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Daily Digest 10/18 - The Arabian Game of Thrones Heats Up, Medical Care When The Lights Go Out

Thursday, October 18, 2018, 1:15 PM

Economy

The Arabian Game of Thrones Heats Up (Time2Help)

MBS had bragged to close advisers that he also had Jared Kushner “in his pocket.” Lebanese President Michel Aoun demanded Hariri’s immediate release by the Saudi regime and his return to Beirut. Just as Riyadh denied it had murdered Khashoggi, it refused to admit that it was holding Hariri against his will. MBS ordered Hariri flown to Abu Dhabi to meet with MBS’s on-and-off-again ally, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed (MBZ), the heir apparent to the presidency of the United Arab Emirates. At the age of 57, MBZ is not as brash as the young and impetuous MBS.

Who’s On Call: Medical Care When The Lights Go Out (Thomas R.)

Medical care under austere conditions has been debated and extensively discussed by many experts and authors, with countless texts and even novels outlining the challenges to be faced and countered. The biggest problem with an efficient search for information regarding the care of ailment and injury in a grid-down environment or in times of economic or political collapse or violent conflict is made difficult because there is no universal scenario or single solution. No one can completely prepare for every eventuality, or be in possession of inexhaustible resources.

Nearly half the world lives on less than $5.50 a day: World Bank (Adam)

"Particularly distressing findings are that extreme poverty is becoming entrenched in a handful of countries and that the pace of poverty reduction will soon decelerate significantly," the report said.

At the $5.50-a-day threshold, global poverty fell to 46 percent from 67 percent between 1990 and 2015. The bank reported last month that extreme poverty had fallen to 10 percent in 2015.

New Samizdat: RT brings you a new censorship buster (Afridev)

New Samizdat will post the most interesting links, across all spectrums, with the intention of stimulating debate and providing access to information. And we hope it can play a small part in fighting modern censorship by giving you a trusted page where the most interesting news and views can be found.

Lifespan 2040: US down, China up, Spain on top (Adam)

The researchers found other nations set to lose ground in the race towards longevity include Canada (from 17th to 27th), Norway (12th to 20th), Australia (5th to 10th), Mexico (69th to 87th), Taiwan (35th to 42nd) and North Korea 125th to 153rd).

They Got Saudi Arabia Wrong Too (Paul D.)

Jamal Khashoggi’s state-sanctioned murder is a despicable act of depravity. But there is a lesson to be learned that is bigger than Khashoggi, Mohammed bin Salman, and even the U.S.-Saudi relationship: the elites who have been influencing public opinion for decades should no longer get a pass. They need to be called out and made to answer.

Armed looters target homes devastated by Hurricane Michael in Florida (thc0655)

"Most of our officers lost their homes, have been working 16- to 18-hour shifts with no sleep, no shower, and now they're encountering armed individuals," he said. "It's a stressful time for everyone in Bay County."

Some Words About Marshall McLuhan (Jesper A.)

Folklore is what McLuhan looks for, a folklore of the advanced society. This is akin to being critical of criticism, and on one front of being tradition-seeking in a world that changes rapidly. Proposing that modernity is traditional is an opposition in and of itself — to take this as your FUNDALMENTAL start is dualistic, McLuhan never accepted that which is in some sense good news, because by means of epi-cycles he escaped even this notion, how? By turning his back on history (quite literally), he walks backwards. Much like Charles S. Pierce he is looking for the exception not the rule, the exception proves the rule. This by the way is a jesuit practice, an inheritence from Augustine (or so I hear).

U.S. Shale’s Glory Days Are Numbered (Paul D.)

The investment bank still expects U.S. shale to add around 1 million barrels per day each year through 2021 at least. But with early signs of strain, limits on productivity and steeper decline rates, it is clear that the industry’s glory days are numbered.

Why scientists are so worried by the huge, sudden loss of insects (Paul D.)

Here’s one more sobering example of just how many species around the world are threatened.

The past few decades have seen a massive die-off of amphibians, which scientists fear are some of the most vulnerable animals to losses in a rapidly changing world. That may be because amphibians need both healthy aquatic and terrestrial environments to thrive. Change just one enough, and species suffer.

The UN's Devastating Climate Change Report Was Too Optimistic (Paul D.)

