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    Daily Digest 5/24 – Good News Friday: Disaster Relief Package Approved, How To Save 1M People From A Cyclone

    by Daily Digest

    Friday, May 24, 2019, 7:14 AM

This is Good News Friday, where we find some good economic, energy, and environmental news and share it with PP readers. Please send any positive news to [email protected] with subject header "Good News Friday." We will save and post weekly. Enjoy!

Economy

Senate overwhelmingly approves $19.1 billion disaster relief package (TS)

The compromise measure would provide disaster relief for hard-hit states ravaged by tornadoes, flooding, hurricanes and wildfires in various parts of the country and is supported by Congressional Democrats and Republicans.

The Four Factors Behind Newark’s Education Turnaround (tmn)

Another form of school choice is just as popular: Newark magnet schools. Unlike charters, Newark’s magnets have restrictive admissions requirements, yet they enroll 37 percent of Newark students. This diversified landscape — magnets, traditionals, charters — encourages innovation and, at long last, the beginnings of collaboration: a new report from the New Jersey Charter School Association profiles Uncommon’s North Star Academy, which, with a nudge from Superintendent Cerf, opened its professional development sessions to district teachers.

Oregon teachers are walking out, forcing 600 schools to close. But they’re not demanding raises (sv)

“This is historic,” Larson told a sea of red-shirted teachers, parents and students at a riverfront rally in downtown Portland. “This is what we came here for today — is to make sure that we fund our schools.”

Participants carried signs with messages such as “Class size matters” and “Teachers just wanna have fund$.”

Mary Anning, the greatest fossilist the world ever knew (tmn)

How did Mary Anning, as a young woman living in an era when women weren’t allowed to vote, go to university, or belong to scientific organizations, eventually get credit for her scientific discoveries? This BBC Ideas stop-motion animation about her difficult life was made with sand and stones from Anning’s beach by animator Anna Humphries.

Nevada could become 15th state to buck Electoral College in favor of popular vote (jdargis)

So far, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington state and the District of Columbia have signed up for the pact. The number of electoral votes between the group amounts to 189.

New York aims to fight climate change by creating green union jobs (jdargis)

The offshore wind turbines are at the heart of the climate plan the unions developed, but it also calls for installing more solar panels, improving and expanding mass transit and renovating buildings to make them more energy efficient. The unions’ plan talks repeatedly of a “just transition” so that workers who lose good-paying jobs when, for instance, coal-fired power plants close could be trained for good-paying new renewable energy jobs.

California defies Trump to ban pesticide linked to childhood brain damage (sv)

“This is a very important and pivotal moment,” said Angel Garcia, the chair of the Coalition Advocating for Pesticide Safety, who has worked with families affected by chlorpyrifos. “It sends the message to communities that they are starting to be heard … People will now have a safer future.”

Washington is 1st state to allow composting of human bodies (tmn)

Cemeteries across the country are allowed to offer natural or “green” burials, by which people are buried in biodegradable shrouds or caskets without being embalmed. Composting could be a good option in cities where cemetery land is scarce, Pedersen said. Spade described it as “the urban equivalent to natural burial.”

How Do You Save a Million People From a Cyclone? Ask a Poor State in India (tmn)

But as of early Saturday, mass casualties seemed to have been averted. While the full extent of the destruction remained unclear, only a few deaths had been reported, in what appeared to be an early-warning success story.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 5/23/19

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

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13 Comments

  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 10:24am

    #1

    thc0655

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 27 2010

    Posts: 1466

    3+

    This might be good news depending on your political views and whether yo live in Seattle

    https://www.kuow.org/stories/why-they-left-seattle-police-in-their-own-blistering-words

    “Hyper-aggressive oversight.” “Non-supportive city government.” “No backing from city, OPA and community.” “An increasingly spineless legal system.” These are the parting shots of Seattle police officers explaining why they left in the past year.

    In dozens of unredacted exit interviews over the past year, departing Seattle police officers provided their agency with their blunt take on the political climate in Seattle, including the statement, “City Council sucks.” Another officer observed of the Police Department, “everybody seems unhappy.”

    But many officers praised their leadership and the training, opportunities and relationships they formed within the department. Some said they’d gladly return to SPD “if the city can right itself.”

    One said, “The amount of training we receive here is no doubt the best in the country.” Another answered that “coffee” was the biggest factor helping morale.

    Eighteen officers said they left SPD to join neighboring law enforcement agencies, including the King County Sheriff’s Office, as well as police departments in Tacoma, Renton, Kent and Puyallup. Another 11 officers were retiring.

    In their interviews, obtained through a public records request, many officers blamed their departures on rhetoric from the Seattle City Council, city politics in general, and what they viewed as biased media, and an overzealous Office of Police Accountability. Some also cited a hostile public.

    Officer Marty Malone, who left Seattle police for the King County Sheriff’s Office, said, “It is hard sometimes to stay positive when some days it feels like some people of Seattle don’t want you there.”

