Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 9/8 - Dakota Access Pipeline Saga Turns Violent, The Future Of Oil Supply

Thursday, September 8, 2016, 10:06 AM

Economy

Chicago gangs no longer know or fear the police, and bodies pile up (Thomas C.)

"Daley thought the people in the city had gone mad. He did not know it was the gangs. The Black Gangster Disciples, the Vice Lords, it was all over drugs then.

"And he was thrilled," O'Connor said. "He was waving it at press conferences, at press conferences you probably attended. The analysis showed that some neighborhoods had the same crime rate they'd had in the 1950s, Sauganash, Edgebrook, Mount Greenwood, so Daley could say crime wasn't all over the city."

Coda in the Key of F2654hD4 (richcabot)

Exposure of the Diebold AccuVote system’s weakness is generally credited to Johns Hopkins University computer scientist Aviel Rubin and his colleagues, who in 2003 began analyzing the source code discovered by Harris. It’s useful to frame this story in terms of Rubin’s analysis of the Diebold source code.

Gold's Best Kept Secret (Tiffany D.)

Back in 2014, Newmont Mining slashed its quarterly 35 cents per share dividend by more than 90% and linked future payouts to the price of gold itself. The cut was the last straw for many investors, who bailed out of the stock and drove it from a 2014 high of $27 down to nearly $15 by the summer of 2015.

How Elizabeth Holmes' House Of Cards Came Tumbling Down (jdargis)

Shortly after reading the article, Carreyrou started investigating Theranos’s medical practices. As it turned out, there was an underside to Theranos’s story that had not been told—one that involved questionable lab procedures and results, among other things. Soon after Carreyrou began his reporting, David Boies, the superstar lawyer—and Theranos board member—who had taken on Bill Gates in the 1990s and represented Al Gore during the 2000 Florida recount case, visited the Journal newsroom for a five-hour meeting. Boies subsequently returned to the Journal to meet with the paper’s editor in chief, Gerard Baker. Eventually, on October 16, 2015, the Journal published the article: HOT STARTUP THERANOS HAS STRUGGLED WITH ITS BLOOD-TEST TECHNOLOGY.

On the Sidelines in Cash – PM Correction Over – and Fed Manipulations (GE Christenson)

The price action in metals may also be giving investors pause. Gold and silver were among the best performing assets for the first 6 months of the year. That means they’re moving from the perception of being cheap to expensive for some buyers. Others still wonder if the recent breakout in prices is the real deal – or whether it’s simply another short-term uptick in a continuing bear-market cycle.

What’s Really Going On With The OPEC Freeze? – Interview With Robin Mills (Josh O.)

Of course everyone is willing to freeze once they can’t increase production anymore, which makes it a bit meaningless. A freeze however depends on the time scale, because in the next 3-5 years the Iranians do want to increase production significantly. So we’re not talking about a long-term freeze here, it’s probably going to be a short-term one, giving prices an opportunity while inventories get drained.

Dakota Access Pipeline Saga Turns Violent (Josh O.)

Saturday’s clash began when a group of several hundred protestors gathered near construction crews on Saturday afternoon at a site close to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The demonstrators aimed to act as a human shield against the pipeline’s further development, after the removal of topsoil from a 150-feet wide and 2-mile long portion of land caused “devastating” damage to the tribe’s sacred lands.

People are almost completely ignoring a looming crisis for oil (Brandon)

However, in a major new research note, HSBC argues that soon we won't be worrying about there being too much supply and not enough demand, but rather, things will be the other way round soon enough, and that is going to cause huge problems.

In the report from HSBC staff Kim Fustier, Gordon Gray, Christoffer Gundersen, and Thomas Himboldt argue that given the finite nature of the physical amount of oil in the world, people should really be paying more attention to falling supply in the future, rather than oversupply right now.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 9/7/16

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

19 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
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US recession jitters stoke fears of impotent Fed and fiscal para

US recession jitters stoke fears of impotent Fed and fiscal paralysis

Telegraph.co.uk-18 hours ago
This is why former Fed chairman reluctantly prefers the alternative poison of negative interest rates, in extremis. US Federal Reserve The US Federal Reserve ...