That worst-case outcome is not inevitable—but certain catastrophic outcomes are already locked in. According to a study inClimatic Change in 2016, parts of the Middle East and North Africa will become uninhabitable by 2050 due to intense summer heatwaves, even if we stay within 1.5°C.

UN Climate Change Report: A Choice between “Mad Max and Hunger Games” (thc0655)

The report’s glum findings were announced at a press conference by a United Nations panel in Incheon, South Korea. Panelists tried to sound optimistic, but there was no sugar-coating the report’s key finding.

“If you would like to stabilize global warming to 1.5°C, the key message is that net CO2 emissions at the global scale must reach zero by 2050,” said panelist Valerie Masson-Delmotte, a French climate scientist and research director at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission. “That’s the most important finding of the report.”

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 10/16/18

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

21 Comments

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
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Medical Care in Grid Down Environment

I thought that the ariticle posted today by a trauma surgeon /  prepper was very good and overlaps many of the things that I have been pondering.  I will repeat several main points and add my 2 cents.

His article is recommended!

1.  Trauma care will be minimal.  There is no operating room, anesthesiologist or surgical ICU waiting.  Prevention of injury becomes of paramount importance.  If you shatter your knee bones with an ax while chopping firewood, at best you can hope to be permanently disabled and walk with a brace and crutch for the rest of your life.

Wash wounds with clean water, soap (or a small dash of betadine in clean water).  Wash out visible dirt/gravel.  Put a clean cloth over the surface.  Lie down and rest.   Rinse wounds gently 2-3 times a day.  Apply direct pressure to control bleeding.  No tourniquets.

Don't travel or work alone. We will need team-mates to provide care when sick or injured.

2.  Avoid fecal-oral contamination.  The single greatest factor in the increased human longevity this century is the flush toilet that removes fecal material from our living environment.  A close second is the abundace of clean tap water lets us wash our hands before we eat, wash food and eating utensils.  Infectious diarrhea is a major killer in the 3rd world, much of which is spread when bacteria in feces get into our food and drinking water.

Think very carefully about where your latrine is placed.  Keep it well away from the garden, pond, or drinking water.  If someone can advise more about human-manuer composting, rather than simply burying the latrine, I would like to learn more about this.  A pit or trench latrine well removed from living and eating areas.  A bar of soap hanging from a rope ("soap on a rope") with a bucket of water for cleaning hands close to the latrine.

3.  Treatment of diarrhea.  Most diarrheal illnesses kill via dehydration and electrolyte disturbances, not by overwhelming infection.  Oral fluid replacement can be very helpful and turn most diarrheal illnesses around even if antibiotics are not available.  1 quart of clean water, 6 tsp sugar, 1/2 tsp of salt.  Then "drink until you pee."  (Potassium, magnesium, zinc and bicarb all play a role too.....)

4.  Home made shoes to prevent foot injuries.  Sandals can be made from old tires and a leather strip.  Pevention is the name of the game as a bad foot laceration or puncture that gets infected can be life-threatening.

DennisC's picture
DennisC
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Feeling "green" these days?

Up to your gills in CO2?  An interesting take on e-vehicles and batteries, IMO.  Seems like we should be making everything with windpower-based energy.  Oh, wait...seems like we can't beat the benefit of those old dinosaurs, mastodons, and plants that turned into an amazing, usable goo underground (assuming, of course, the dinosaurs actually existed).  Paging Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine, Dr. Howard, Dr. Darwin.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-16/the-dirt-on-clean-ele...

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Mike Maloney on Hungarian CB accumulating gold

Mike Maloney has a new video bringing attention to information in an article on Zerohedge, by Ronan Manly of Bullionstart.com, re the Hungarian Central Bank's accumulation of gold.

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newsbuoy
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Destroying The Myths of Market Fundamentalism Forum - LIVE

Market Fundamentalism is the dogmatic belief that unregulated, "laissez-faire" markets are the only answer to the world's biggest social and economic problems. It’s time to confront the myths of Market Fundamentalism with compelling empirical reality that deconstructs and destroys the plutocratic hoax. Join us for an enlightening forum hosted by Ralph Nader featuring top academics, economists, and experts who will present arguments to turn the tide in this "battle of ideas. Event Schedule

