Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 10/29 - Americans Saving Less To Sustain Spending, Shale Oil Becomes Shale Fail

Monday, October 29, 2018, 9:58 AM

Economy

Americans Save Less to Sustain Spending as Income Gains Cool (Adam)

Risks to the outlook include President Donald Trump’s global trade war -- which is boosting prices and making some companies hesitant to invest -- as well as a stock-market swoon and a fading of the effects from fiscal stimulus. At the same time, consumer optimism remains elevated amid a tight labor market and lower taxes, providing support for spending in the final quarter.

As the housing market stagnates, American homeowners are staying put for the longest stretches ever (Adam)

Across the country, homes that sold in the third quarter of this year had been owned an average of 8.23 years, according to an analysis from Attom Data Solutions. That’s almost double the length of time a home sold in 2000, when Attom’s data begin, had been owned.

It’s partly the long tail of the housing crisis that’s created stagnant conditions and a less dynamic housing market, Attom spokesman Daren Blomquist told MarketWatch.

About the Kind of People Who Believe in Conspiracy Theories (edelinski)

Most blame the conspiracy mentality on a sense of profound lack of control in their lives, whether due to randomness or the machinations of others. In one study, research participants who were asked to remember instances over which they had no control, such as the weather, were more likely to accept a conspiracy theory than those who were asked to remember instances in which they do have control (eg what they wear or eat). In a similar vein, survey respondents who faced working conditions with reduced levels of control (eg long-term unemployment, temporary employment) expressed greater levels of a conspiracy mentality than those who had more control (eg permanent employment). The rationale behind this is that lacking control increases the need to engage in the compensatory illusion of control – that is, in conspiracy theories. Detecting patterns where there are, in fact, none at least leaves open the possibility of gaining control, whereas the attribution of, say, a natural disaster to unchangeable and uncontrollable weather dynamics does not.

Empire Of Illusion (Don R.)

Chris Hedges on Empire of Illusion

Stagflation or Price Stability (Wilson S.)

Due to the financial sector interrupting the flow of money supply to the economy, monetary policy has lagged impact on real economic activities. Enormous monetary expansion (printing money aka QE) following the global financial crisis (GFC) has inflated asset prices of all types, because the financial sector has acted as a liquidity trap, retaining the money for financial speculation. Money supply has not flowed smoothly to the real economy, only in fits and starts, leading to alternate periods of sluggish and vigorous inflation in producer and consumer prices.

Midterms 2018: Voting machines are changing Texas voters’ ballots, state officials admit (Paul D.)

“The Hart eSlate machines are not malfunctioning,” said Sam Taylor, spokesman for the office of Secretary of State, according to the Press Association news agency. “The problems being reported are a result of user error – usually voters hitting a button or using the selection wheel before the screen is finished rendering.”

The Hart eSlate machines in question are used in 30 per cent of Texas counties, including the state’s largest, Harris, which includes the city of Houston.

Number of Georgia Voters Purged by Brian Kemp Continues to Climb (Paul D.)

After he received the list, Palast said he analyzed it and discovered that 340,134 voters were purged when they shouldn’t have been. To do this, he consulted experts who cross-referenced voter data with a number of other databases including cell phone bills and tax filings to see if, in fact, any of these voters had actually moved. Many had not. A list of the purged voters’ names is available on Palast’s website. While it is too late for them to register for the upcoming midterm elections, they are still eligible to re-register for the 2020 presidential election.

Raconteur Report: Well, That's A Problem... (thc0655)

So this has officially gone around the bend, and violence in the region has made that worse.

This is now probably going to skyrocket presently, because it's going to keep spreading exposure faster than they can contain it and vaccinate around it, not least of which because they had over 40 burials that were not done properly, which exposes family members to the virus from contaminated corpses.

Shale oil becomes shale fail (and a nice subsidy for consumers) (Paul D.)

Only nine of 33 shale oil exploration and production companies reviewed in the report cited above had positive free cash flow for the first half of 2018. This is even though prices had risen all the way from a low of around $30 in 2016 to the mid-$70 range by the middle of this year.

