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Daily Digest 2/28 - The Death Of A Gold Nation, U.S.-Russian Relations At Worst Since Cold War

Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 10:21 AM

Economy

Top Russian official: Our relationship with US at lowest point since Cold War (LesPhelps)

Kosachev's counterpart at the lower chamber of the Russian parliament, Alexei Pushkov, tweeted shortly after the announcement that "it was not Flynn who was targeted but relations with Russia."

Federal investigators in the U.S. have been looking into possible contacts between Trump advisers and Russia for months, along with Russia's role in political hacking during the campaign.

Welcome Aboard... But First US Marshals Will Scan Your Retina (LesPhelps)

Regulating immigration is not just about how people arrive, but about what they do once they have entered a country. It is about controlling how long people stay, where they travel, and what they do. Most of all, it means controlling whether or not and for whom they work (paid or unpaid), what they accept in financial remuneration, and what they must do to remain in employment, for as long as that is permitted. Yet this is not possible without controlling citizens and existing residents, who must be regulated, monitored and policed to make sure that they comply with immigration laws.

A Hole In The Head (Don R.)

Something like this has happened before in US history and it may be cyclical. The former Princeton University professor and President, Woodrow Wilson, dragged America into the First World War, which killed over 53,000 Americans (as many as Vietnam) in only eighteen months. He promulgated the Red Scare, a bit of hysteria not unlike the Race and Gender Phobia Accusation Fest on the Left today. Professor Wilson was also responsible for creating the Federal Reserve and all the mischief it has entailed, especially the loss of over 90 percent of the dollar’s value since 1913. Wilson, the perfect IYI of that day.

Quest For Nuggets: Heaven's Gate (DG)

Seriously, this is a 1-Trick Pony, but the one trick it reliably performs is quite serious.
Like all Technical Measures, it will reliably do the job it was designed for until market efficiencies reduce its effectiveness to failure. Since its methodology and composition will remain unpublished, that end result may be a very long way off.

One Shocking Chart On The Death Of A Gold Nation (Michael K.)

At that time, South African operations were the Cadillac of the gold business. But the last 10 years have changed a lot — with South African gold production steadily declining to just 4.5 million ounces in 2016. Good enough for just the #7 spot amongst producing nations globally.

In fact, as the chart below shows, even before South Africa lost its title as top gold mining nation in 2006, the industry had already been in decline for several years. Falling from a peak of 12.9 million ounces (402 tonnes) in 2001 — yellow line in the chart.

Petrolithium: The Next Big Innovation In Oil Tech (James S.)

By taking on brine water that often accompanies petroleum on its way to the surface, MGX and their processing partners PurLucid Treatment Solutions (whose past clientele included Shell [NYSE: RDS-A, RDS-B], Suncor [NYSE: SU] and Imperial Oil [NYSE: IMO] are set to rapidly separate out the most valuable minerals and salts from the brine. Among those materials is lithium carbonate, a key component of the green battery storage and vehicle sector.

The Slow Confiscation Of Everything (jdargis)

Climate change is a different prospect of calamity—not just elementally but morally different from nuclear exchange in a manner which has not been properly dealt with. The first difference is that it’s definitely happening. The second is that it’s not happening to everyone.

Sovereignty Under the Stars (jdargis)

In extragalactic astronomy, the farther away from Earth you look, the younger the universe you see. According to general relativity, light has a definite speed, so it takes time to get places. The sun, technically speaking, is the actual sun, rotating faraway in space, as it looked almost eight and a half minutes ago. Likewise, an image of the very edge of the expanding universe is how the universe looked at its birth.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 2/27/17

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

14 Comments

DennisC's picture
DennisC
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 19 2011
Posts: 310
Yippee ki-yay

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/02/27/storm-runoff-in-california-g...

"Hey you fellas, how 'bout some beans? You want some beans? Goin' through some mighty rough country tomorrow, you'd better have some beans." - The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

LesPhelps's picture
LesPhelps
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 30 2009
Posts: 788
Deja vu All Over Again
Quote:

The Slow Confiscation of Everything:

The planet, as we keep telling each other, is on fire. Might as well have a nice latte while we wait for the flames to slobber up our ankles.

 


Quote:

Block theory of the universe

Einstein's General Relativity view of time as a block which has "already happened", and we are merely "traveling through it", seeing snapshot after snapshot.
sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1889
Quick Peek at Grid Down Life

So what does life look like should the electrical grid suddenly cease to function?

The topic of many novels.  Here is a summary.  In my humble opinion, the sudden loss of refrigeration and water flowing from the tap will impact us most.

http://readynutrition.com/resources/6-totally-insane-things-that-will-ha...