09:30:00 AM Ralph Nader Opening Remarks 09:50:00 AM Bert Foer Antitrust & How Kleptocracy Corrupts What Markets Are Supposed to Do https://www.antitrustinstitute.org/pe...
10:10:00 AM William Black Financial and Insurance Rackets https://law.umkc.edu/directory/facult...
10:30:00 AM Robert Kuttner The Virtues and Limits of Markets http://prospect.org/authors/robert-ku...
10:50:00 AM Greg LeRoy Subsidies, Handouts, Giveaways and Bailouts https://www.goodjobsfirst.org/about-u...
11:10:00 AM James Henry Systematized Tax Evasion https://globaljustice.yale.edu/people...
11:30:00 AM Lunch
12:15:00 PM Russell Mokhiber Systemic Corporate Crime—Business as Usual https://www.corporatecrimereporter.co...
12:35:00 PM Rob Weissman How Market Fundamentalism Corrupts The Political Process https://www.citizen.org/about/robert-... 12:55:00 PM Dennis Kelleher Endemic Market Failure/Inequality https://bettermarkets.com/dennis-kell...
01:15:00 PM Tom McGarity The Assault on Regulation (And the Case for It) https://law.utexas.edu/faculty/thomas...
01:35:00 PM Rena Steinzor The Assault on Regulation (And the Case for It) https://www.law.umaryland.edu/directo...
01:55:00 PM Damon Silvers SEC and the Inadequacy of Financial Regulation https://aflcio.org/policy-experts/dam...
02:15:00 PM Joel Rogers Public Goods https://law.wisc.edu/profiles/jrogers...
02:35:00 PM William Lazonick Stock Buybacks https://www.ineteconomics.org/researc...
02:55:00 PM Lori Wallach Market Fundamentalism and Trade https://www.citizen.org/our-work/glob...
03:15:00 PM Steven Clifford The Lack of a Free Market for Executive Compensation http://www.stevecliffordauthor.com/ab...
03:35:00 PM Ralph Nader Institutionalizing Lawlessness—Systematically Subverting Markets https://nader.org/biography/
3:50-4:30 PM Discussion

thc0655's picture
thc0655
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Life imitates art

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-10-18/khashoggi-murder-suspect-dies-suspicious-car-accident

A 31-year-old lieutenant in the Saudi Royal Air Force said to have participated in the killing of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi died in a "suspicious car accident" in Riyadh, according to Turkish media. 

Mashal Saad al-Bostani was reportedly on a 15-man hit squad dispatched to Saudi Arabia's Istanbul Consulate in Turkey on October 2 during Khashoggi's visit, before the team quickly left the country, according to daily Yeni Şafak. 

Albostani entered Turkey at 1:45 a.m. local time (2245GMT). He stayed at the Wyndham Grand Hotel and left the country at 9:46 p.m. local time (1846GMT) on a private jet which belonged to the Sky Prime Aviation company. -Yeni Şafak

Bostani's alleged role in the murder of the Saudi journalist are unclear, as are details of the traffic accident in Riyadh - prompting accusations of a cover up by those who orchestrated the Khashoggi hit. Meanwhile, a columnist for Turkey's Daily Hürriyetwrote on Thursday that Mohammad al Otaibi, Saudi Arabia's Istanbul consul-general, would be "the next execution."

Turkish daily Yeni Şafak reported Oct. 17 that Al-Otaibi’s voice could be heard in one of the recordings, which Turkish authorities are believed to have, of Khashoggi’s “interrogation” at the consulate.

According to the report, after Al-Otaibi told the interrogators to “do it somewhere else outside or I will be in trouble,” he was told to “shut up if you want to live when you are back in Saudi Arabia.

MBS is on his last legs if he's disappearing his own cronies, bodyguards and assassination teams.  If they don't get him themselves, they'll surely rat him out to someone who can. An operation much smaller than 15 guys would've been much easier to hide, but I guess that's what happens when you so full of yourself that you throw caution and good sense to the wind.  "Rules for Rulers" surely has a chapter on avoiding harming your insiders who "know where all the bodies are buried." (not to mention actually put them there).
 
"I've still got the shovel!"
TechGuy's picture
TechGuy
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SandPuppy wrote: "Don't

SandPuppy wrote:

"Don't travel or work alone. We will need team-mates to provide care when sick or injured."

And don't do something danagerous when you exhausted. You more likely to injure yourself. When doing somthing that could cause injury, think it through first! Always look at options to do it safely. Even a simple injury like a pulled muscle can have a bigger impact on your survive. A sprang akle could be a death sentence if your are miles away from shelter in the winter months. The best medical procedure is to not get hurt at all!