Why India Wants to Turn its Beaches into Nuclear Fuel (Sparky1)

The country has long been eager to exploit its estimated 300,000 to 850,000 tonnes of thorium – quite probably the world’s largest reserves – but progress has been slow. Their effort is coming back into focus amid renewed interest in the technology. Last year Dutch scientists fired up the first new experimental thorium reactor in decades, start-ups are promoting the technology in the West and last year China pledged to spend $3.3bn to develop reactors that could eventually run on thorium.

We Need to Completely Change Agriculture to Adapt to Climate Change (Paul D.)

One solution is to eat less meat, says a new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a group of climate scientists working for the United Nations. But while that would obviously help us lower emissions, the researchers admit, isn’t realistic. “A complete shift to a vegetarian diet where protein comes from leguminous crops, global agriculture would need 80 million [hectacre] more arable land and 360 million [hectacre] less pasture land to feed the world’s 2050 population,” the study reads.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 10/26/18

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

31 Comments

DennisC's picture
DennisC
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Posts: 336
Your Tax Dollars at Work (a.k.a. the gift that keeps on giving)

Who needs "foreign" agents when .gov employees are seemingly just as effective.  Must need more projects at this agency (or less .gov employees).  Now, there's a radical idea, IMO.

https://www.nextgov.com/cio-briefing/2018/10/porn-watching-employee-infe...

An Interior Department watchdog recommended the U.S. Geological Survey ratchet up internet security protocols after discovering its networks had been infected with malware from pornography sites.

The agency’s inspector general traced the malicious software to a single unnamed USGS employee, who reportedly used a government-issued computer to visit some 9,000 adult video sites, according to a report published Oct. 17.

Many of the prohibited pages were linked to Russian websites containing malware, which was ultimately downloaded to the employee’s computer and used to infiltrate USGS networks, auditors found. The investigation found the employee saved much of the pornographic material on an unauthorized USB drive and personal Android cellphone, both of which were connected to their computer against agency protocols.

The employee’s cell phone was also infected with malware.

Oh, BTW, don't forget that your final estimated tax payment for 2018 is due in January (and donations are gladly accepted any time of the year).

 

Helix's picture
Helix
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Posts: 82
I laud Caroline Haskins'

I laud Caroline Haskins' article "We Need to Completely Change Agriculture to Adapt to Climate Change" for focusing on the role of agriculture is climate change, but I think there are a few points that should be challenged or elaborated on.  Among these are:

  • The "ideal human diet" is far from a settled issue.  While it is true that the western diet is probably too rich in sugars, refined carbohydrates, fats, and animal proteins, different researchers have arived at wildly different conclusions.  One thing that is pretty clear, though, is that different individuals have different tastes and nutritional needs, so we can talk about diets in broad terms, but that's about it.  Caroline Haskins does mention this, but...
  • The IPCC paper chose the HHEP as its dietary guideline.  While this is a well-respected guideline, it should be pointed out that it's recommendations concerning the nutritional components mentioned in the first bullet above are far below those of many other studies.  Using this guideline therefore tends to accentuate the claims made in the IPCC report.  To its credit, the IPCC was quite clear about its methodology, but this vital point did not make it into Caroline Haskins' article.
  • A lot has been said about the potency methane as a greenhouse gas of late.  While it is true that methane is far more potent than carbon dioxide, it breaks down in the atmospehere.  (Think about how readily it burns.)  The half-life is about seven years, so after seven years, and assuming livestock production to be constant, we reach a steady state.  So, yes, methane from livestock production is an issue, and we probably consume too much animal protein, but do "We Need to Completely Change Agriculture" because of this?  A better question to ask is what land is most appropriate for vegetative food production and how can livestock production be feasibly redirected to less arable land, and what production methods (for example, mob-stocking) are most suitable for the land so used.  This is a complex issue, involving access to water, distance to markets, existing ifrastructure, and farmer/rancher education.
  • My biggest quibble is a sin of omission.  It's alluded to in the picture at the top of the article, but is never actually discussed.  The picture shows uncovered, dessicated soil from which nearly all organic content has been lost by constantly exposing it to the atmosphere.  Once exposed, organic matter is subject to oxidation.  Over time, this has released gigantic amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, to the extent that agricultural soils in North America have lost on average more than 80% of their carbon.  The single most important contribution agriculture can make to combat climate change is to reverse this process -- sequester more carbon in the form of organic matter in the soil.  Doing so would not only remove carbon dioxide from the air, but it would also improve soil tilth, enhance water retention (thus reducing water requirements and irrigation), and reduce the need for chemical fertilizers (whose production, delivery, and application also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions).  Note this has nothing at all to do with livestock production.  Note also that -this- is what would require truly drastic changes in agricultural practices, particularly in the production of grains, oil crops, and cotton.

