Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 1/24 - AK and WA Fish Tested For Radiation, The Arctic Apple

Friday, January 24, 2014, 9:53 AM

Economy

Developer finds Chrome eavesdropping bug (westcoastjan)

Typically, people must manually grant permission to each site that wants to access a computer's microphone to listen in. Once permission has been granted Chrome lets people know a site is listening via a blinking red dot on the tab for that site.

In a video accompanying the blogpost, Mr Ater showed how a malicious attacker could use specially crafted code to exploit these permissions to launch a "pop-under" window that starts the speech recognition system.

Is This the Beginning of the End for the Dollar? (Taki T.)

Comments from state-backed Xinhua that call for a “de-Americanized world” and a proposal to consider a new international reserve currency to replace the dollar mark a key event for gold prices. While the Chinese echoed the notion of a “super-sovereign reserve currency” before, their recent statement may have more sticking power as the U.S. struggles to reach agreements on debt ceiling talks and monetary policy actions.

Hospital Chain Said to Scheme to Inflate Bills (jdargis)

This month, the Justice Department said it had joined eight separate whistle-blower lawsuits against H.M.A. in six states. The lawsuits describe a wide-ranging strategy that is said to have relied on a mix of sophisticated software systems, financial incentives and threats in an attempt to inflate the company’s payments from Medicare and Medicaid by admitting patients like an infant whose temperature was a normal 98.7 degrees for a “fever.”

The Arctic Apple (jdargis)

“We don’t see that there’s any flaw in the technology as far as a safety issue,” Wendy Brannen, USApple’s director of consumer health and public relations, reiterated in a phone interview. What does concern her is how the public will react.

Biodiversity can flourish on an urban planet (jdargis)

On a crowded planet, protecting species in their natural habitat is proving increasingly difficult. Humans continue to expand their networks of cities, towns, and farms worldwide. By 2030, cities are expected to occupy three times as much land as they did in 2010. Remaining natural habitats are now often a fragment caught in this global web of cities connected by transportation networks. With the number of species that are going extinct on the rise, it's necessary to consider the potential of urban environments to serve as refuges for the survivors.

Industry Awakens to Threat of Climate Change (jdargis)

Coke reflects a growing view among American business leaders and mainstream economists who see global warming as a force that contributes to lower gross domestic products, higher food and commodity costs, broken supply chains and increased financial risk. Their position is at striking odds with the longstanding argument, advanced by the coal industry and others, that policies to curb carbon emissions are more economically harmful than the impact of climate change.

All Eyes on Implementation of Mexican Oil Reform (James B.)

Mexico’s Congress is debating and drafting secondary laws to implement a sweeping energy reform bill passed last month that will open up the market to international oil and gas companies. Congress is expected to issue a draft and negotiate secondary legislation within 120 days, but there remains some ambiguity as to when bidding rounds would actually be opened up to international oil companies, with most predicting sometime next year.

Alaska & Washington Salmon Tested For Radiation (Thetallestmanonearth)

What Loki Fish found in their testing was out of seven samples, five were below the level of detection and two had low levels of cesium. One sample had cesium 134, a marker that confirms at least that contamination came from Fukushima Daiichi due to the short half life.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 1/23/14

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

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2 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 4061
cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 7 2007
Posts: 5568
Fish tested for radiation

In the above article, whoever ordered the testing did not do it right, and I'm kind of surprised by that, because at least the testing lab should have told them that I-131 has an 8-day half life and there's really no point testing for it because it's not going to be there.

So that was a waste.

And just as odd they did not test for strontium-90, which is the more worrisome of all the radionuclides because of its tendency to bio-accumulate.  The cesium isotopes all tend to be excreted rather easily, but not strontium.

I'm not suggesting that I think think they would have found anything of concern if they had tested for strontium-90; in fact, I'm pretty sure they wouldn't have.  But I do want to point out that if you are going to pay for expensive tests to allay concerns, you should at least run the right ones.

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