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    Daily Digest 8/30 – Good News Friday: Helping Children Learn To Eat Well, The Milky Way In A Single Photo

    by Daily Digest

    Friday, August 30, 2019, 8:17 AM

This is Good News Friday, where we find some good economic, energy, and environmental news and share it with PP readers. Please send any positive news to [email protected] with subject header "Good News Friday." We will save and post weekly. Enjoy!

Economy

A major study pinpointed the 5 habits of people who don’t feel lonely (tmn)

Those who say they work just the right amount are least likely to be lonely – the loneliness score of those who work more than desired increases by just over three points, while those who work less than desired showed a 6-point increase in loneliness. Not surprisingly, those who report working less than desired are less likely to report having feelings associated with being less lonely (e.g., feeling outgoing and friendly, there are people you can talk to, etc.), compared to those who work more than desired.

The Joys of Being a Late Tech Adopter (jdargis)

In other words, by waiting and opting for a previous-generation model, I get to enjoy a fast, long-lasting watch that tracks my workouts and shows my calendar notifications, among other perks, for a steep discount.

Helping Children Learn to Eat Well (tmn)

“I never use the word dieting, and I never use the word weight loss, because of the negative connotations,” Dr. Taveras said. “But I can recommend that a family switch from sugar-sweetened beverages to water, or replace processed, calorically dense foods with fruits and vegetables — is that a diet? It’s a nutrition plan.”

The Detroit Zoo plans to be entirely powered by renewable energy by 2021 (Thomas R.)

DTE expects several other wind-only sites to come online by late 2020, to cover larger businesses like the Detroit Zoo. They will enable the zoo to offset the 7,425 metric tons of carbon dioxide carbon dioxide it releases each year.

DTE provides electricity to 2.2 million customers in southeastern Michigan. It launched the green energy offset program in the spring of 2017, and aims to reduce its carbon emissions across the board 80% by 2040.

Do plastic bag taxes or bans curb waste? 400 cities and states tried it out. (tmn)

While a straightforward ban may seem like the most effective way to stop people from using plastic, researchers and consultants suggest another strategy is working better: a tax on all non-reusable bags, which may or may not be combined with an outright ban on some plastic.

Jupiter’s new moons get their official names (Sparky1)

Five of Jupiter’s recently discovered moons have been officially named.

The Entire Plane of the Milky Way Captured in a Single Photo (Thomas R.)

Is it possible to capture the entire plane of our galaxy in a single image? Yes, but not in one exposure — and it took some planning to do it in two. The top part of the featured image is the night sky above Lebanon, north of the equator, taken in 2017 June. The image was taken at a time when the central band of the Milky Way Galaxy passed directly overhead. The bottom half was similarly captured six months later in latitude-opposite Chile, south of Earth’s equator. Each image therefore captured the night sky in exactly the opposite direction of the other, when fully half the Galactic plane was visible.

Meet the pilot who defied KGB orders to drop flowers on Baltic Way human chain (newsbuoy)

“There was an injunction banning all flights that day, including regular flights by Aeroflot, the Soviet airline. But as I had not received any order to stay on the ground that day, I felt I was not doing anything very bad,” Lithuanian pilot Tamošiūnas recalled, smirking.

The night before the Baltic Way human chain, he and another pilot, Kazimieras Šalčius, painted the tails of their AN-2 aircraft, replacing the USSR flag with the colours of the Lithuanian one: yellow, green and red.

Hubble’s New Portrait of Jupiter (jdargis)

The bands are created by differences in the thickness and height of the ammonia ice clouds. The colorful bands, which flow in opposite directions at various latitudes, result from different atmospheric pressures. Lighter bands rise higher and have thicker clouds than the darker bands.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 8/27/19

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

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One Comment

  • Fri, Aug 30, 2019 - 9:32am

    #1

    thc0655

    Status Platinum Member (Online)

    Joined: Apr 27 2010

    Posts: 1486

    2+

    Good news (for the humans, at least). Must’ve been a Front Sight grad

    https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/anchorage/2019/08/27/a-moose-charged-his-3-year-old-son-in-an-anchorage-park-he-shot-and-killed-it/

    Matthew Sanders and his 3-year-old son, Huxley, were walking on a narrow trail on the edge of Anchorage’s Kincaid Park on Thursday when the boy turned a corner and ran into two moose in tall grass.

    It was the kind of heart-pounding moment encountered by many hikers and cyclists in one of Anchorage’s biggest, most-used patches of wild land.

    But things turned quickly. Sanders yelled. The boy froze. The cow moose charged.

    The Anchorage father says he was able to get between his son and the moose and pull a .44 Magnum from a chest holster. By then the moose was so close “all I could see was its nostrils and hairs,” Sanders later recounted in a Facebook post.

    Sanders says he shot the moose, which ran into a thicket of horsetails and cow parsnip at the trail’s edge.

    Then cow charged again, according to Sanders. This time the father, holding his 3-year-old, fired three shots…

    Department biologists visited the scene of the moose kill Thursday and interviewed Sanders about what happened. The moose, determined to be about 2-years-old, was butchered for meat, which will be donated to a family in need through a Fish and Game program.

    The incident seems to amount to a valid defense of life and property kill, the only legal reason a person can kill a moose in a city park, Battle said.

    Incidents like this are a reminder that moose are unpredictable, and not just during the sensitive spring calving season and aggressive fall rut, Battle said.

    “You can never tell what a moose just went through, before you had contact with it,” he said. “You can’t count on that moose acting the same as all the other moose you’ve encountered recently.”

    The father and son encountered the wrong moose at the wrong moment, Battle said.

    A moose may be sick, or have encountered a predator, have been chased by a dog, he said. If something has a moose “ramped up,” it can react with sudden aggression, he said…

    On Thursday morning, Sanders said he’d heard about bears on the trails that seemed unperturbed by human contact. At the last minute he decided to pack a .44 Magnum instead of bear spray. It was the first time he’d ever carried a weapon on that trail, he said.

    He and his son were making “lots of noise” when he stopped to pull a piece of gum out of his pocket. That’s when the boy walked slightly ahead and encountered the moose, he said.

    Huxley, the 3-year-old, was shaken by what happened.

    “We had to start trying to talk about guns, gun safety,” Sanders said. “I took him the next day to go into the park, but before the woodline he got super scared. His eyes were up, looking around.”

    Since then the boy has gotten comfortable in the woods again, Sanders said.

    Biologists have heard of an “average to above-average” number of human-moose encounters in the Anchorage area this year, according to Battle.

    It has been a “startlingly low” year for human-bear encounters, Battle said. He isn’t sure why.

    If there’s a lesson to be learned from Sanders’ experience Thursday, it’s that moose are everywhere — and their behavior is impossible to predict with accuracy, Battle said.

    Sanders said his big lesson is about being prepared.

    “Wildlife, you never know what they’re going to do,” he said.

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