Daily Digest

Image by Yves Remedios, Flickr Creative Commons

Daily Digest 4/19 - Listen To The Plants, The Cost Of Coal

Saturday, April 19, 2014, 3:30 PM

Economy

In Queens, Chickens Clash With the Rules (Nervous Nelly)

The rules were set down in 1913, during the infancy of this 140-acre, leafy swath that is one of America’s oldest planned communities and was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., whose father was Frederick Law Olmsted, the famous landscape architect who helped design Central Park.

Ms. Saye called the nuisances section — which forbids “any brewery, distillery, malt house, slaughter house, brass foundry, tin, nail or other iron foundry, lime kiln or sugar bakery, tallow candlery, crematory, hospital, asylum” — antiquated.

7 Crazy Ideas Janet Yellen Did Not Mention, But Waiting in The Wings (June C.)

Hold interest rates down but simultaneously drive inflation up to as much as 5-6%. With real interest rates at negative 5%, borrowing will soar. What isn’t clear in this scenario is why lenders will want to lend, but this idea is supported by leading lights of the Harvard economics department, and let’s not let reality intrude.

Democrats Confront Vexing Politics Over the Health Care Law (jdargis)

Democrats could ultimately see some political benefit from the law. But in this midterm election, they are confronting a vexing reality: Many of those helped by the health care law — notably young people and minorities — are the least likely to cast votes that could preserve it, even though millions have gained health insurance and millions more will benefit from some of its popular provisions.

Listen To The Plants (jdargis)

When a caterpillar or a beetle starts chewing on a leaf, the plant responds by synthesizing its own defense chemicals in an attempt to drive away the insect. It also releases a chemical plume into the air, a message that can be intercepted by creatures nearby. Other plants respond to these alerts by producing their own chemical weapons, substances that repel leaf-eating insects. Predators that eat plant pests also detect the signals, using them like beacons to locate their prey.

Gallery: The Cost Of Coal (jdargis)

The April issue of National Geographic includes an article that asks "Can coal ever be clean?" (The answer is no, but at the right cost, it could be cleaner.) The article is accompanied by the photographs of Robb Kendrick, who has captured some of the costs of coal at sites around the world. National Geographic got in touch and offered to share some of these images with our readers; you can find these and more at the magazine's website.

Leveled by Landslide, Towns Mull How to Rebuild (jdargis)

A one-mile section of state highway crucial to life in this corner of the North Cascades, about 55 miles northeast of Seattle, lies shattered and buried, with pieces of the yellow divider line carved out and hurled up into the debris field. State engineers said this month in community meetings that they hoped to open a primitive one-lane detour within weeks, but that restoring even partial traffic on the old Route 530, portions of it under 20 feet of mud, was months away at the earliest.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 4/17/2014

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

7 Comments

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 3936
Just Awesome.

Apod

KennethPollinger's picture
KennethPollinger
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 22 2010
Posts: 653
Indications and Allocations
 
Indications And Allocations
 
A Wonderful (full of wonder) Easter to all.
 
 
In Death of Money, Jim Rickards, in the Conclusion of his book, after discussing three paths that the dollar will most likely take, (SDR=world money; some type of gold standard; social disorder) summarizes 7 mileposts, "indications and warnings," that we should be aware of in order to preserve WHATEVER wealth we have.
 
SEVEN SIGNS: (Indications and Warnings)
 
1. The price of gold. A rapid price rise/fall watch
 
2. Central Banks continue to acquire gold, especially China
 
3. IMF governance reforms.  Issuing SDR-denominated bonds
 
4. Regulatory reform failure.  Bank lobbyist's defeat the needed reforms.
 
5. System crashes.  Flash crashes, closure of market exchanges, etc.
 
6. End of QE and Abenomics.  Sustained reduction in US or Japanese asset purchases.
 
7. A Chinese collapse.  Financial disintegration by the wealth-management-product
       Ponzi scheme.
 
Page 298: " Not all of these seven signs may come to pass. The appearance of some signs may negate or delay others. They will not come in any particular order.
When any one sign does appear, investors should be alert to the specific consequences described (in the book) and the investment implications."
 