 

Barnbuilder's picture
Barnbuilder
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SP

Great info from the author of the article and you Sand Puppy.  I have made that home made hydration formula before and it does really do a good job.  Looking forward to the future articles in this series.

Afridev's picture
Afridev
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Couple additions around health

Some additional background:

On latrines, solid waste management, safe disposal of dead bodies, wastewater management:

http://www.unicefinemergencies.com/downloads/eresource/docs/WASH/Emergency%20Sanitation%20(WEDC).pdf

It has simple designs and good instructions

 

Some general background on health issues in developing countries:

http://www.who.int/heli/risks/ehindevcoun/en/

Respiratory infections are one of the main issues: have systems in place that avoid that you are exposed to smoke. Especially in colder climates for heating and cooking, but also in warmer climates for cooking and heating water, ensure you have adequate wood stoves, know how to sweep chimneys, and have the tools necessary to do it (these skills/ materials may even be something you can add value with to your community)

An improved stove can help with reduction in smoke exposure and fuel efficiency:

http://www.appropedia.org/Improved_solid_biofuel_stoves

 

 

 

Michael_Rudmin's picture
Michael_Rudmin
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I am thinking about good safe house design

So, what would we want to do for house design? I imagine:

You want a latrine that actually destroys human waste. You probably want a holding tank followed by a rocket wood stove that completely dehydrates, then burns, and reburns the gas is one idea.

Anyone have thoughts on this?

Then for the house itself:

You need airflow, and you need cooling during the summer and heating during the winter. But there's more: humidity. And there's something else too: you need good food storage.

So my thought is a core house built in winding stair format around a wood stove at the bottom. The wood stove exhaust heats the air around the chimney, and the chimney radiates heat to the rooms. But instead of having the rooms right against the chimney, instead dehydration racks are right there, with doors to access them all the way up and down. But you open up the very bottom or the very top, to let the airflow through. In addition, you have to have your air intake through the ground below, but either delivered straight to the fire, or first to the house and from the house to the fire. That way, you control the temperature of the house.

When that is all done, you can bleed off some of the human waste to experiment with other zero-effluent designs that convert the nutrients to a more useful format.

I'm partial to a three-phase system involving solid processing (kudzu, fungal, worm, insect, bacterial) liquid (algae, water plants, duckweed, fish) gas (air plants). do that for a path of many processing, and you might get a good cycle.

TechGuy's picture
TechGuy
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Re: safe house design

1. Go with standard stick framing but go with advanced framing (2x6 24" on center spacing). The Thicker wall will let you go with thicker insulation and 24" OC reduces thermal bridging. Anything complex\non standard you run into issues finding contractors & likely run into unforseen problems.

2. Go with 2" exterior rigid foam insulation. Thick internal insulation can cause issues with moisture build up on the exterior sheathing causing mold and rot. The exterior insulation will help help the sheathing warm and avoid condensation. 2" rigid foam is the thickest standard panels available. You're likely going to run into issues sourcing thicker panels. I would not recommend using SIPs for wall contruction because they are expensive and make it difficult to route utilities (plumbing, electrical, data). SIPs are a good option for a roof.

3. Make your home a "tight" home that has very low air leakage. This will reduce heating & cooling loses as well as prevent external pollution\contaminates from entering your living space. Use an ERV or HRV (depending on where you live) to bring in fresh but filtered air that is also temperature adjusted by using the exhaust air to heat\cool the fresh air.

4. Recommand avoid using a wood boiler\stove inside your home. You going to be bringing in debris from the wood and removing ash. as well as some combustible products become airborne inside your home. Use an external wood boiler (ie outdoor wood boiler). Also having an wood boiler\stove increases the chances of a home fire. I believe the number one cause of home fires is a internal wood stove.

5. If your budget permits, go with a radiant heating system, whch provides uniform heating throughout your entire home. Also your heat source can operate considerable more efficient (since the water temperature only needs to get to about 80-87F as apposed to convention (160F). With the low water tempertures you could couple with solar thermal panels.

6. if your budget and area permits it: go with full basement. This will permit full access to all utilities (plumbing,electrical\HVAC) as well as a emergency shelter (either mother nature or man-made).