Kudos to Caroline Haskins for opening up this discussion.  It's a discussion we need to continue, followed by getting our hands dirty.

ezlxq1949's picture
ezlxq1949
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Methane -> carbon dioxide

Helix wrote:

While it is true that methane is far more potent than carbon dioxide, it breaks down in the atmospehere.  (Think about how readily it burns.)

Yes, and yields yet more CO2

CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O (ΔH = −891 kJ/mol, at standard conditions)

WIkipedia

Uncletommy's picture
Uncletommy
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Posts: 623
An omnivore's dilemma?

With all due respect to Caroline Haskins, when you boil things down to the basics, humans eat what they can get their hands on; they adapt to environmental conditions or adapt the environment to meet their needs. However, as long as there is cheap fossil fuel energy to convert into food calories, the problem will come down to population. Some are going to win and a lot more are going to lose. Our ingenuity has gotten use to this point. Perhaps we will be able to convert thorium into food

The ideal diet is what can be obtained locally or what can be acquired economically from nearby sources. As long as we assume that lemons from South Africa or grapes from the Napa Valley or rice from Vietnam are standard fixtures in a globalized world, then the crunch will only come when someone shuts off the tap. This applies to both water and oil.

Changing how we farm is a pipe dream to the average Joe. Be prepared and prepare your children to "get their hands dirty". A grocery cell phone ordering app ain't gonna cut it!

thc0655's picture
thc0655
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Interesting times in Georgia

http://fmshooter.com/ap-claims-of-georgia-voter-suppression/

In a startling Twitter thread by Erick Erickson of The Resurgentmassive voter fraud has been ousted and exposed in Georgia. A review by the Secretary of State (and even an independent investigator) set a massive lie straight about “pending” voters filed by Democrat Stacey Abrams.

As detailed by Erickson, the Associated Press ran a story on October 9th concerning “pending” voters, claiming that 53,000 people had been placed on a “pending voter” file in Georgia because of “exact match” law. “Exact match” requires voters to match their drivers license to their voter registration information.

In the story published by the Associated Press, hyphenated or changed last names were called out as an issue of voter suppression (among other things) by Stacey Abrams, the Democrat candidate for governorship of Georgia.  

Abrams asserted that Republican rival Brian Kemp attempted to suppress minority and women voters via the supposed 53,000 “pending” voters.

The AP also interviewed a woman named Marsha Appling-Nunez and claimed she was a “pending” voter.

Instead, Appling-Nunez is an active voter and can vote on November 6th, despite the AP’s misleading report.

As broken down by Erickson:

There are not 53,000 pending voters. There are just over 75,000 voters. Here’s how they break down.

9,224 are ‘pending’ because the person is 17.5.

2,935 used a fake address.

3,393 are ‘pending’ because citizenship could not be verified.

5,842 are ‘pending’ because they match another active voter file.

After you remove underage, fake addresses, duplicates, and non-citizens, you have roughly 46,000 ‘pending’ on the list.

75% are on the list because they failed Social Security Number verification, a process put in place under the Obama Administration.

On top of that, 23% of the staggering 75% of failed SSN verifications were submitted by the New Georgia Project, a non-profit set up leftist Stacey Abrams, and have been pending since 2014. 