 
FIVE INVESTMENTS
 
% of INVESTABLE assets:
 
1, Gold. (20 %)  Whether inflation or deflation, gold preserves wealth.
 
2. Land. (20%)  Undeveloped land in prime locations or land with agricultural potential.
   
3. Fine art. (10%). Find pooled investment vehicles offering superb returns..
 
4. Alternative funds. (20%) Hedge funds and private equity funds, with specific strategies;  long-short equity, global macro, and hard assets with targeted natural resources, precious metals, water, or energy and transportation.
       Manager selection is critical and is much easier said than done..  The benefits
       of diversification and talented management outweigh the lack of liquidity.
 
5. Cash (30%).  Reduces overall portfolio volatility. An excellent deflation hedge and embedded optionality.  The challenge is being attentive to the indications and warnings and making a timely transition to one of the alternatives mentioned above.  Constant attention to the 7 signs above and a certain flexibility in outlook are required.
 
 
Easter comments by Ken.
 
 I presume that the EEE community is made up of people with a fair amount of assets.
All of Rickards suggestions are valuable to those of us fortunate enough to have saved some money for such diversification.  HOWEVER, how about half or more of the population who have hardly one year's retirement income?
Or who cannot find work or make even a "living wage," not to mention the meager minimum dollar amount
for many businesses? What can we say to them?  Buy a few silver coins?  Are these people doomed to suffer even
greater challenges, without even thinking of all the folks in the third world countries.  "The poor ye shall always have with you."  Have they had the time to read or hear The Crash Course? or, purchase and read The Death of Money? Probably not, and even if they did, what can they DO about it?
 
The best I can think of this Easter is to keep all these folks in our daily and especially Easter prayers, for spiritual fortitude in the next 2-3 years.         PLEASE see more below.  I'm still not good at posting.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
profile_mask2.png
 
 
 
 
Thoughts about the book, and some questions.
 
 
Obviously #s 1,2 and 5 are fairly easy to grasp.  However, 3 and 4 present many problems
 
.For example, how does one "find" the pooled investment vehicles and what is the minimum entry cost?  And how know which are the best in terms of safety and returns?
 
And re: Hedge funds and private equity funds??  There are thousands upon thousands, or hundreds upon hundreds in specific areas.  How discover the better ones, with the right management?  Financials are frequently misused, etc.
And if the market totally collapses or there is a 50% downturn, then can one get out in time?
 
Interestingly, Mish and Chris state, I believe, that they are into precious metals BIG TIME, not just 10-20% of investable assets, quite contrary to Rickards. I think I've heard them say 80-100%???  Not sure of this.
 
So what are the "indications or warnings" that Chris, Mish and others want?  Additions to Rickard's list?
 
Again, I cannot recommend Rickards book enough.  It will "blow your mind apart."  I'm actually surprised it was
allowed to be printed.  I'm sure it will be translated into the major Chinese language very quickly.
 
Any comments on all this??   What to do? THAT is the question?
 
Hope this is helpful somehow.   Ken

 

LesPhelps's picture
LesPhelps
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 30 2009
Posts: 728
The Cost of Coal

There are images that remind me of overpopulation.  The strip mine and rail yard pictures in this group do just that.  Other images that make overpopulation obvious to me are pictures of thousands of cars in a major city traffic jam, of flying over endless suburbs and industrial areas when approaching an airport.

I don't understand how people today can not know and talk about overpopulation.  I don't worry so much about AGW, but, are we massively changing this planet?  You bet we are.  Are we changing it for the better?  Only if you like concrete and asphalt better than forests and undeveloped land.

The major traffic jam pictures, mentioned above, also make me wonder how people can not know we are thoughtlessly consuming energy at a ludicrous rate.

KennethPollinger's picture
KennethPollinger
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 22 2010
Posts: 653
Les and Costa Rica

Les.  I totally agree.  When I travel to Costa Rica and live for for some time in the valleys, rivers, and mountains, and then return to N.Y., I could cry.  A quantitative and qualitative difference.

