at some level, it made all of us uncomfortable,” said Senator Claire McCaskill, Democrat of Missouri, a member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee who will lead a hearing in September into police use of military-style equipment. “It’s a moment where we can take a timeout and look at these policies.”

Where The Five-Day Workweek Came From (jdargis)

The roots of the seven-day week can be traced back about 4,000 years, to Babylon. The Babylonians believed there were seven planets in the solar system, and the number seven held such power to them that they planned their days around it. Their seven-day, planetary week spread to Egypt, Greece, and eventually to Rome, where it turns out the Jewish people had their own version of a seven-day week. (The reason for this is unclear, but some have speculated that the Jews adopted this after their exile in Babylon in the sixth century B.C.) At the very latest, the seven-day week was firmly entrenched in the Western calendar about 250 years before Christ was born.

Activism And Integrity (Eric G.)

Truth be told, my goal here is not to belittle Bill McKibben, nor is it to scold climate activists in particular or activists more generally. My goal is to invite people to look at the role integrity plays in activist pursuits, particularly those that ask people to change their behavior or to submit to legislative acts that seek to constrain it. How can activists expect to be taken seriously when they willfully behave in ways that run counter to the ideals they advocate? What’s going on in the mind and heart of an individual who claims to hold one set of values, but whose lifestyle advertises a very different suite? How effective can a group of activists expect to be when they’re unwilling to live the changes they work so hard to impose on others? I think these questions are worth sitting with, for activists in particular, but really for everyone.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 8/22/14

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

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1 Comment

HughK's picture
HughK
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 6 2012
Posts: 760
Fat thumb on the scale: Earth's land animals by weight.

Those that follow Ugo Bardi's blog may have already seen this little doozie, drawn by xkcd.

It would be interesting to see how much marine mammals change the picture, of course.

(Still over disk quota, so I can't post the pic.)

 

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