 

Helix's picture
Helix
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Re CH4 -> CO2
ezlxq1949 wrote:

Yes, and yields yet more CO2

CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O (ΔH = −891 kJ/mol, at standard conditions)

What you say is true.  This is yet another pathway by which CO2 is released into the atmosphere.  However, the source of the carbon released by the livestock is plant matter, which was produced by plant respiration of CO2 from the atmosphere.  So this CO2 is something of a wash, assuming no loss of soil organic matter in the process.

My point was that although CH4 is a more potent greenhouse gas than is CO2, its effect on climate change is limited to some extent by virtue of it being oxidized over time.  This is a very different scenario than losing organic matter from the soil, clearing forests, or burning fossil fuels, which in effect transfer carbon from sequestered reservoirs and move it into the atmosphere in the form of CO2.

Bleep's picture
Bleep
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Conspiracy Theories

I really appreciate the article on the kind of people who believe in conspiracy theories.   One might predict with a big or event where we have litle impact that there would be a significant greater number of conspiracy theories.  That seems to be the case.  This raises the importance to me of doing things that I have some control over: gardening, yard work, pet training, nature walks so I can orient and connect to my immediate surroundings.  

Also raises the question as to whether specific personality types and traits are more prone to conspiracy.

 

 

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
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Conspiracy Theory Theory -- The Redirection Trick

The trick here is to turn the attention away from the event itself to the (defective) psychological structure of a person who doubts the official story.

It is a normal human characteristic to assume that people with very differnent viewpoints are both wrong, and, that there is something wrong with them.

Rather than carefully evaluating the physical situation and the strength of its supporting evidence, lets redirect attention to the psychological defects of those who disagree.

What is WRONG with YOUR MIND that you doubt that Iraq's has WMDs?

Why do you doubt that 2 planes can knock down 3 buildings?   Perhaps you have lost a job recently and are under a great deal of stress?  Would a support group or a kindly psychotherapist to talk to help you accept that this is perfectly normal?  Perhaps a small dose of medication might help?  Would you be willing to try that?  I am only trying to help you because I care.

davefairtex's picture
davefairtex
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the VW diesel emissions conspiracy

What was amusing about the article is that it postulated a fake German company in cahoots with the German government to cover up a flaw in a product.

Of course, anyone imagining that Volkswagen would deliberately engineer a flaw in the diesel emissions of its vehicles - with one program that ran during emissions testing, and a very different program that ran during driving - would also be labeled a conspiracy theorist too.

How many other, undiscovered conspiracies are floating around out there?  Do we imagine they've all been uncovered after this Volkswagen scandal was exposed?

Let's face it, when money is involved, companies engage in conspiracies.  That's just reality.  Same thing happens when leaders of nations want to go to war, but their people are reluctant.  They engage in conspiracies also.  Mostly, when those conspiracies are exposed, it nets a big ho-hum from the public.

Perhaps a willingness to see conspiracies is simply reflective of people who have a functioning memory.  "Hey wait a minute...I thought you guys said there were WMD in Iraq..."

Bang.  Everyone with a functioning memory takes one step further into being a "Conspiracy Theorist."

Its also reflective of a collapse of confidence in government.  And business.  And media.  And the sickcare cartel.  And the defense industry.  And the agro-poison manufacturers.  And ...  and...

A collapse in confidence in the story of the status quo.

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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I see it the other way
sand_puppy wrote:

The trick here is to turn the attention away from the event itself to the (defective) psychological structure of a person who doubts the official story.

It is a normal human characteristic to assume that people with very differnent viewpoints are both wrong, and, that there is something wrong with them.

Rather than carefully evaluating the physical situation and the strength of its supporting evidence, lets redirect attention to the psychological defects of those who disagree.

What is WRONG with YOUR MIND that you doubt that Iraq's has WMDs?

Why do you doubt that 2 planes can knock down 3 buildings?   Perhaps you have lost a job recently and are under a great deal of stress?  Would a support group or a kindly psychotherapist to talk to help you accept that this is perfectly normal?  Perhaps a small dose of medication might help?  Would you be willing to try that?  I am only trying to help you because I care.