Another thought on Rickards's book.

It is NOT a 4 year college text at all, rather it is a GRADUATE course in Political Economy (the interface between Political Science and Economics).  Much is about China--a real eye-opener.   Can't recommend it enough!!! As an ex-college professor in sociology, political science and psychology, I hope I can be objective.

PLEASE read it, and pass it on to others--important.     Ken

thc0655's picture
thc0655
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 27 2010
Posts: 1513
"To whom much is given..."

Ken:

I share your concern for those who are in no position economically to prepare for the coming collapse in the ways Rickards wisely advocates. My personal hero and role model once said, "To whom much is given much will be required." In this context I take that to mean that those of use with the knowledge, financial resources, awareness of the coming collapse, critical thinking skills, etc (most of us here at PP) are responsible to our fellow travelers on this road to do whatever we can with whatever we have to warn them, provide for those we can, and do our best to alter our society's course to prevent this looming calamity. 

I am part of this virtual community here at PP because I find these are widely held values, attitudes and behaviors by Chris, Adam, you and most of the community here. And this is why I find it so despicably evil that our leaders (the "elites:" the wealthy, the powerful, TPTB) to whom much has been given all too often are simply using what they have to steal from everyone else to enrich and empower themselves even further rather than being "servant leaders" who lead us to care for each other and responsibly tend the Garden we have on loan temporarily from the Garden's owner.

It's all very discouraging and frightening, but at least my religious beliefs grant me the "satisfaction" of knowing there's a very hot place in hell reserved for those who live like that! 

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1982
Dear Ken

I will try to respond to your "Easter Comment" (quoted here for reference).

 I presume that the EEE community is made up of people with a fair amount of assets.
All of Rickards suggestions are valuable to those of us fortunate enough to have saved some money for such diversification.  HOWEVER, how about half or more of the population who have hardly one year's retirement income? Or who cannot find work or make even a "living wage," not to mention the meager minimum dollar amount for many businesses? What can we say to them?  Buy a few silver coins?  Are these people doomed to suffer even greater challenges, without even thinking of all the folks in the third world countries.  "The poor ye shall always have with you."  Have they had the time to read or hear The Crash Course? or, purchase and read The Death of Money? Probably not, and even if they did, what can they DO about it?
You're correct. Here at PP, a fair number of us fall into the "non-accredited investor" category, and some are at the "barely making it" level. I'm in the former, and surrounded by both. The only reason my husband and I are in decent shape financially is that we eschewed debt and lived below our means in case of things outside our budget. Entropy happens: you have to allow for it. We could live on our retirement income for our projected lifetime on our savings, not like kings, but not on subsistence, either.
 
But we made it a priority to get to know our neighbors (see the old Community Building forum thread) for two reasons. Reason # 1 was to help those who would need it, and maybe find others to help neighbors as well. You cannot help everyone. In a crash your sphere of influence will be severely limited to those nearby. The main things I have stockpiled are seeds, and expertise. No one is really listening, though, not yet. The shopping mall  this week was full of people buying fancy clothes for Easter. Probably on credit. *sigh*
 
The other reason is to know who the bad apples in your neighborhood might be, in case of unrest, and whop the potential allies might be. Again, sphere of influence.
 
Bottom line, know your neighbors. Help who you can when the time comes.
KennethPollinger's picture
KennethPollinger
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 22 2010
Posts: 653
Spiritual Resiliency

In light of some of the comments today, I WONDER if this should be another major category for PP.com???

I realize it might be fraught with danger as it can be easily tied up with religion and its discontents, and prejudices.  But, maybe, just maybe, we could use such a category.

I offer the following as an example of such an endeavor.   Ken

 

 

Ken PollingerAwareness Centers
Nyack, New York ~ The Catskills, New York ~ Lagunas, Costa Rica

www.AwarenessCenters.com ~ [email protected]

 

Dan and Sam Harris have a conversation--excellent interview.  
 

Enjoy, Zen

 

taming2.jpg

Taming the Mind: A Conversation with Dan Harris

 

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments