Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 8/27 - Lawn Guilt, The World’s Worst Humanitarian Crisis

Sunday, August 27, 2017, 10:11 AM

Economy

How Hurricane Harvey Could Cause Long-Term Devastation (jdargis)

The dearth of flood insurance policies makes the result obvious: Most people who lose homes or have them damaged in Harvey won’t have money to replace or repair them. There are a number of reasons why people might go without insurance. Flood protection is expensive, especially in at-risk areas—indeed, that’s how a flood insurance system should work. And although people in especially high-risk flood areas have to purchase flood insurance when they purchase homes as per NFIP guidelines, for people outside of those extreme-risk areas, lack of recent flooding can persuade many homeowners and renters from taking on the additional expense.

‘It’s a Slow Death’: The World’s Worst Humanitarian Crisis (tmn)

Like more than half of Yemenis, the family did not have immediate access to a working medical center, so Mr. Jayefi borrowed money from friends and relatives to take his daughter to the capital.

“We’re just waiting for doom or for a breakthrough from heaven,” he said.

Canada government giving migrants 'false hope' (tmn)

But in the first two weeks of August, more than 3,600 people crossed into the country from the US. As a result, processing and sheltering the migrants has put a strain on government resources.

Ms Rempel, who is in charge immigration issues in the Conservative shadow cabinet, said Mr Trudeau's Liberal party had no real plan in place to tackle the problem.

America Is on the Verge of Ratpocalypse (jdargis)

It’s no surprise that rats thrive in cities, where humans provide an abundance of food and shelter. But experts now agree that the weather is playing a role in these recent increases. Extreme summer heat and this past winter’s mild temperatures have created urban rat utopias.

Failure to Set Cost of Carbon Hampers Trump’s Effort to Expand Use of Fossil Fuels (jdargis)

In an email on Tuesday, he pointed to two recent court decisions. On Tuesday, a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC, must consider the impact of greenhouse gas emissions that will result from construction of three new interstate pipelines in the Southeast. The Sierra Club, other environmental groups and some affected landowners had challenged the commission’s environmental review of the project.

Is a 200-300 mile range enough for Tesla to break into electric trucking? (jdargis)

So if the report is true, would a truck with a range of 200-300 miles be enough to win entry into the freight trucking market? Possibly. A 2013 report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado notes that “trucks dominate the market today for freight shipments under 500 miles, which account for almost 80 percent of all domestic freight tonnage.” Freight that needs to travel 500 miles or more tends to be transported by rail, waterways, or pipeline, at least if you’re counting by tonnage (the Bureau of Transportation Statistics counts oil and gas pipeline deliveries as freight).

Lawn Guilt (LR)

All these insects, song birds, lizards, and small mammals have, likewise, made the lawn a prime location for raptors and coyotes, which have been quick to take advantage of the food chain reaction triggered by our damp spot. In fact, the coyotes denned so nearby this year that, for a month this spring, we had the daily pleasure of watching three tiny pups peering out at us from the sage. The lawn has also become an oasis for our girls. I suppose Hannah and Caroline did fine playing in the alkali-encrusted hardpan that existed here before I installed the lawn, but they now seem encouraged to play more games and do more handstands, not to mention enjoying the childhood rite of passage that entails running through a sprinkler after staining your tongue blue with popsicles.

Why Houston Isn't Ready For Harvey (jdargis)

How bad things get in Houston depends on where and how quickly the rain falls. But many are already drawing comparisons to 2001’s Tropical Storm Allison — the worst rainstorm to hit an American city in modern history. Allison dropped 40 inches of rain on the city in five days, killed nearly two dozen people and caused $5 billion in damage in the county that includes Houston. The map below shows how many homes, businesses, schools and other structures flooded. As you can see, a lot of flooded areas were outside the 100-year floodplain — the area the federal government says faces a 1 percent chance of flooding every year.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 8/25/17

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

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1 Comment

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
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countries facing weak growth should spend, Jackson Hole study

 

Debt-ridden countries facing weak growth should spend, Jackson Hole study argues

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LA Daily News-10 hours ago
Studies have found that student debt loads, rising income inequality and .... 1.7 million poorest Californians afford homes would cost $15 to $30 billion a year.

 

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