I have a functioning memory and I can smell BS a mile away.  It's like a super-power of mine.  

Accordingly, I consider that the people who write such articles and hold the view that anybody who suspects they are not being told the full story by conflicted, self-interested parties, especially the government, that they themselves are the ones with a "defect" of some sort.

That might be a conflicting belief system they have not yet uncovered and looked at, a profound lack of curiosity, a poor memory, or maybe the inability to form complex thought patterns where deduction is the main thread that guides the path.

The problem with the cited article is that it presumes there's "something wrong" with people who deviate from the cultural Overton window on big events.  I can imagine that these folks would consider someone mentally defective on day 1 but then on day 2 when "the big thing" was revealed to have actually been a conspiracy, drop the 'diagnosis' like it never happened, just skip right past their prior error and somehow fail to observe that it was they who had it wrong all along.

Conspiracies happen every day.  It's just how the world works.  It's how humans are wired.  They happen in marriages when spouses cheat, they happen in corporations that do their best (and worst) to win market share, and  Wells Fargo is probably running a dozen right now.

So I really do think that people who are allergic to conspiracy thinking and try to turn that into a psychological defect are no different really than the Soviet Era psychiatrists that labelled people who opposed the system mentally incapacitated and had them committed.

But make no mistake, we are well on the way to having ideas labelled as "dangerous."  To the persons involved in this aritcle,  the writer and the sources, seem to be convinced that there's a dangerous thing floating around called "conspiracy ideation" that has the power to lead people astray and destroy their minds.

They seem unaware that yesterday's conspiracies more often than not turn out to be today's conspiracy fact.  What sort of science fails to notice that it's core theory is rejected repeatedly by reality?  Not a sound one, that's for sure.

I'll end with this; George Lakoff is a cognitive linguist and author of some very influential books, especially for the left.  "Don't think of an elephant" is one example "Moral Politics" is another.  They are both quite good and shaped my thinking.  

Here's what he's thinking now, with a response by Ben Hunt atop:

I agree with Ben 100%.

I cannot believe that people even think the way that Lakoff is thinking, but there you have it.  It's a very short hop, skip and a tiny jump to banning this website and the Crash Course because the ideas contained therein are "more harmful than a fist" because they might disturb people from afar.

George is also confusing "freedom" with "lack of emotional reactions" which is a really bizarre thing coming from such a careful academic and philosopher.  I'd think Socrates would have boxed his ears for that tweet and sent him to the back of the student section.

At any rate, I see the article linked as within the spectrum of moving towards banning uncomfortable ideas with the  definition of "uncomfortable" seeming to be "anything that would cause emotional reactions in people trying to hide embarrassing stuff from the public."

The attempt to lump everyone who questions authority into a single bucket as "conspiracy theorists" without regard for the wide spectrum of people who question things really says more about the the people doing the lumping than the people being lumped.  

So I see it the other way; rather than being illuminated about so-called conspiracy theorists I came away with sense that the people fretting about this are themselves the ones with an unworkably rigid world-view in a time of great stress and change.  I feel badly for them.  They have a rough future coming their way.

thc0655's picture
thc0655
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What’s the plan in case PP.com is deplatformed?

Do you have a plan in case PP.com gets the Alex Jones or Gab treatment from the Cloud People in Silicon Valley? What’s our first rendezvous point and second rendezvous point? I have your web address and may be able to find you that way, but I’m no computer whizz and I’m not on social media at all. I need all the help I can get if clicking once doesn’t work.

The bad news is that we haven’t been disruptive enough to Business As Usual to get banned yet. That’s also the good news. However I’m convinced our day is drawing closer all the time.

”Welcome to the Hunger Games. And may the odds be ever in your favor.”

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Adam Taggart
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ResilientLife.com

Good question, THC.

We own the url ResilientLife.com, so we'll attempt to serve the site from there if the PP.com domain ever gets shut down.

We also still own ChrisMartenson.com, and will use that as a backup if ResilientLife.com similarly were to get compromised.

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Bleep
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Enjoying the conspiracy discussion

I am enjoying this discussion. It is helping me to illuminate some of my own presuppositions.  

