Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 3/3 - Sacrificing Future Spending, Bacon Really Is Killing Us

Saturday, March 3, 2018, 11:13 AM


Palantir Has Secretly Been Using New Orleans To Test Its Predictive Policing Technology (tmn)

Predictive policing technology has proven highly controversial wherever it is implemented, but in New Orleans, the program escaped public notice, partly because Palantir established it as a philanthropic relationship with the city through Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s signature NOLA For Life program. Thanks to its philanthropic status, as well as New Orleans’ “strong mayor” model of government, the agreement never passed through a public procurement process.

Vladimir Putin just revealed 6 brand new Russian weapons – and they are impressive (Alex M.)

That said, the capabilities of the Sarmat missile are much higher. Weighing over 200 tonnes, it has a short boost phase, which makes it more difficult to intercept for missile defence systems. The range of the new heavy missile, the number and power of its combat blocs is bigger than Voevoda’s. Sarmat will be equipped with a broad range of powerful nuclear warheads, including hypersonic, and the most modern means of evading missile defence. The high degree of protection of missile launchers and significant energy capabilities the system offers will make it possible to use it in any conditions…..

Putin’s stunning revelations about new Russian weapons systems (Alex M.)

All of these systems can be armed with conventional or nuclear warheads. Just think of the implications! Not only does that mean that the entire ABM effort of the USA is now void and useless, but also that from now US aircraft carrier battle groups can only be used against small, defenseless, nations!

Sacrificing Future Spending (GE Christenson)

Central banks assist the delusion. They buy sovereign debt (by the trillions), push interest rates lower to reduce debt service expenditures (lowered to multi-decade or multi-century lows) and increase their balance sheets (code for “money printing”) to “stimulate” the economy.

‘All-In or Nothing’: How West Virginia’s Teacher Strike Was Months in the Making (jdargis)

The teachers disregarded their own union leaders’ advice to return to work earlier this week, opting instead for a thunderous showdown with members of the state’s increasingly conservative leadership. The direction in the next few days is anyone’s guess.

Yes, bacon really is killing us (tmn)

The WHO advised that consuming 50g of processed meat a day – equivalent to just a couple of rashers of bacon or one hotdog – would raise the risk of getting bowel cancer by 18% over a lifetime. (Eating larger amounts raises your risk more.) Learning that your own risk of cancer has increased from something like 5% to something like 6% may not be frightening enough to put you off bacon sandwiches for ever. But learning that consumption of processed meat causes an additional 34,000 worldwide cancer deaths a year is much more chilling. According to Cancer Research UK, if no one ate processed or red meat in Britain, there would be 8,800 fewer cases of cancer. (That is four times the number of people killed annually on Britain’s roads.)

New Study Details How Climate Change Will Affect California Agriculture (jdargis)

Among the warning signs found in California are increased maximum and decreased minimum temperatures, unpredictable precipitation, reduced snowpack, and a greater frequency of climate emergencies (like droughts and floods). By tracking those factors in specific areas, the researchers are able to make certain predictions. For example: Fruits like apricots, peaches, nectarines, and plums have specific cold-weather requirements (at least as they’re grown now). Currently, about 20-45 percent of the Central Valley is able to support those crops; by the end of the century, only 10 percent of that same area will be suitable as daytime heatwaves increase and nighttime temperatures rise. For crops requiring even more cold weather, like apples cherries, and pears? “Virtually no areas will remain suitable by 2041-2060,” reads the study.

A slow-motion catastrophe threatens 350-year-old farms (jdargis)

Sea-level rise near the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States, is twice as high as the global average. It’s not solely the result of atmospheric warming, melting ice, and expanding waters. The ground is also subsiding. This is happening for a variety of reasons, most notably aquifer withdrawals and the continued settling of land that had been pushed up by ice sheets to the north during the last Ice Age. “We are sinking and the water is rising,” says Michael Scott, a geographer at Salisbury University in Maryland.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 3/1/18

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

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saxplayer00o1's picture
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As Pensions Grow, State Struggling To Pay (Connecticut)

As Pensions Grow, State Struggling To Pay

Hartford Courant-10 hours ago
With more than 50,000 retirees or their beneficiaries receiving payments, the state is projected to be pumping $2.5 billion into the fund in each of the next two years — more than double the $1 billion in the 2013 fiscal year. The pensions are a key factor in the state's fiscal troubles as lawmakers face a projected budget deficit ...


DennisC's picture
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Joined: Mar 19 2011
Posts: 285
Thanks for the Great Report

We'll look at it, but maybe not until 2019.

I'm not sure why anyone (anyone that is concerned, of course) should waste any breath on stuff like this because it's shaping up to be the same in every state.  The panel mentioned, The Commission on Fiscal Sustainability and Economic Growth, in CT, must have gotten it right since it seems (at least according to this article) that hardly anyone in the legislature thinks it makes sense.

A much-anticipated report on stabilizing state finances and jump-starting Connecticut’s economy isn’t likely to get far before legislators adjourn in early May to run for re-election.

That’s according to leaders of the legislative panel with jurisdiction over most of the Commission on Fiscal Sustainability and Economic Growth’s recommendations.

“I presume there will be problems” among many Democrats with certain panel recommendations, Rep. Jason Rojas, D-East Hartford, House chair of the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee, said Friday.

“I would venture to say 100 percent of the Senate Republican Caucus would have a problem” with at least one key commission tax proposal, said Sen. L. Scott Frantz of Greenwich, the Senate GOP chair of the finance committee.


Too many tough choices, and it is an election year afterall.  If I was a politician, I'd just sit back, wait for the "event horizon" to appear, and keep my constituents as happy and well-lubricated as possible in the meantime, and get re-elected (number one priority).

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