Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 3/23 - Good News Friday: Expanding Voter Participation, Why Forests Give You Awe

Friday, March 23, 2018, 10:21 AM

This is Good News Friday, where we find some good economic, energy, and environmental news and share it with PP readers. Please send any positive news to [email protected] with subject header "Good News Friday." We will save and post weekly. Enjoy!

Economy

Bills aimed at expanding WA voter participation signed by Inslee (jdargis)

Another bill signed into law will enact automatic voter registration for eligible Washington residents, starting in 2019. Currently, individuals have to opt-in for voter registration when applying for a driver’s license. Under the new system, you would have to opt-out.

A third bill will expand voter registration, starting in 2018, even allowing same day registration in person the night of elections, up until 8:00 p.m.

Christian Care Home workers strike ends with agreement that includes wage increases, insurance provisions and seniority protection (sv)

“I think they thought if they treated us badly enough, we would give up, but that just made us more determined to stand up for ourselves and our residents,” she said.

State Representative Bruce Franks Jr. was a vocal supporter of striking workers.

Immigrant Reunited With Child Months After Separation by U.S. (sv)

The woman reunited with her daughter Friday is from a village in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and speaks little English. According to the ACLU lawsuit, she passed the initial screening to determine whether she had a "credible fear" of returning to the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Seeking a Roadmap for the New American Middle Class (jdargis)

Let’s start by dispelling the idea that postwar advances for American workers were some kind of natural inevitability that could never be replicated today. Yes, in the 1940s, the United States was in a commanding position of economic dominance over potential rivals decimated by war. And yes, companies were able to translate the manufacturing capacity and technological know-how built up through the military into astounding new bounty for consumers. But, when it comes to profitability, business has also had plenty of boom times in recent decades, with no parallel advances for workers.

Federal court orders EPA to implement smog rules (sv)

Pruitt last June initially intended to stall the Oct. 1 deadline by one year, but quickly reversed course the next day, without saying whether he would honor the Oct. 1 deadline.

Sixteen state attorneys general as well as a coalition of environmental groups sued to force Pruitt to meet the deadline and implement the smog standards.

U.S. loses bid to halt children's climate change lawsuit (sv)

In seeking to overturn that ruling, the government said letting the case proceed could lead to burdensome litigation, and provoke a “constitutional crisis” by pitting courts against Trump and the many other Executive Branch officials named as defendants.

But in Wednesday’s decision, Chief Judge Sidney Thomas said the dismissal request was premature, and deciding whether the plaintiffs’ claims were too broad could be addressed through the normal legal process.

Empty half the Earth of its humans. It's the only way to save the planet (blackeagle)

Cities emerge from the confusion of possibilities as beacons of hope. By definition they house a lot of people on small patches of land, which makes them hugely better than suburbia. In ecological terms, suburbs are disastrous, while cities can perhaps work.

Why Forests Give You Awe (tmn)

It’s a positive experience. Keltner’s research has revealed that awe is good for our minds, bodies, and relationships. Awe may even make us kinder. It appears to encourage us to look beyond ourselves and to cooperate with others. Tapping into this power may be as simple as taking a walk in a forest; the less familiar it is, the better—Keltner and Haidt say nature is more likely to produce awe if it transcends one’s previous knowledge.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 3/22/18

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

4 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 4097
Illinois budget deficit soared to a record $14.6 billion in fisc

Illinois budget deficit soared to a record $14.6 billion in fiscal year ...

STLtoday.com-21 hours ago
The ballooning deficit, as measured on a generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) basis, underscored the cost of an impasse between Illinois' Republican governor and Democrats who control the Legislature. That tussle left the state without complete budgets for an unprecedented two straight fiscal years.

Treasury Plans to Sell $229 Billion in Debt

Wall Street Journal-21 hours ago
The U.S. Treasury Department will auction $229 billion in securities next week, comprising $163 billion in new debt and $66 billion in previously sold debt. Details (all with minimum denominations of $100):. Monday: $51 billion in 13-week bills, a reopening of an issue first sold on Dec. 28, 2017, maturing June 28, 2018.

Alberta budget 2018: Debt to skyrocket to $96 billion by 2023

Edmonton Sun-Mar 22, 2018
A balanced budget in Alberta is still five years away, the provincial government said Thursday as it unveiled a spending plan that forecasts debt ballooning to $96 billion by 2023. The 2018 provincial budget, unveiled in the legislature Thursday afternoon by Finance Minister Joe Ceci, points to an oil price shock that ...

 

Time2help's picture
Time2help
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Jun 9 2011
Posts: 2808
Pop?

Guess only time will tell.

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1811
We are the bacteria in a superheated ocean floor vent

We recently toured the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in DC and saw the "Origins of Man" exhibit.  Then again the natural history museum in Albuquerque last week.

So I'm pondering philosophically about the inability of MOST organisms to adapt to change.  Rainfall patterns shift and the valley where the clan has lived for generations no longer supports the crops and wildlife upon which their traditional lives depend.   Groups go extinct on a regular basis, even after persisting for millions of years successfully.   "Our way is to hunt ibex in the spring and bear in the fall.  That is the way of our forefathers.  Traditional.  Sacred."    A species, like the humans of Easter Island, cut trees and build huts.  This is what we do.  A few YELLOW Meme thinkers watch the flow of resources uneasily and see the trouble.  But most are not able to change.   They cut down the last trees upon which their lives depend, and die.

But, occasionally, as traditional life crumbles, a few individuals learn a new way of living.  Is this mostly cognitive flexibility?  This happens while the great majority die off.   Some are able to migrate.  Some can learn new tricks:  changing food sources, ways of growing and preserving food, building shelters, developing techniques previously unknown.

So this is us, PP'ers.  We are imagining what it would be like to live in a world where the local grocery store is not restocked and no water comes out of the tap because the big (electrical) pumping stations are offline.  What if our freezers no longer worked?  No police come during troubled moments and we could not call due to no phone network.

Now, right at the moment, green beans can be purchased, pre-canned, for $1.20.  It makes little sense to grow and can our own, except as a hobby or a soul nurturing, simplified, lifestyle choice.  But these skills may be one of the foundational adaptations.

We are one group of plankton, among others, planning on how we might move from the sunny surface down into a hot, but nutritious ocean floor vent.

TechGuy's picture
TechGuy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 13 2008
Posts: 380
Re: Green Beans

Sand Puppy Wrote: "Now, right at the moment, green beans can be purchased, pre-canned, for $1.20. It makes little sense to grow and can our own, except as a hobby or a soul nurturing"

Well it does considing that garden grown produce is as fresh as you can get. Nothing beats fresh picked fruits and Vegetables that aren't treated with fowl pesticides. Most annoying is that supermarket fruit is waxed to improve appears & shelf-life. Are we buying editable fruit or pieces of art? The reason to grow instead of buying is that you know that garden items are not containmated with something harmful (well as long as you don't use something harmful and your soil isn't contaminated)

Its pretty darn easy to grow green beans and bean plants will continue to produce beens for the entire season as you pick them. 

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