Still a big believer in the here and now.  Our beloved cat (Nuunuu) was attacked by another animal, not sure what (conspiracy of rats - she is pretty good at controlling the rodent population around here and they, no doubt, would love to even the score) last night and I am tending to her needs.  Nothing like hurt loved ones to bring you back to what is really important.  Overjoyed that my wife is coming back around lunchtime from visiting her family in China after being away 7 long weeks.  smiley

 

Rob

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sand_puppy
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PP Ham Radio Network

I would like to suggest a Ham Radio Network and with a 10 minute daily broadcast and a weekly off the cuff or essay.

One PP member suggested this little baby with a long antenna.  This could be combined with a couple of nodes in the network to repeat the broadcast.  (Say, Chris' house on the east coast and Adam's house on the west coast?)

The rest of us could get smaller units that receive well but don't broadcast with nearly as much power.  (These smaller units could also be used to communicate with family and neighbors locally.)

A chain of members could transmit local information to Chris and Adam, our information consolidators, via a series of short member-to-member hops.

As long as someone else owns the communication venue (website, server farm, the ISP) a group is vulnerable to being shut down by censors.  Controlling the narative is the goal.

Of course, the government "regulates" the airwaves too, and a post-collapse ham radio information network might be actively hunted and supressed.  You might have to broadcast from a different location each time, etc.

Edwardelinski's picture
Edwardelinski
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Fascinating Responses Bleep

Instead of looking for an explanation for the hideous events of last week from a political or mainstream point of view I instead wondered where Science and Psychology might weigh in.So, I went searching and the possible answers were vast.The article submitted here was what I considered to be the most neutral and safe, not to offend other readers.I was looking fo an ordinary persons point of view and thoughts...Read them,the reactions, also provide insight...  

newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
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Marijuana Induced Paranoia

This may help: https://www.dualdiagnosis.org/marijuana-abuse/marijuana-paranoia/

Dude, go down to the bar or like surfing or something. Seriously, connect in real-time with real live people. Any square dances in you neck of the woods. It's the Fall harvest season. Get out there to the festivals.

"Be cheerful while you are alive."  -- Ptah-Hotep, 24th Century B.C.

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is often difficult to
verify their authenticity." --Abraham Lincoln

newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
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Oh Come On!

The framwork IS the message!

Are you guys seriously identifying yourselves with the likes of Alex Jones being ban by a private corporation from THEIR product?

Are you saying that private corporations can't do what they want with their property?

Have you'all fall'n into the Facebook apocolypse?

Or do you not really understand what makes the internet work? *(human programmers) it's not a utility. Unless we make is so. Can you sayChattenooga?

I'm seriously getting worried folks are going insular.

BTW: when and where will the PP Square Dance and Hoo'nanny be held?

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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Important Context
newsbuoy wrote:

The framwork IS the message!

Are you guys seriously identifying yourselves with the likes of Alex Jones being ban by a private corporation from THEIR product?

Are you saying that private corporations can't do what they want with their property?

Have you'all fall'n into the Facebook apocolypse?

Or do you not really understand what makes the internet work? *(human programmers) it's not a utility. Unless we make is so. Can you sayChattenooga?

I'm seriously getting worried folks are going insular.

BTW: when and where will the PP Square Dance and Hoo'nanny be held?

This article by Tom Luongo captures my thinking on the matter quite nicely.

Please read and then we can discuss.

https://tomluongo.me/2018/10/29/attack-on-gab-proves-speech-was-never-free/

The slippery slope I see all of us on includes the idea that maybe what I wrote above could be perceived by the "personhood" of Wells Fargo as "hateful."  Then WF goes to our hosting provider who they possibly provide banking and loan services for.  The hosting provider then has to choose between having its funding immediately cut off or dropping PP.com by later tonight.

Or maybe it's the Department of Energy who takes exception to our critiques of shale as being "harmful/hateful to national security" and runs a request over to Treasury which then decides to lean on our payment processor.  

See where this is going?