 

borderpatrol's picture
borderpatrol
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Latrines aren't best for protection of surface water

Putting human waste in cattail beds or comfrey beds during the growing season is a good way to deal with human waste.  These plants comsume huge amounts of nutrients during the growing season it's best to only put them there during the growning season. Storing human waste in tubs with wood chips or other dry biomass during the off season and then placing them  in beds during the growing season is  a good way of protecting surface water.    Here in Ohio, many poultry farmers are placing large amounts  of poultry waste on the soil during the non growing season  and ends up in Lake Erie leading to toxic algae blooms.  Same thing happens to surface water from leach feilds, no grass or vegetation during the off season and it leaches into soil, not good. 

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Safe House Design

TechGuy: "Anything complex\non standard you run into issues finding contractors & likely run into unforseen problems."

So I gather you would not recommend "double-wall" construction - say two 2x4 or 2x6 frames with an 8 to 12 inch separation in order to provide for more insulation and avoid any "thermal bridges"?

If one did know a contractor specializing in "green homes" and was willing to take some risks - and to be on-site to supervise every step of the work - could it possibly be justified in order to try to realize significant energy savings?

Or is it just not worth the extra expense/risk/hassle as more "conventional" practices (2x6's with say, "Rockwool" (trade name?) and exterior 2" rigid foam) would likely achieve the bulk of the efficiency sought after anyways?

I've been trying find data/accounts to verify if double-walls are really worth it, but information seems to be very hard to come by. (Possibly another short-coming of pursuing that approach?)

It would be nice to see "energy/resource efficient housing" or "home construction and renovating" as a separate forum on PP - unless I've missed finding something like that here.

Thanks for any advice!

Afridev's picture
Afridev
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On latrines...

If latrines are well located, properly built and operated, they are often a much better solution than off-site sanitation (e.g. sewerage system) and definitely better then 'open solutions'. There is usually no issue with surface water if basic rules concerning placement, construction and maintenance are respected. Making an adeqauate latrine for household level is pretty straightforward in most rural conditions and easy to operate. I've seen pretty awful situations which exposed many to faecal waste just because 'it was a risk to (ground)water' (I worked in this domain for many years). Yes there can in specific circumstances be risks to ground- and surface water but these are often overblown.

A good latrine is a local treatment plant that deals with the issues at the place where they are generated (and as there are normally many latrines, the problem is diluted compared to centralised systems).

If fresh faecal waste is exposed to mammals or insects however, the risk of transmission is very real, and the more dense the population and the contact to animals/ insects, the larger the risk.

If you're interested in recovering nutrients from human waste, try to separate urine from faeces as urine contains much more nutrients and the risk of disease transmission is much lower.

TechGuy's picture
TechGuy
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"So I gather you would not

"So I gather you would not recommend "double-wall" construction - say two 2x4 or 2x6 frames with an 8 to 12 inch separation in order to provide for more insulation and avoid any "thermal bridges"?"

The issue with double wall is the buildup of moisture that leads to mold & rot. Joe Lstiburek did an analysis of a Double wall home in Mass that excess moisture build up on the sheathing, than never really disapates over time. See Joe's article about the perfect wall (hint best practice is to put some really good insulation on the outside):

https://buildingscience.com/documents/insights/bsi-001-the-perfect-wall

There are also several Youtube videos from Joe that explain advanced building implements (with pros and cons). Definately worth viewing.

"Or is it just not worth the extra expense/risk/hassle as more "conventional" practices (2x6's with say, "Rockwool" (trade name?) and exterior 2" rigid foam) would likely achieve the bulk of the efficiency sought after anyways?"

I guess it demands on how efficient you want to be, but chasing a few extra percent of efficiency becomes expontially more costly. The idea to to build an cost effective & efficient home but not to the point you never recover your capital investment. I ended up settling with 2x6\24" construction with 2" foam since going beyond increases costs. I used a green home builder in my area who steered me away from double wall construction.  That said focus on making your home air tight since that has a good return on your investment. Also put the money your savings (ie cheaper 2x6/24 instead of double wall) it better servicing equipment. Perhaps go with Radiant heating floors. Even if you have R-50 walls which could be heating using a single candle. you still going to need to bring in fresh air from the outside that will need heating\cooling\dehimidifation.

I would recommend Keeping it simple: Less costly, easier to build, and less problems during construction.

"I've been trying find data/accounts to verify if double-walls are really worth it, but information seems to be very hard to come by. (Possibly another short-coming of pursuing that approach?)"

