Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 6/20 - The Boomerang Kids Won't Leave, The Do’s and Don’ts of Water Usage

Friday, June 20, 2014, 10:25 AM

Economy

Australian troops sent to Iraq to help secure embassy (jdargis)

“Strong and capable armed forces, which have made a very significant contribution to conflicts in our region and further afield,” he told reporters in Sydney on Friday.

“But let's wait and see what, if any, requests come our way. We will carefully consider them. And I have to say that I do support the careful and measured response that President Obama has made to this.”

Beijing has almost the same population as these countries (jdargis)

Chinese President Xi Jinping recognizes the population swell in the country's urban locations. As more than 50 percent of China's population live in urban areas, AFP reported that Xi believes authorities need to "strictly control the size of the population in especially large cities." His solution? Rolling out a residential permit system, though it remains unclear how this will help quell population growth.

A Glimpse of Syrian Lives Ravaged by War in Homs (jdargis)

Homs has long been regarded by opponents of President Bashar al-Assad as “the capital of the revolution,” and as Ms. Barnard reported, life there bears little resemblance to the normal circumstances she witnessed on previous visits.

It’s Official: The Boomerang Kids Won’t Leave (jdargis)

Some may hope that the boomerang generation represents an unfortunate but temporary blip — that the class of 2015 will be able to land great jobs out of college, and that they’ll reach financial independence soon after reaching the drinking age. But the latest recession was only part of the boomerang generation’s problem. In reality, it simply amplified a trend that had been growing stealthily for more than 30 years. Since 1980, the U.S. economy has been destabilized by a series of systemic changes — the growth of foreign trade, rapid advances in technology, changes to the tax code, among others — that have affected all workers but particularly those just embarking on their careers.

25 Shocking Facts About The Earth’s Dwindling Water Resources (June C.)

#17 - As underground aquifers are relentlessly drained in California, some areas of the San Joaquin Valley are sinking by 11 inches a year.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Water Usage (jdargis)

DON’T: Start planting in the middle of the summer — or water during afternoon hours. The extra heat means evaporation, and that means wasted water.

DON’T: Waste food. Tossing out edible produce or half-eaten meals is a huge source of water loss. All told, 25 percent of the water used in the U.S. every year goes to food that no one eats. Make sure, says O’Connor, to buy what “you actually use.”

More on the Energetics of Food Distribution (Eric G.)

Given this wide variation in the calorie density of food, it should come as no surprise that the energy input/output ratio – or perhaps more accurately the energy input/food throughput ratio – of food distribution depends not just on how food is moved and how far, but also on what type of food is being moved. An energy intensive mode of distribution that moves a very calorie dense food might yield an energy input/throughput ratio comparable or even superior to a far more efficient mode of transport that moves a less energy dense food. The devil, as they say, is in the details.

The World’s Top Polluters And What They’re Doing About It (James S.)

There are still a few people in the world who dispute the existence of climate change, and even more who doubt that it is down to human activity. The vast majority of nations, however, accept that CO2 emissions are a problem and have voiced concern. But, as always in human endeavor, talk is cheap. Actually doing something to control greenhouse gas emissions puts countries at a huge economic disadvantage. As long as coal and oil are the cheapest energy sources, unilaterally attempting to reduce their use could have a disastrous effect on a country’s competitiveness. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has released a report that estimates new Environmental Protection Agency regulations designed to cut U.S. emissions will cost $50 billion per year.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 6/19/14

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

7 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 4149
Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 3936
Don't Waste Food.

DON’T: Waste food. Tossing out edible produce or half-eaten meals is a huge source of water loss. All told, 25 percent of the water used in the U.S. every year goes to food that no one eats. Make sure, says O’Connor, to buy what “you actually use.”

As a single person, how can you eat a whole cabbage, with no waste? You turn it into sauerkraut. Smash it into pulp and add salt to make brine (no extra water), keep oxygen out and flavour it with dill.

I eat 5 cabbages in 3 months.

Corollary: Don't eat food-like substances. Learn to Love your Liver.

KugsCheese's picture
KugsCheese
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 2 2010
Posts: 1447
For those that like to drink

For those that like to drink sensibly (I love a good red wine) we have http://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/Item01440/Anti-Alcohol-Antioxidants-with-HepatoProtection-Complex.html to protect liver and the rest of the body.  Really works; hand them out to your loved ones.  React badly to red wine?  Take a capsule and drink one red wine and wait...no problem!

efarmer.ny's picture
efarmer.ny
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 7 2012
Posts: 60
More on Energetics

Once again, I take issue with the examination of energetics and the distribution of food.

My brother drives a big pickup truck to his job as a truck driver (asphalt-type company) every work day. I'm guessing it is about 20 miles one way.

We know two farming families fairly well. They live on their farm. My wife is guessing their markets are 20 miles away or less, and they go to the markets two or three times a week. So if a farmer drives his pickup truck to market, AND THE MARKET IS HIS PLACE OF WORK then this skews the analysis. Granted, my farming friends burn more gas hauling their produce than my brother with his empty truck, but I think you can see my point.

So when I see the fuel which all the semi-truck drivers use to get to work added to this study, I will start to take it seriously.

SailAway's picture
SailAway
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 11 2010
Posts: 404
watering your garden with gray water from your washer
Arthur Robey wrote:

DON’T: Waste food. Tossing out edible produce or half-eaten meals is a huge source of water loss. All told, 25 percent of the water used in the U.S. every year goes to food that no one eats. Make sure, says O’Connor, to buy what “you actually use.”

As a single person, how can you eat a whole cabbage, with no waste? You turn it into sauerkraut. Smash it into pulp and add salt to make brine (no extra water), keep oxygen out and flavour it with dill.

I eat 5 cabbages in 3 months.

Corollary: Don't eat food-like substances. Learn to Love your Liver.

KDO:  By watering your garden with gray water from your washer, you can keep your plants fed while avoiding hundreds of gallons from going down the tubes. (But make sure you only use biodegradable, nontoxic soap.)

That sounds like a great idea. Anybody doing this and could recommend soap?
 
earthwise's picture
earthwise
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2009
Posts: 848
Greywater Guru

Art Ludwig is the go-to guy on all things graywater. I bought his pamphlets back in the 90's; they are a comprehensive guide that I can't recommend highly enough. Here's the link to one of his booklets regarding laundry graywater: http://oasisdesign.net/greywater/laundry/   There are others, too. The branched drain systems he illustrates in his other books are simply elegant and elegantly simple. Way cool. 

The "Builders Greywater Guide" that I have contains an Appendix 1 that shows a chart with most of the common household detergents and soaps with their respective levels of Boron, Sodium, Phosphate, etc. He demonstrates that graywater discharged onto land is far less of a concern than into waterways. There appears to be nothing toxic to humans from these products and only the salts are toxic to plants. Phosphates are actually a fertilizer especially for aquatic plants. I have a project in the works where I will use my graywater to form a small pond where I will grow azolla, a nitrogen-fixing floating aquatic plant with a multitude of uses from duck and chicken feed (as well as other livestock) to fertilizer. After the water is filtered by the azolla, it will then flow to the duck pond from where it will be distributed to the landscape. 

SailAway's picture
SailAway
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 11 2010
Posts: 404
Re: Greywater Guru

Thanks earthwise, great information I appreciate it. 

The laundry graywater system that he shows seems very doable at my house.

Fred

 

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