By immediately conflating this line of inquiry with self-identifying with Alex Jones skips a whole lot of intermediate territory, wouldn't you agree?

Also, I did not follow the MJ-paranoia you were trying to make.  Can you be more direct?

skipr's picture
skipr
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keep me updated

Hey SP,   I was thinking about the same thing.  Unfortunately I know very little about them.  I intend to get into it once I relocate to a relatively sane area.  I wonder if we could recruit Dmitry Orlov to be the central communication node since he's always floating around on his houseboat.

Since they have been around for awhile are they analog devices, or have they migrated over to a digital signal?  If it's digital, could the transmission be encrypted?

davefairtex's picture
davefairtex
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Posts: 5657
hate speech

I have no problem with making hate speech illegal, under one condition: I'm the only one who gets to define hate speech, because by definition, I'm a reasonable person.

And that's always the problem.  Who watches the watchers?

To clarify my first statement: I believe that, in America, under no circumstances should we make hate speech illegal because I don't trust ANY American to properly define what hate speech actually is.  And I REALLY don't trust his or her successor.

Twitter banning hate speech?  Facebook banning hate speech?  Google banning hate speech?  If these companies are acting as a de facto public square, then they should be subject to the US Constitution.  Sounds like a great case for our 9 supremes to look at.

Where's the ACLU when you need them?  They used to defend the rights of Nazis to march.  Let's get Dershowitz involved.  The man has an amazing grip on principle.  He clearly does not like Trump, and yet is working hard to defend him because he thinks that's the moral position.

Charles Hugh Smith made the list of "Russian Propaganda Sources".  He's definitely on a "subversives" list.  He's only subversive because he isn't toeing the corporate party line.  In the 60s that used to give you street cred.  Now that sort of thing just makes you discredited as a "conspiracy theorist" or a "Russian Propaganda Site."

Ultimately I fall back on this:

First they came for the Nazis.  But I was not a Nazi, so I said nothing.

Then they came for Alex Jones.  But I was not Alex Jones, so I said nothing.

Then they came for Peak Prosperity...oh crap...

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sand_puppy
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Posts: 2016
Getting serious about silencing dissent

 

Facebook Censorship of Alternative Media 

“Just the Beginning,” Says Top Neocon Insider

At a Berlin security conference, hardline neocon Jamie Fly appeared to claim some credit for the recent coordinated purge of alternative media.

By Max Blumenthal and Jeb Sprague (Grey Zone Project)

This October, Facebook and Twitter deleted the accounts of hundreds of users, including many alternative media outlets maintained by American users. Among those wiped out in the coordinated purge were popular sites that scrutinized police brutality and U.S. interventionism, like The Free Thought Project, Anti-Media, and Cop Block, along with the pages of journalists like Rachel Blevins.

Facebook claimed that these pages had “broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” However, sites like The Free Thought Project were verified by Facebook and widely recognized as legitimate sources of news and opinion….

In comments published here for the first time, a neoconservative Washington insider has apparently claimed a degree of credit for the recent purge — and promised more takedowns in the near future.

“Russia, China, and other foreign states take advantage of our open political system,” remarked Jamie Fly, a senior fellow and director of the Asia program at the influential think tank the German Marshall Fund, which is funded by the U.S. government and NATO. “They can invent stories that get repeated and spread through different sites. So we are just starting to push back. Just this last week Facebook began starting to take down sites. So this is just the beginning.”

Fly went on to complain that “all you need is an email” to set up a Facebook or Twitter account, lamenting the sites’ accessibility to members of the general public. He predicted a long struggle on a global scale to fix the situation, and pointed out that to do so would require constant vigilance.

Fly made these stunning comments to Jeb Sprague, who is a visiting faculty member in sociology at the University of California-Santa Barbara and co-author of this article. The two spoke during a lunch break at a conference on Asian security organized by the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik in Berlin, Germany.

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I have purchased hard copy of several controversial movies and books.  They may not always be available in the public domain in the years to come.  You know, "to protect the children."

Anatomy of a Great Deception

debu's picture
debu
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 17 2009
Posts: 237
Dershowitz???

Let's not get Dershowitz involved. His "grip on principle" is highly selective.

Any stance critical of Israel or supportive of the Palestinians brings forth his Israel uber alles ""principles"" in a flash.

Surely you remember Dershowitz's thuggish intervention to have DePaul University tenure to Norman Finkelstein some 10 years ago.

Dershowitz should be shunned.

Apart from that agree entirely with your post, Dave, as I usually do.

 

 

davefairtex's picture
davefairtex
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 3 2008
Posts: 5657
blind spot

debu-

I agree he's got a blind spot on Israel.  But people often do with their religious (slash tribal) association.  I try to take the good - which I think there's a lot there - and I let the stuff go that I don't agree with.

I'm not sure we have any saints these days.

For instance, I like Sam Harris - but I'm not an atheist.  How does that work?  I have no idea.

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 2016
Just want to acknowledge the frightening nature

Just want to acknowledge the frightening nature of the shooting in the synagoge last week.  I remember how shaken I was with the Charlottesville Riots last summer.  Hard to sleep, agitation, pacing, all my compensatory defenses were triggered and active.  

Our good friends and neighbors here were pretty shaken up, especially the Jewish ones.  We had a prayer vigil down town.  I think that it helped them to know that we were all dedicated to their safety and invited them to come to our house if ever they felt threatened--that we would defend them.

 

newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 10 2013
Posts: 323
Slippery Slopes, oil or ice

I appreciate that you guys are running a internet media business, a great one. I've also heard Gary Null talk about the slippery slope of censorship and I agree that one is in play. It's been a long strange journey at the end of the twentith century. I'm first generation of WWII refugees and never met my paternal grand-parents who were behind the "Iron Curtain". So I see, nay, feel, the dangerous totalitarian tendencies coming from all directions.

Does a rented ip address encrypted somehow make for anonymity and include some sort of rights and privilages to vomit out whatever ugliness we want? sort of. You guy's must see someone going off message with hate speech and take responsibility for doing something about it? We've seen this before with the financial system shutting down Assange and wikileaks, who last I checked didn't facilitate or provoke mass murder.

Old soviet joke: woman comes to market and asks man at counter, do you have fish? man says "here we have no meat, over there is where they have no fish"

Sad truth is we are born into captivity to this system. If the scenarios you describe come to pass we'll already be looking for where there is no free speech. There are places like Minds.com or steemit which are blockchain supported enterprises. No need for Paypal if you've got your crypto in place. I understand that is still a barrier to entry. Interesting times indeed.

THC0655 ~ marijuana, month, date (of birth) : an alternative backup channel is a good idea. Just snark'n bro... don't bogart that joint... dude!
Maybe I'll change my moniker to LSD0455

I still want to know when the PP Square Dance and Hoo'nanny is going to be. (... just like Woodstock, man). I'll be with Stephen Jenkinson Friday in NYC. Special thanks for presenting that.

 

 

 

 

 

debu's picture
debu
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 17 2009
Posts: 237
Edit - tenure denied...

ahem, omitted the verb.

Should have read: DePaul University tenure denied to Norman Finkelstein...

 

newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 10 2013
Posts: 323
newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 10 2013
Posts: 323
newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 10 2013
Posts: 323
Duplicate: Paul Craig Roberts Twitter Account Removed

https://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2018/10/26/my-suspended-twitter-account/

Yoxa's picture
Yoxa
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 21 2011
Posts: 303
Misleadng post title

The account that was taken down was an impostor account, not Paul Craig Roberts.

PCR said this:

Quote:

It is all over the internet and international media that Twitter has suspended my account.

This is not the case.

I do not use social media. 

I discovered that a Twitter account was operating in my name. 

I requested that the account be taken down.

 
newsbuoy's picture
newsbuoy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 10 2013
Posts: 323
In The Context of the Thread

It is completely within the context of the thread. Nothing misleading about it. It is in the eye of the beholder.  Which IS the point. Literal thinking is the express lane to confusion.

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is often difficult to
verify their authenticity." --Abraham Lincoln

 

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