Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 5/24 - Scandals And Economic Disasters, Toxic Rice Causes Concern In China

Friday, May 24, 2013, 10:47 AM

Economy

Elizabeth Warren Grills Treasury Secretary on Too Big to Fail (Thomas C.)

"Let me try the question a different way," Warren persisted. "How big do the biggest banks have to get before we consider breaking them up?" she asked, adding that the largest American banks are 30 percent larger than they were five years ago. "Do they have to double in size? Triple in size? Quadruple in size? Before we talk about breaking up the biggest financial institutions?"

Thanks To QE Bernanke Has Injected Foreign Banks With Over $1 Trillion In Cash For First Time Ever (nimsdf)

So it was our expectation that while if not slowing down its rate of money-creation (i.e., reserve-production) - something that won't happen for a long time as it would crash the stock market - the Fed's reserves would at least revert to being accumulated at US-based banks. No such luck. In fact as the latest H.8 report demonstrates, as of the most recently weekly data, the Fed's policies have led to foreign banks operating in the US holding an all time high amount of reserves, surpassing $1 trillion for the first time, or $1,033 billion to be precise.

Hyperinflation – 10 Worst Cases (westcoastjan)

In just the one month of January 1994 inflation rose by 313 million %. Prices doubled every 34 hours (which is nothing compared to Hungary). The currency ended up getting revalued 5 times in all between 1993 and 1995, all to no avail. The cause? A recession triggered by overseas borrowing and an on-going political struggle in the 1980s and the following decade.

1/3 of Canadians live paycheque to paycheque, survey suggests (westcoastjan)

Meanwhile, two-thirds of households with no wealth accumulation — meaning the value of their assets was less or about the same as the amount of their household debt — didn't expect to get any further ahead in the next three years, the study said.

Scandals & Economic Disasters (GE Christenson)

There is no shortage of scandals in Washington DC, New York, and London; and, there is an excess of monetary heroin, Quantitative Easing, in Europe, the UK, Japan, the USA, and elsewhere. (When will they ever learn?)

The S&P 500 is hitting new highs, and gold and silver are sitting roughly at two-year lows. Strange and stranger every day…

What should we make of it? Let’s ask the really intelligent old guys who have seen it all.

Greek Prostitution Soars By 150% As Youth Unempoyment Hits 75% In Some Areas (Nervous Nelly)


“Five euros only, just 5 euros,” whispered Maria, a young prostitute with sunken cheeks and bedraggled hair, as she pitched herself forward from the shadows of a graffiti-riddled alley in central Athens on a recent weeknight.

Many prostitutes have been selling their services for as little as 10 to 15 euros, a price that has shrunk along with the income of clients afflicted by the crisis. Many more prostitutes are taking greater health risks by having unprotected sex, which sells for a premium. Still more are subject to violence and rape.

Venezuela aims to end toilet paper shortage (westcoastjan)

"Price controls, for example, act as a disincentive to local producers, forcing them to cut output," says the survey organisation Consensus Economics.

"The resulting scarcity forces up inflation, defeating the entire purpose of price controls in the first place."

Will It Be Inflation Or Deflation? The Answer May Surprise You (pinecarr)

he rate at which money circulates in our economy is the lowest that it has been in more than 50 years. It has been steadily falling since the late 1990s, and this is a clear sign that economic activity is slowing down. The shaded areas in the chart represent recessions, and as you can see, the velocity of money always slows down during a recession. But even though the government is telling us that we are not in a recession right now, the velocity of money continues to drop like a rock. This is one of the factors that is putting a tremendous amount of deflationary pressure on our economy...

Harvard Economist: 'The Crisis Isn't Over in the US or Europe' (Regina F.)

The technical term for this is financial repression. After World War II, all countries that had a big debt overhang relied on financial repression to avoid an explicit default. After the war, governments imposed interest rate ceilings for government bonds. Nowadays they have more sophisticated means.

Stockholm riots throw spotlight on Swedish inequality (westcoastjan)

Despite the assertion, some local people said the police had been heavy-handed and there is clearly much anger at the shooting dead by police of an elderly man wielding a knife 10 days ago.

Tax avoidance: Developing countries take on multinationals (westcoastjan)

A new law in Zambia, which comes into force this month, requires mining companies to bring the proceeds of export sales back to Zambia. Once in Zambia, the country's tax authorities will scrutinise dividends and other payments to see if they are justified before they leave the country.

Straw bale homes for LILAC co-housing residents (westcoastjan)

Their scheme has been hailed as pioneering, not just because of its eco-friendly ethos but because of the way it is financed and the fact that it is also based around the Danish co-housing model.

Toxic Rice Causes Concern In China (westcoastjan)

A number of rice mills in the Chinese province of Hunan have been been closed down after dangerous levels of cadmium were found in samples, according to reports,

Meanwhile, some rice products have been recalled and others impounded.

Siblings' Victoria company boosts shellfish sector with algae-producing reactor (westcoastjan)

The original concept was to establish technology to breed aquarium fish before the company switched to the recycling system and eventually evolved into the algae production business.

Robert said algae production was part of the fish breeding concept.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the Gold & Silver Digest: 5/23/13

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

4 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 4167
Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 3936
Schlock Horror.

"Teenage girl yells racial abuse at football player"

This has been the Main Steam Media's lead story for the past three days. The lead story should be:

Editors in Government conspiracy to keep population in Dark

Thank goodness for this site and the internet. So far not a peep about the Rossi confirmation.

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 3936
Right on Cue.

It's 1.7 miles long. Its surface is covered in a sticky black substance similar to the gunk at the bottom of a barbecue. If it impacted Earth it would probably result in global extinction. Good thing it is just making a flyby.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-dark-massive-asteroid-earth.html#jCp

Right there is reason # 46 for ensuring that we colonise the L's.

 

Hladini's picture
Hladini
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 28 2011
Posts: 83
Sex as Currency

Reading the article in Zero Hedge about the rising rates of prostitution in Greece is very sad.  The article highlighted that women are trading sex for very low wages: 5 euros.  I had a law school professor who lived through Nazi Germany as a young attorney.  He told me that towards the end of the war, sex was actually a form of currency.

Similarly, I recently read an interview with a Bosnian survivor who commented that women would trade sex for a canned good.  He went on to comment that people who had better chances of survival were those who could "fix things" or "fix people."  Almost all exchange was by barter or theft.

In war-torn Bosnia, the most valuable assets were guns and ammo.

Not a pretty picture.

 

 

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