There is lot of information on Building science website As well as Green home advisor.

"If one did know a contractor specializing in "green homes" and was willing to take some risks - and to be on-site to supervise every step of the work - could it possibly be justified in order to try to realize significant energy savings?"

Realistically you need to be on sight if you want it done right. There are just so many issues that will come up that you need or want to address them yourself. For instance you might need to adjust walls in order because you notice issues that were not apparent in the drawings or 3D views. You need to switch the door swing from right to left, move a window to accomidate a load point that the engineer missed. Some times you need to address material issues (not the product you order shows up because the supplier had them in stock, or the materials arrive defective). There are many issues that your builder might not notice and if your builder is operating on a fix cost he is likely go the shortest path to get your home completed within the fixed cost agreed upon.

Another  good source of learning about efficient\durable homes is Matt Risinger on YouTube. He has a lot of short videos that explain home construction, pros\cons of different building materials & products.

 

 

 

TechGuy's picture
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Human Waste

"f fresh faecal waste is exposed to mammals or insects however, the risk of transmission is very real, and the more dense the population and the contact to animals/ insects, the larger the risk."

Realistically if your building a home odds are that the town or county will only grant you a building permit if you either use a sewer or sepic system (tank & drain field) I doubt they will permit you use an outhouse.

I don't think trying to recycle human waste is worth the effort, and you still need dispose of other forms or waste (ie laudry\floor cleaning agents). If you want to be self relient a standard septic system is the best option.

 

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Michael_Rudmin
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Sortof yes, sortof no on recycling human waste

First, if you're going to build now, you definitely want a septic, and every eight years or so you will need to get it pumped.

What happens when everything crashes?

One of the earlier postings, maybe by SP, was that you need a way to deal with the waste.

Well, you can set up a pumping system, ahead of time, and have that ready. But what then?

My answer was first to triply burn it. That solves the problem short term. However, it isn't the ideal way of disposing of human waste; it is, itself, highly wasteful of nutrients. So if we're going to try again, try to do better, you want to start researching better ways of dealing with it, finding a natural process that completely disposes of the waste, while cycling the valuable potassium, and so on.

So set up a system that can allow diversion of a small portion, and start experimenting. You can always dispose of the last waste products by burning, but you can see what works.

Anyhow, that was my thinking. Also part of my thinking is that the waste disposal system should NOT be part of the home heating system. If something goes wrong, you want options other than moving out of your house. But if the waste disposal system is separate, then you still want a home heating system that works well.

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Michael_Rudmin
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More important than insulatxon

... is humidity control. Quite simply, mold can kill, and mold (as well as certain pestillential insects such as dust mites) depends on humidity being high-- so low humidity is needed. In a normal house design, that is accomplished with leaky, poor thermal construction.

If you don't want leaks, such as is required in a nuclear fallout shelter, you are going to have to accomplish the lower humidity in other ways. One way is to keep all running water out of the house... but you'd have to go outside then. So that's a problem.

Another way is active dehumidification, as airconditioners can provide --but that requires power, and is tech-intensive. If we go through a collapse, the tech might not work.

I'm not sure I have a good answer there, yet.

I think it's an area ripe for discussion.

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Wendal
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Thanks for the advice!

I will definitely check out the various sources provided - although I already feel my pubescent infatuation with the "double walls" idea fading fast.

I guess it's a question of how good is good enough - and certainly there are other factors to consider beyond just high R-values.

Thanks as well for the various comments regarding humidity and mold, etc.

I would end up feeling pretty stupid to have bent over backwards to create the highest R-value walls, only to end up like Stephen King's "Jody Verrill" character from "Creepshow"!

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Type 2 Diabetes in Grid Down Environment--Fasting, Exercise

The major medical scourges of developed western society are 1) obesity, 2) diabetes (type 2), 3) hypertension, and 4) atherosclerosis.   Arthritis deserves a (dis)honorable mention.  All of these are closely related to insulin resistance.

(This discussion does NOT include type 1 diabetes.  In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is damaged and does not make insulin. Most commonly Type 1 begins in childhood.)   

With type 2, the pancreas is making insulin, but the biochemical receptor mechanisms in each cell have become insensitive to the insulin, requiring additional insulin to be given via shots, and the addition of medications to tweek the insulin receptor mechanisms into adequate function.