BOJ deputy chief does not rule out going deeper on negative rates

The Japan Times-5 hours ago
Bank of Japan Deputy Gov. Hiroshi Nakaso said Thursday that expanding the central bank's negative interest rate policy is still a key tool that could be used to ...

BOJ's Nakaso says won't rule out deepening negative rates
Daily Mail-10 hours ago

 

South Koreas household debt inflates in August amid low interest rates

EconoTimes - ‎10 hours ago‎
Of the aggregate debts, mortgage loans extended by banks rose by 6.2 trillion won to 512.7 trillion won. The country's total household credit jumped 11.1 percent on-year to an all-time high of 1,257.3 trillion won as of end-June amid prolonged low ...

US corporate-bond sales pass US$1 trillion in record pace

The Straits Times-2 hours ago
And investors have flocked to the debt to escape US$11.7 trillion of bonds elsewhere that are trading at negative yields thanks to unprecedented stimulus from ...

Exclusive: Saudi Oger faces huge debt restructuring as rescue talks collap...

Reuters - ‎5 hours ago‎
The 15 billion riyals of loans equate to around two-thirds of the combined profits of all Saudi banks in the first half of 2016 - though the lenders' strong capital positions and low levels of non-performing loans would mean writing off this debt would ...

The Shell Game Behind a $43 Billion Market

Bloomberg-3 hours ago
Back in 2010, banks issued $46.6 billion of structured notes that were registered ... The Fed excluded structured notes from the category of TLAC-eligible debt ...

Nigel Farage: Ireland, if you think Apple is bad you ain't seen ...

Irish Times-6 hours ago
After the EU/ECB unfairly imposed 64 billion euro Frano-German bank debt on the Irish taxpayer in 2010, and Troika officials marched into the Irish ministry of ...

A federal solution to Chicago's public pension mess

Chicago Tribune-16 hours ago

According to the latest annual financial reports of Chicago's five major pension plans, we're looking at $35 billion in unfunded pensions. But that's using a more

Real cost of runaway housing market comes home to roost

Stuff.co.nz-8 hours ago
Housing costs compared to household income rose from 29 per cent in 2013, ... is skewed by pension payments, which have risen at a rate faster than inflation.

Report: Cost of health care in Bay State jumps to $8424 per person

Boston Herald - ‎Sep 7, 2016‎
The cost of health care for every man, woman and child in Massachusetts grew to a whopping $8,424 in 2015 — a nearly 4 percent increase from the previous year — and skyrocketing prescription drug costs accounted for a third of that growth, according ...

 

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Re: Coda in the key of

Re: Coda in the key of F2654hD4

While I appreciate this article, for computer scientists, it's restating the obvious.  Ask any competent programmer what he or she thinks of the security and integrity of DRE systems and they're likely to break down in a fit of laughter.

The crux of the issue is contained in Rubin's point #4: "The fact that a vote appeared in the confirmation screen (front end) was no guarantee that the vote was recorded and tabulated (back end)."

The only secure way that a voter can know that his or her ballot is accurate is to directly record the intended vote on the ballot itself.  The ballot then becomes part of the permanent record of the election.  In all cases where tabulations are suspect, the original ballots can then be manually tallied and compared to the tabulated results.

IMO, all election results should be made available on the internet from the precinct level up, the tallies being posted before the ballots leave the precinct.  The results of random precincts should be verified by hand tallies, and the precincts to be so verified should not be known to *anyone* before the tallies are published.

The sad fact of the matter is that election fraud is always a concern, given what's at stake.  Direct recording of votes on permanent ballots that are verified by the voter before being tallied is an essential safeguard at the lowest level of the process.  Redundancy is then required to safeguard the various levels of tabulation, which is why publishing the results on the internet before the ballots leave the polling stations is a must.  Once the ballots leave the polling stations, there are chain-of-custody issues that are generally beyond the public's view.  The results must be publicly known, and, if there are suspicions of tabulation fraud, verified by hand count before those chain-of-custody issues come into play.

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OMG, a President capable of thinking

https://climatecrocks.com/2016/09/08/obama-on-terrifying-climate-threat/...

Quote:

In an exclusive interview on his legacy, President Obama speaks to The Times’s Mark Landler and Coral Davenport on climate change while visiting Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

Cross posted on Climate Change thread

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Re OMG a president that can think

Doug,

I believe you are confusing the ability to think with the ability to speak.  This hagioraphic interview displays his eloquence in spinning his legacy and his core belief in all things regulatory and mediated symbolism as remedy, but does not impress me with any profound insights on solutions or even understanding of global warming which is but several of the critical feedback loops of our unchecked industrial society in our current age of limits. 

There is a clue to the structural problem and remedy within his dissembling though, as he takes credit for reducing carbon emissions to a greater degree than even if he hadn't failed in Copenhagen and with Cap and Trade.    He is of course referring to the diminished emissions which are a direct function of the ongoing recession/depression (certainly an inconvenient narrative to credit)  

However therein lies the crux of the matter.  Economic activity in an an industrialized society that is dependent on continued growth by it's very structure is the driver of all forms of industrial pollution including CO2 emissions.  Reduce activity and you slow CO2 output. 

  The notion that you can regulate away the bad energy and replace it with 21st Century clean alt energy and continue to run and "grow' our economy'  betrays a complete lack of awareness of the laws of thermodynamics and energy density.  More importantly it provides the impetus for delaying dealing with the reality of the problem which represents  time and energy we can't afford to squander on this happy fiction.  Furthermore the notion that you can mediate this on a global basis with disparate interests belies an understanding of fundamental game theory and behavioral economics.

Nowhere do I see Obama calling for conservation, or educating people as to unsustainablity of growth as economic model.  Or asking for behavioral changes that will be necessary. 

Nor do I see him reigning in the 'carbon foot print of our empire and our military legions.  I do see him facilitating the very same humanitarian crisis and migrations he cautions may result from global warming though.

So forgive me if I don't credit Obama,  well rested and waxing eloquent after his umpteenth sojurn to the South Pacific on Golf Force one with his fleet of  what I can only assume are 'solar powered' jumbo jets hauling his  entourage and bullet proof limos, for any real progress or insight on this subject.  Give me Jimmy Carter in a cardigan with a lecture on the thermostat any day.

To be fair, there is nothing that any titular leader within the context of our current system can do short of educating people to the real nature of the problem.   Which is the issue I have with the implicit message of  "OMG a president capable of thinking"    ie  that the problem can be solved within the context of our current system and the 'right' president will be able to address this.   

My hopes for a president are much more limited.  I hope they will not instigate a thermonuclear war, as industrial society breaks around us. Just as I hope that industrial society will cease to function before it has finished off the biosphere.

 

mememonkey

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Eleventy thumbs up!
mememonkey wrote:

Doug,

I believe you are confusing the ability to think with the ability to speak.  This hagioraphic interview displays his eloquence in spinning his legacy and his core belief in all things regulatory and mediated symbolism as remedy, but does not impress me with any profound insights on solutions or even understanding of global warming which is but several of the critical feedback loops of our unchecked industrial society in our current age of limits. 

There is a clue to the structural problem and remedy within his dissembling though, as he takes credit for reducing carbon emissions to a greater degree than even if he hadn't failed in Copenhagen and with Cap and Trade.    He is of course referring to the diminished emissions which are a direct function of the ongoing recession/depression (certainly an inconvenient narrative to credit)  

However therein lies the crux of the matter.  Economic activity in an an industrialized society that is dependent on continued growth by it's very structure is the driver of all forms of industrial pollution including CO2 emissions.  Reduce activity and you slow CO2 output. 

  The notion that you can regulate away the bad energy and replace it with 21st Century clean alt energy and continue to run and "grow' our economy'  betrays a complete lack of awareness of the laws of thermodynamics and energy density.  More importantly it provides the impetus for delaying dealing with the reality of the problem which represents  time and energy we can't afford to squander on this happy fiction.  Furthermore the notion that you can mediate this on a global basis with disparate interests belies an understanding of fundamental game theory and behavioral economics.

Nowhere do I see Obama calling for conservation, or educating people as to unsustainablity of growth as economic model.  Or asking for behavioral changes that will be necessary. 

Nor do I see him reigning in the 'carbon foot print of our empire and our military legions.  I do see him facilitating the very same humanitarian crisis and migrations he cautions may result from global warming though.

So forgive me if I don't credit Obama,  well rested and waxing eloquent after his umpteenth sojurn to the South Pacific on Golf Force one with his fleet of  what I can only assume are 'solar powered' jumbo jets hauling his  entourage and bullet proof limos, for any real progress or insight on this subject.  Give me Jimmy Carter in a cardigan with a lecture on the thermostat any day.

To be fair, there is nothing that any titular leader within the context of our current system can do short of educating people to the real nature of the problem.   Which is the issue I have with the implicit message of  "OMG a president capable of thinking"    ie  that the problem can be solved within the context of our current system and the 'right' president will be able to address this.   

My hopes for a president are much more limited.  I hope they will not instigate a thermonuclear war, as industrial society breaks around us. Just as I hope that industrial society will cease to function before it has finished off the biosphere.

mememonkey

My name is Chris Martenson, and I endorse this message.

yes

smiley

Seriously.  that was well stated, top to bottom.  Pure awesomeness.

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Our Political Candidates on Global Warming:

For anyone interested on where our political candidates stand on denying climate change Mother Jones and Scientific American are great places to start.Some of those beliefs are shocking.If you want to go even further you can find out how many of them voted.A quick hint-Some just love the Koch brothers...

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deleted

deleted

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Sorry Doug

I am sorry you felt compelled to delete your post.Not even points scored for the president bringing the discussion forward...This president regularly picks up the phone to MIT to educate himself on al things science and tech.....

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OK, OK

I took liberties with the tag line.  I largely agree with your summation with some notable exceptions.

Quote:

I believe you are confusing the ability to think with the ability to speak.

I suggest that clear speaking is a very strong indicator of clear thinking.

Obama noted that he is frightened by the information provided by his science advisor.  I think that's an appropriate response to the threat of climate change.  That said, it is a huge problem that for a wide range of reasons, not the least of which is politics, will not be addressed immediately and comprehensively.  I agree with you that Jimmy Carter's approach of educating the public is always the right thing to do.  But, where did that get him?  Among the first things Reagan did when he moved into the White House was tear down the solar panels and encourage the auto industry to build SUVs, damn the consequences.  That put the fear of god into any politician who might suggest that Americans should cut back on their lifestyles for the greater good.  What's the word they use?  Oh yeh, Communism.

Of course Obama did not recognize the limits to growth you describe.  But, as far as I know, almost no one in government or the private sector will acknowledge those limits.  That's a political reality that has to be recognized.  Cap and trade not only failed in Copenhagen, it more importantly, from the American perspective, failed in Congress.  To this date, there are no more than a very few Republicans in Congress who even acknowledge anthropogenic climate change.  That's another political reality that has to be recognized.

Quote:

So forgive me if I don't credit Obama,  well rested and waxing eloquent after his umpteenth sojurn to the South Pacific on Golf Force one with his fleet of  what I can only assume are 'solar powered' jumbo jets hauling his  entourage and bullet proof limos, for any real progress or insight on this subject.

Cheap shot.  In my living memory just about every President since Eisenhower, who also took much criticism for playing golf, has been hammered  by the political opposition for taking too much time off.  And, I would suggest speaking to Homeland Security and the Secret Service about security arrangements for the current and probably all future Presidents.

Like it or not, any plausible solution to climate change (and the numerous other environmental threats facing the world) will have to be incremental in nature.  If Obama or any other President tells the American people the true nature of the threats, he/she will be unmercifully battered by their political opponents, much as Obama already is for his rather meager efforts in that direction. Or look at the rhetoric (much like what you level at Obama) that Al Gore has endured since he started telling the truth.  I sincerely think Obama is doing what he believes to be politically possible given the current environment in DC.  And, who can argue with that?  It's a toxic sludge down there.

Given the many unknowns still surrounding our understanding of climate change, incremental changes may work to limit the damage.  We can't stop it at this point, so we need to do what's possible to prevent the worst.  Do you have a more workable solution?

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Alarms Sound on Headlong Rush Into Fringes of Emerging Junk

Alarms Sound on Headlong Rush Into Fringes of Emerging Junk

Bloomberg-5 hours ago
That compares to 1.6 percent on 10-Year U.S. Treasuries. ... Economic surprises including renewed signs of a slowdown in China's economy or a downturn in ...
 