  1. All commerce will cease. The ATMs won’t work, the banks won’t open.... For a while cash will be king, but if the crisis goes on for more than a few weeks, then people will view it as worthless. We’d be back to a barter economy in short order.
  2. Communications will shut down.  [Cell phone networks will fail.] ... communications with police, firefighters, and ambulance services will cease.   Many of the workers in these positions will try to soldier on, and keep doing the best job that they can for as long as they can. However, without ordinary citizens calling them to report crimes and emergencies, they’ll be helplessly watching their communities burn down around them. It won’t be long before they give up, ditch their posts, and return to their families.
  3. Without electricity, all forms of fuel that our society relies on will stop flowing. All of our vehicles will be dead in the water, and more importantly, the trucks will stop delivering food. The grocery stores will be stripped bare in hours, and will not be replenished for a long time. Even if you live in an area that is rich in agricultural resources, there may be no food to be had, since those farms rely on fertilizers and farming equipment that must be delivered by trucks.
  4. And of course many of those farms will lack water, as will your plumbing. For a couple of days after the power goes out, you’ll still have running water since water towers rely on gravity to feed the water to your home. However, electricity is required to clean that water and pump it into the tower. [Our town has 3 days water in a hilltop tower.  Then, no more tap water.]  Once it’s out, that means that you won’t be able to flush your toilet. So not only dehydration be a major threat, but without the ability to remove human waste or wash your hands, every community will face daunting sanitation problems.
  5. When the grocery stores are stripped bare, the pharmacies won’t be far behind. Millions of people who rely on life saving medications could die in the weeks and months that follow. But perhaps more shocking is what would happen to the people who aren’t using drugs that are immediately life saving. 13% of Americans are using opioid drugs, which are highly addictive and cause horrendous withdrawal symptoms. Another 13% of Americans are on antidepressants, and likewise, the withdrawal symptoms are pretty problematic. In other words, within a few weeks after the grid collapses, about 25% of your neighbors are going to be in an awful mental state.
  6. And finally, one of the most shocking things that people will have to deal with, is the lack of GPS. The GPS satellites will probably keep running, but eventually the devices that read those signals will give up the ghost. These days people are pretty reliant on GPS for directions, and there aren’t as many paper maps lying around. The average person is going to be utterly lost if the grid goes down.

In summary, law and order will break down at every level, and death will be around every corner. It’s one thing to grow up and live in an era that lacks electricity, but to be sent back to such a time on a moments notice would be one of the most challenging things that a person accustomed to modern amenities would ever face.

greered's picture
greered
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 25 2008
Posts: 6
Please drop the vulgarity

We are adults, not children and we don't use that language on this site.

 

 

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3159
?
greered wrote:

We are adults, not children and we don't use that language on this site.

?

Uncletommy's picture
Uncletommy
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: May 4 2014
Posts: 572
always have a backup

Can handle up to a 30' lift, if you're looking for back up.

WP2-Hand-Pump.jpg

http://www.watertiger.net/hand-pump/

Personally, I opt for a drop pipe and cylinder with sucker rods. Our 2 inch has delivered water for the last 35 years; 19' water table, 135' deep. I have a handle for the flywheel' if things were to get dicey. Solar panels would be stretched to run it, though.

The 19th century never looked so good. We may get there sooner than we all think.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1182
Uncletommy?

I'll meet yawl in the 19th century...bring  some cillins, aminoglycosides,and fluoroquinolones. May also need...I got the rest? 

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1182
Uncletommy?

I'll meet yawl in the 19th century...bring  some cillins, aminoglycosides,and fluoroquinolones. May also need...I got the rest? 

Uncletommy's picture
Uncletommy
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: May 4 2014
Posts: 572
I get my drugs off the pantry shelf or the root cellar,Robie.

Burns; try boiled potato peelings(aminoglycosides); good protein synthesis inhibitors.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2350410

During the Revolutionary period, gun shot wounds were packed with bread (usually growing a little mold, penicillin) which absorbed blood and serum and inhibited bacteria growth.

http://ipfactly.com/moldy-bread-was-once-used-to-treat-wounds/

 As for fluoroquinolones, I'm still working on that one. However, a Greek fraternity brother suggested I try a little Retsina wine (okay if you're Greek and you'd better be eating goat cheese and olives); much better than straight turpentine. He said that works great for colds and respiratory ills. Charles Dickens refers to it as tar water in Great Expectations. Probably a derivative of naptha (Moth balls). If that doesn't kill you, it will kill anything circulating within you. My great grandfather used Puff Ball spores to stop or slow down bleeding from cuts. My mother went ballistic when he used that on my scraped knees. I'm still alive. My psychological health is probably in question, however. Maybe that's why they call them - "farm-aceuticals". Oh, almost forgot - Witch Hazel. Cabinet is full now!

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1182
Bring that

knowledge and experience with you, the 19th century is waiting. I'm presupposing that is the century humanity will collapse to unless we overshoot collapse and go extinct. I've asked before the question,when we're we last sustainable? 

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1182
Derrick Jensen answered

the "when was humanity last sustainable", question. The Stone Age.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1182
oops

Double post

mntnhousepermi's picture
mntnhousepermi
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 19 2016
Posts: 159
last sustainable

All of humanity is too large to answer this, there have been many examples that were sustainable. Middle ages were quite sustainable, many tribes of the native American indians, China for a very, very long time before colonial powers forced open borders, same for a long period of Japan, various spots in Tibet until modern times. Egypt was stable and living within its means for thousands of years..... Pre-industrialization was when, and then some areas and times were exploitive ( cutting down all trees, etc...) while others were living sustainably.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1182
Good summary

Jensen, if i remember correctly, placed it around the time of civility. when civility became a descriptive value

sustainability lost value.

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