Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 6/30 - Good News Friday: Children Full Of Life, How To Save Your Nest Egg

Friday, June 30, 2017, 10:23 AM

This is Good News Friday, where we find some good economic, energy, and environmental news and share it with PP readers. Please send any positive news to [email protected] with subject header "Good News Friday." We will save and post weekly. Enjoy!

Economy

Children Full Of Life (richcabot)

Mr. Kanamori, a teacher of a 4th grade class, teaches his students not only how to be students, but how to live. He gives them lessons on teamwork, community, the importance of openness, how to cope, and the harm caused by bullying.

Rikers-bound defendants will have more time to post bail before getting locked up under new city legislation (sv)

Other bills passed Wednesday will require city jails to accept bail at all times, and release prisoners within three to five hours after it’s paid. And people who get arrested will be allowed to access their phones to find contact information for friends or families, and to access their other property in order to pay their own bail.

2 Tricks to Save Your Nest Egg From Cracking (Tiffany D.)

Developing rainy day savings can make a huge different in how a household survives the next economic downturn. And regardless of whether you think it’s coming tomorrow or a year from now, you can’t deny that there will be another recession.

Will you be ready?

Congress Passes Resolution Condemning LGBTQ Torture in Chechnya (sv)

“I’m proud that the House passed this strong resolution condemning the recent violence targeting gay men in Chechnya. Now, it’s critical that we do more to ensure those fleeing horrific violence can relocate somewhere safe,” LGBT Caucus Co-Chair Rep. David Cicilline, Democrat of Rhode Island, said. “This is an important step, but there is much more work left to be done.”

A Plan to Win Universal Health Care (sv)

In 2010, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, over one-fifth of all American health care spending was concentrated in 1 percent of patients, the sickest of the sick, and half of all spending was concentrated in 5 percent of patients. Contrast that to the least expensive 50 percent, who accounted for less than 3 percent of total medical costs.

A risk pool is the group of sick people who need care and the healthy people whose contributions are used to pay for it. The larger the risk pool, and the higher the percentage of healthy people within it, the more sustainable it becomes.

Car-charging company is on a tear, buying GE stations, securing investments (jdargis)

ChargePoint is the largest operator of an EV charging network in the world, supporting more than 36,000 independently owned charging spots. Last year, the company completed a pair of charging corridors from Boston to Washington, DC and from Portland, Oregon to San Diego. Charging stations were spaced 75 miles apart.

Ohio Air National Guard drops wind turbine plans for Camp Perry; birding groups declare victory (sv)

The planned construction site for the wind turbine was less than a mile from Lake Erie near Port Clinton, and situated at one of the largest confluences of migratory birds and bats in the world, said Michael Hutchins of the Bird Conservancy.

The lakeshore location is in the vicinity of numerous bald eagle nests and one of the most reliable staging grounds for such endangered species as Kirtland's warbler and piping plover.

Winners of the BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition (jdargis)

Entrants in the fourth annual BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition, put on by the California Academy of Sciences, were invited to “celebrate and illustrate the rich diversity of life on Earth, and inspire action to protect and conserve it through the power of imagery.”

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 6/29/17

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

4 Comments

pyranablade's picture
pyranablade
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 8 2010
Posts: 205
Neonicotinoids and Bees

One media outlet is paying attention to this:

 

http://www.npr.org/tags/336146185/neonicotinoids

 

Uncletommy's picture
Uncletommy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: May 3 2014
Posts: 476
Good news in the face of disaster??

Nice to see some communities have a sense of what's important. Again, it is apparent that many young people have a closer connection with what happens to our environment than the 401K crowd. Also nice to see some corporate input to the solution.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/donations-fly-in-after-spryfield-community-beehive-destroyed-1.4185006

thc0655's picture
thc0655
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 27 2010
Posts: 1517
Portland: America's Most Politically Violent City

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/06/30/how-liberal-portland-became-americas-most-politically-violent-city-215322

From its inception, Portland’s antifa contingent cloaked itself in anonymity; as a 2009 story in Portland’s Willamette Week noted, “Little is known publicly about Rose City Antifa.” And little seems to have changed in the decade since. Its unofficial uniform comprises blood-red and black bandanas and hoods, but the group doesn’t keep any official membership rolls, let alone share last names with anyone outside of its circle. “Why do we wear masks? Because [of] instances of antifa people [who] have been assassinated,” says David, a member of Rose City Antifa who, like all group members before him, declined to share his last name with POLITICO Magazine. The historical examples are not recent, but they are well-known in the group: Skinheads murdered a pair of anti-racist activists in Nevada in 1998, luring them to the desert outside Las Vegas, and local antifa have claimed that a 2010 incident in Portland—a shooting that left a self-described anti-racist skinhead in critical condition—was also politically motivated. 

For much of its existence, the group largely relied on shout-downs and public displays of force as their primary tactics. Recently they’ve added the cyber weapon of doxxing—exposing personal information such as addresses, places of employment, and dates of birth and schools, even if it means innocent families mistakenly targeted by antifa begin receiving threats. Such tactics have been “effective because they raise the cost of participation,” Stanislav Vysotsky, who researches political extremism with the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, told POLITICO Magazine

But now, for antifa, it’s not enough to simply outscream their opposition; rather, those far-right forces must, in a bizarre nod to the Bush Doctrine, be preemptively denied a voice from the outset. “We are unapologetic about the reality that fighting fascism at points requires physical militancy,” Rose City Antifa’s Facebook page reads. “Anti-fascism is, by nature, a form of self-defense: the goal of fascism is to exterminate the vast majority of human beings.” The group does not specify what physical militancy means, but their page makes clear that the definition includes “any means necessary.” 

“We’re seeing more people be like, ‘What’s antifa actually about? … Do you just like going and smashing Starbucks windows?’” David says. “And no, we don’t smash Starbucks windows—most of the time.” Or as one of the Rose City Antifa’s Facebook profile pictures read, “Set phasers to kill.”

***

Unsurprisingly, antifa’s assault-related tactics, despite their continued usage, have proven less than effective, according to those who closely follow political extremism in the U.S.

“It just makes [antifa] feel good—they think they made a point,” the ADL’s Pitcavage said. “But their tactics are counterproductive. They haven’t made any dent over the years with those tactics. … And it gives the white supremacists an unbelievable amount of publicity.” After all, a lack of anti-Nazi brawl-and-bash protests weren’t the reasons fascists rose to the fore in Germany and Italy—and there’s little reason to think that depriving neo-Nazis of their First Amendment rights will prove any more successful than the myriad pre-WWII street brawls that failed to slow the rise of fascism in Europe. Pitcavage points out that the far-right has been far deadlier, far more corrosive, than any American antifa contingents over the past few decades—but antifa tactics have only exacerbated and inflamed far-right rosters: “All the antifa tactics do is give extremists more attention, make extremists feel good, feel like warriors—and give them an opportunity to recruit.”

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 7 2007
Posts: 5570
Big Deal for Bees...and other insects
pyranablade wrote:

One media outlet is paying attention to this:

http://www.npr.org/tags/336146185/neonicotinoids

I talked about this exclusively in today's weekly video update.  It's a big deal.

Our 2015 report on neonics came to these same conclusions...now with extra science!

Suicide By Pesticide (this is the 2015 report)

And here's the weekly update:

 

 

 

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