Deutsche Bank: Bond Investors Are About to Get Crushed as a New ...

Bloomberg-2 hours ago
Japan's sovereign debt market is embroiled in its biggest rout in 13 years with the 10-year benchmark climbing to minus 0.025 percent on Friday (compared with ...
 

Bank of Japan Risk: Running Out of Bonds to Buy

Wall Street Journal-Sep 8, 2016
At that rate, analysts say, banks could run out of government debt to sell within ... borrowing from the central bank, which leaves ¥64.7 trillion available for sale.

Mexico Faces Austere 2017 Budget on Lower Oil Revenue

Nasdaq-15 hours ago
The primary surplus, which excludes debt payments, is projected to be equal to ... Budget revenue is expected to rise 0.4% in real terms from 2016 to 4.3 trillion ...

Treasury to Sell $152 Billion of Debt

Wall Street Journal-22 hours ago
The Treasury Department will auction $152 billion in securities next week, comprising $80 billion in new debt and $72 billion in previously sold debt. Details (all ...

San Diego facing new pension debt

The San Diego Union-Tribune-16 hours ago
SAN DIEGO — A recent $380 million spike in San Diego's pension debt is forcing ... liability, which the new study increased from $2 billion to nearly $2.4 billion.
 

Chicago Moves to Increase Utility Taxes to Bolster Pension

Bloomberg-21 hours ago
That failure has left the city with $34 billion of retirement debt across its four funds. The strain of the unfunded liabilities pressures its budget and led Moody's ...

Editorial: State's unfunded pension liability raises concerns

Fredericksburg.com-12 hours ago
VIRGINIA'S retirement system for public employees has more than $68 billion in long-term pension liabilities. That's a lot of money. And the state doesn't have ...

 

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thinking presidents

I think Obama is very intelligent, and thoughtful, and an excellent speaker.  It was a real relief to have him after Bush II.

But in my book he screwed the pooch by letting those bankers off scot-free in 2009 when he had practically infinite political capital to prosecute them for their criminal activity as well as nationalize their failed operations rather than coddle them the way he did.

And of course there are all the wars, and the increased surveillance.  For all his brainpower, he ended up making very similar decisions to Bush.  Problem is, I expected more from him than I expected out of Bush II, so he was a bigger disappointment.

Even given all the gridlock, for the things he actually seemed to have control over, he picked crony capitalism, coddling his contributors, and war over real free market solutions & rule of law.  He just made the wrong calls in a number of really important areas.

Just my sense.

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I prefer this from Lowkey regarding the black dude

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What vision do you serve

When dealing with a social segment that embraces lying as a standard mode of operation, you just watch what they do.

What vision do they serve?  Just watch what they do.

That is all.  What did they actually do?

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Not always so easy to watch what they do
sand_puppy wrote:

When dealing with a social segment that embraces lying as a standard mode of operation, you just watch what they do.

It isn't so easy to watch what they do anymore. They influence congress to change laws favorably to their causes. Instead of calling the bill "Intrusive Unwarranted Surveillance of Innocent Americans Act" they call it "The Patriot Act." Worse, the bills are so cumbersome and loaded with pork barrel language that it needs to be passed to see what's in it. Worse still is when an innocuous looking clause says to delete a word like "not" in another unrelated law. For instance, "Banks shall not be allowed to invest contrary to advice given to clients."

Of course, it eventually comes out. By then, it is too late to change it. Oops! What are you going to do?

Grover

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Intelligent Solutions

Doug,

When I first watched that interview, I was going to write a scathing comment. Mememonkey beat me to it. He did an excellent job! I figured there was no reason to pile on. Then, you wrote this response to Mememonkey.

Doug wrote:

Obama noted that he is frightened by the information provided by his science advisor.  I think that's an appropriate response to the threat of climate change.  That said, it is a huge problem that for a wide range of reasons, not the least of which is politics, will not be addressed immediately and comprehensively.

Fear is an appropriate reaction but not an appropriate response. An intelligent response requires thought and consideration of consequences. All I heard is more of the statist dream of regulating everything to death. I actually agree with you that it will not be addressed. The consequences of addressing climate change are worse than the consequences of not addressing it.