Intermittent fasting improves insulin sensitivity.  3 brief case report are available where intermittent fasting was used over about 10 months to improve insulin sensitivity.  In each case, patients needed less diabetes medicines and were able to discontinue most medicines.

The Hemoglobin A1c is used to measure an "average" blood sugar over the last 3 months.  In these 3 cases, HgA1c charts improved even as diabetes medications and insulin shots were taperd off gradually over several months.

Muscular activity clears glucose from the blood via a mechanism that is independent of insulin.  Exercise improves blood sugar control.  Even taking a brisk 15 minute walk after a meal improves glycemic control.  Julian Whitaker was well known advocate for behavioural treatments for T2DM.

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Thus there is some hope for insulin dependent Type 2 diabetics in a grid down situation. [Lots of work to be done, intermittent feeding, very few of the concentrated sugar sources that we love.]   Intermittent fasting, low sugar intake and exercise should improve these conditions.

Any of the Naturopaths want to add suggestions for herbal insulin sensitizers here?

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TechGuy
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Michael_Rudmin asked: "Well,

Michael_Rudmin asked:

"Well, you can set up a pumping system, ahead of time, and have that ready. But what then?"

You don't need any pumping for a septic system. its gravity feed. If your refering to the septic tank eventually filling up. You can always oversize it. and limit solids you put down the drain. Regardless I doubt you be able to get a building permit without a septic or sewer connection. In the worst case, there is a collapse and your septic falls you can always build an outhouse.

 

Michael_Rudmin Wrote:

"is humidity control. Quite simply, mold can kill, and mold (as well as certain pestillential insects such as dust mites) depends on humidity being high-- so low humidity is needed. In a normal house design, that is accomplished with leaky, poor thermal construction."

Thats what an ERV and HVAC with Dehumidation is installed. This is pretty much become standard Tight home construction.

 

Michael_Rudmin Wrote:

"Another way is active dehumidification, as airconditioners can provide --but that requires power, and is tech-intensive. If we go through a collapse, the tech might not work."

Well you can turn a tight house in a leaky house by simply opening windows a crack. Electricity isn't difficult to produce, Solar, wind, Hydro, or generator (wood-gas, or steam). Electricity was a 19th century technology

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TechGuy
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Posts: 453
Re:Type 2 Diabetes in Grid Down Environment--Fasting, Exercise

One issue I see is that in a Grid down collapse, is that people will consume considerably more carbohydrates & starches. Which would make it more difficult to control blood sugar. I am not sure the diets will improve during a collapse, but likely to deterior as people eat whatever they can. Fresh fruits & vegetibles would be seasonable as no more imports from abroad. People are likely to eat more canned foods, that will either have a high acid, sugar or salt content.

I think in the big picture, of a long term collapse (>3 months) more than 90% of the population will die off: with disease & violence being the leading causes. I would imagine common water containmation diseases (Typhoid, Cholera, Legionellosis, etc) and dysentery will be leading causes of death. I would imagine most surface water sources would become highly contaminated as people start using streams, rivers, lakes, etc as makeshift toilets. Its likely that sewage treatment plants would fail and  leak or dump raw sewage into enviroment. I am not sure rainwater will be drinkable as I think in a collapse there will considerable air pollution as people set widespread fires (arson, makeshift stoves\heating systems that burn down there homes). I recall after 9/11 the trade center bullding continully had a smoke plumb for well over a month,even with firefighters pouring water constantely. I would image that without water or firefighters, entire cities will burn and continue to burn for long periods. Thus Rainwater collection is probably not going to be an option. My recommendation is to have a potable underground water source, preferrable deep so any surface contamination does not quickly contaminate it.

I recall that during the 2005 crisis in New Orleans, the football stadium (used as shelter) had to be evacuated after about 4 or 5 days because possiblity of waterborne diseases (bathrooms became clogged and the water was contaminated). In the case of New Orleans, residents had access to clean drinking water as gov't & business brought in trucks filled with water and bottle watered. In a full collapse there aren't likely to be water delivery trucks. Thus diabetes will be of no significant consequence when even most of the healthest people die off.

FWIW: I believe it would be possible to synthesize insulin locally. IIRC insulin is produced using a gene modified yeast to produce human insulin. If you are able to obtain your own culture of this, you could produce your own. Prior to this, insulin was collected from mammals. I suppose one could learn how to use the old process, but I believe insulin from other mammals isn't exactly the same as human insulin which can cause problems.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin

 

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