Doug wrote:

I agree with you that Jimmy Carter's approach of educating the public is always the right thing to do.  But, where did that get him?  Among the first things Reagan did when he moved into the White House was tear down the solar panels and encourage the auto industry to build SUVs, damn the consequences.

I actually follow Jimmy Carter's advice here. I keep my house thermostat at 55°F during the winter and wear sweaters inside the house. We have a woodstove in the front room that keeps it a bit warmer.

Jimmy Carter made a few political blunders. He hired Volcker to head the Fed knowing Volcker's intention to kill inflation by raising interest rates. His intention was to kill inflation so he would have an easier second term. He also had the Iran hostage crisis on his watch. His military attempt to rescue the hostages failed. As a result, Reagan successfully painted Carter as a weakling. Because the voters bought the message, could Reagan really keep Carter's trappings without looking like a weakling himself?

Reagan inherited a national debt of less than $1 trillion. By the end of his term, the debt was nearly tripled. (Talk about austerity!) He is one of the most loved and revered presidents we have had. Do you expect any president to abandon his techniques? Look at Obama's debt run up. Look at W's. [DaveF, can you find historic US debt numbers and associate overall increase/decrease by each president? A semi-log graph would be very interesting.]

Doug wrote:

That put the fear of god into any politician who might suggest that Americans should cut back on their lifestyles for the greater good.

Doug, you continually surprise/disappoint me. You note that there is political pain to opposing a popular president. Yet, you won't acknowledge the same forces exist outside politics. When a reporter asks Yellen uncomfortable questions, he gets fired. (I can't remember his name.) Do you expect other reporters to learn the hazards or to fall on their swords for the greater good? Do you expect engineers to step forth and don the mantle of "conspiracy theorist" or just accept the political reality of 9/11?

Doug wrote:

What's the word they use?  Oh yeh, Communism.

You chastised Jim H for using the word "sarcasm" instead of "satire" on another thread. I don't know what the appropriate word is here, but it certainly isn't "communism." Communism is a statist's dream. There isn't any dissent to worry about. Dissenters will be dealt with conspicuously and permanently in order to thwart further dissent. Another hallmark of communism is a 2 class system with leaders and serfs. Leaders do whatever they want and serfs pay the price while living in fear.

Doug wrote:

Cheap shot.

[Is that a golf shot with a Mexican accent?] I agree here. When I was working, I'd get so immersed in my projects that I'd actually dream about them. I came up with my best solutions while asleep. The president is on call 24/7/365/4. As long as the business of being president is handled, I'm satisfied. It does raise eyebrows when so much time is spent on the golf course.

Doug wrote:

Like it or not, any plausible solution to climate change (and the numerous other environmental threats facing the world) will have to be incremental in nature.

That's quite a declaration! If climate change is truly a predicament, there isn't any solution. The best we can hope for is to avoid the nastiest outcomes. An intelligent person will consider the consequences of actions/nonactions before actually proceeding. A statist who wants more control will work to convince the underlings that ceding power to the state (for whatever excuse is convenient) is in their best interest. Convince enough weak minded individuals and the political process goes that way. Didn't Rahm Immanuel say, "never let a crisis go to waste."

Doug wrote:

If Obama or any other President tells the American people the true nature of the threats, he/she will be unmercifully battered by their political opponents, much as Obama already is for his rather meager efforts in that direction. Or look at the rhetoric (much like what you level at Obama) that Al Gore has endured since he started telling the truth.  I sincerely think Obama is doing what he believes to be politically possible given the current environment in DC.  And, who can argue with that?  It's a toxic sludge down there.

Yes. Politicians always get battered unmercifully by political opponents. It is what they do. You only notice it when it is against one of your political idols. Al Gore is really an excellent example of the statist thinking. Has he taken the Jimmy Carter approach and metaphorically donned a sweater? Or, has he continued his Gulfstream lifestyle and mitigated it by planting trees that theoretically suck up his emitted carbon dioxide? If the rest of the world followed Al Gore's example, the world would be so filled with trees that we wouldn't have any space to grow food. That makes him a hypocrite in my book.

Obama is a lame duck. It doesn't matter if he shows the courage of his conscience. He has no consequence either way. Could it be that he is just trying to feather his post-presidency bed? How can you tell that he isn't doing so? After all, past presidents have done that.

Doug wrote:

Given the many unknowns still surrounding our understanding of climate change, incremental changes may work to limit the damage.  We can't stop it at this point, so we need to do what's possible to prevent the worst.  Do you have a more workable solution?

I've said in the past that I'm allergic to partial solutions. If a total solution can be crafted from a series of parts of solutions, we have a solution. I can't remember if you've ever said that climate change is a predicament, not a problem. Mark Cochrane has. I also don't remember that you ever corrected him for that "gross" error. Because a situation can't be both a problem and a predicament at the same time, I have to conclude that you consider it a predicament. As such, partial solutions only delay the inevitable.

Every second the world human population increases by slightly less than 3. That doesn't sound like much until you do the math. In a year, there are another 80 - 90 million mouths to feed. Most of them are born in areas that have a significantly lower standard of living than found in the USA. Who can blame them for wanting what we take for granted? At best, your baby steps will only delay the inevitable. If the real problem is too many humans on the planet, then delaying the inevitable makes the problem worse.

I can't see a society wide solution as a possibility. Until someone can convince me that there is a potential complete solution, I will continue to point out the obvious. That said, individuals can still make choices to better their chances of surviving climate change (if the rest of our machinations survive that long.) The best strategy would be to make choices that limit exposure to all foreseeable negative outcomes. Climate change advocates boldly state that sea levels will rise. If so, does it make sense to settle just above current sea level? The statist's solution is to build a wall to keep the sea at bay. Of course, they can only pay for it by raising taxes. Anyone in the jurisdiction will be taxed to fund the sea wall. Can they build a 200' wall to keep all future sea level rises at bay? That's unaffordable. Any "solution" will be a compromise between what is required and what can be sold to the tax donkeys. Why would you want to settle there?

My solution is for individual solutions to the situation. Most will perish. Research as best you can and make your choices. The 3 most important aspects are location, location, and location. Then, time will roll the dice. Perhaps you won't lose as much if you choose wisely.

Grover

Luke Moffat's picture
Luke Moffat
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 25 2014
Posts: 384
Mother Earth

Grover,

I'm starting to wonder if Homo Sapien is even deserving of planet Earth. I mean she's beautiful, unique, diverse. She can be both serene and volatile. She provides the platform for us to wonder, dream, love and understand. How many of us truly appreciate her? Instead we exploit her, ruthlessly exterminate her diversity and then worry when she doesn't give us 'enough'. Who are we to carry out such atrocities and make such complaints?

Sometimes I wonder whether the best thing we can do is record the key concepts of what human civilisation has uncovered and put them into storage for a more responsible species to understand and develop. Maybe the form of sentience which survives will not be biological in nature and therefore won't consume the organic wealth of Mother Earth to grow. A question was posed on Our Finite World sometime this week, "Can Earth survive the Human Condition?"

It's been making me think. What's the old saying, "you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone."

Luke

Grover's picture
Grover
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 16 2011
Posts: 879
Big Yellow Taxi

Luke,

We may not be deserving of planet Earth, but we will eventually get what we deserve. Earth literally does not care if we survive or not. Life will adapt and move forth. There may be spots that aren't habitable for millennia, but life will learn to adapt to those conditions as well. Earth will survive the human condition.

Grover

 

ejhr's picture
ejhr
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 28 2014
Posts: 35
thinking presidents

"I'm Sorry Dave, I can't do that" Cue 2001movie. No the presidents are all bought and sold by their "benefactors".You don't get the gig without them and they want their investment to pay off. Yes, Obama is intelligent, certainly intelligent enough to want to not be cast adrift when his term finishes, by treading on his benefactors' toes now.

IMO, he was always compromised. His appointment of Larry Summers to Treasury was a sell out straight away and showed his rhetoric was a false one. Like all democrats he has to show a veneer of caring for the less well off end of the population, but it's just a veneer. Otherwise they all wear neo-liberal shoes.

As it is, not even one politician understands economics or we wouldn't be seeing such damaging neo-liberal policies being so popular with the well off end of the population.

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