    I wonder if there’s any common cause to explain what’s going on in Seattle including police leaving in large numbers, the swelling numbers of homeless, the needles and human excrement on the streets, a rising number of medieval diseases, and declining economic conditions? I have my theories, and it ain’t good news.

    ”Happy Hunger Games! And may the odds be ever in your favor.”

     

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 3:50pm

    #2
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 224

    1+

    Police morale

    Interesting to read how disaffected Seattle officers can find work in adjoining jurisdictions. I don’t know how unhappy Australian police service (they’re not officially called forces any more) officers deal with this kind of thing. We have one police service per state and territory, and one federal. To go to work for an adjoining jurisdiction would in most cases involve an interstate relocation and all the accompanying domestic dislocation.

    Not good to hear of the poisonous political climate in Seattle evidently coming from the top, not from the bottom somewhere. Is this unique to Seattle?

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 4:43pm

    Reply to #2

    thc0655

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 27 2010

    Posts: 1466

    2+

    Not unique to Seattle. They’re just a recent arrival to the “party.”

    That’s what my reference was to fictional Det. John McClain’s famous line in the movie “Die Hard,” ‘Welcome to the party, pal!’

    Having just retired from the Philadelphia PD, I can say we have had the exact same problems. I retired a year early just to get out of that toxic atmosphere. Name any big city in America (all run exclusively by Democrats for decades with no interruption) and the dynamic is the same: Chicago, Detroit, NYC, San Francisco, LA, Baltimore, etc.

    Transferring from a big city department to a neighboring smaller town can only happen for a very small number of disaffected officers. There are very positions and many big city cops vying for them. Most officers are trapped if they want to remain in the law enforcement profession.

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 5:32pm

    Reply to #2

    thc0655

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 27 2010

    Posts: 1466

    2+

    You don’t have to wait long for another example to be publicized

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05-24/san-francisco-expensive-shit-covered-cesspool-marked-crime-and-depression

    Thanks to high-crime, squalor, relaxed drug laws and an excruciatingly high cost of living, San Francisco has become one of the nation’s most depressing places to live, according to the City-Journal‘s Erica Sandberg.

    And it’s not just the shit-covered streets which require highly-compensated“poop patrollers” to try and keep up with the fecal fiasco, or the thousands of used drug needles littering the ground, or the shocking number of aggressive homeless people terrifying touristsSan Francisco is a bastion of property crime – in fact, it’s the worst city in the nation when it comes to burglary, larceny, shoplifting and vandalism, according to the report…

    According to many in law enforcement, the crime wave is being fueled by a 2014 law, Proposition 47, which downgraded possession of illegal narcotics for personal use as well as theft of items below $950 in value from felonies to misdemeanors…

    Meanwhile, rampant low-level crimes are intensifying the death of retail in San Francisco.

    Landmark Mission District stores are shuttering, citing theft and lack of security. In April, CVS closed two pharmacies that had been ravaged by constant shoplifting. Mom-and-pop businesses, wracked by so-called minor losses, find it impossible to survive. Empty storefronts dot once-vibrant neighborhoods. –City-Journal

    “Property and low-level crimes shrink the space for everyday people and enlarge them for the people committing them,” according to criminal prosecutor Nancy Tung, who is running for District Attorney in the 2019 election. “If we continue down this path, we will see more people leave San Francisco.”

    Crime hits the poor the hardest

    “In the Tenderloin we have vulnerable populations—people of color, the most children, the second-highest concentration of elders, and they are held hostage by drug dealers and theft, and the city tells them these crimes are not that bad,” says Tung. “We are failing to protect them. The police do a good job, because the criminals are caught, only to be released back on the streets over and over.”…

    “The everyday wear and tear on your psyche gets to you,” said David Young – board president of his South Market building which suffered four window smashings in a six-month period. “When we walk out the door, we know that there is a 100 percent chance we’ll see someone on drugs, in various states of undress, blood on sidewalks, and discarded sharps. These are crimes no one in city hall seems to care about. When you say something about it, you’re called a fascist.

    San Francisco used to be an amazing place to live, says Young. “Now people look at the city as an abscess … The cost of housing compared to the quality of life is way off. Everyone is talking about it. Crime has been ignored for so long, and it’s gotten so huge. Serial repeat offenders have no problem making bail, especially drug dealers, as they see it as the cost of doing business.”

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 6:37pm

    Reply to #2

    Chris Martenson

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 07 2007

    Posts: 4647

    4+

    Voting with their feet

    It’s not a perfect alignment to your observations thc0655, but darn close.

    People are voting themselves away from many Democratic paradises for some reason.

    It’s not a perfect alignment, but the UHaul index has a tale to tell.

    For some reason, on average, people want to move away from all that tax and spend goodness.  There has to be some sort of a reason?

    Needs a lot more study to find out why people prefer to spend 1/2 to 1/4 as much on taxes while receiving a lot more at the same time.

    🙂

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 7:17pm

    #3
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 224

    Opinion on relaxed drug laws & crime rates

    Thanks, thc0655. We’ve recently legislated to permit the medical use of cannabis and derivatives, but there is much apparent reluctance on the part of those governing us to permit it to be used. A variety of red tape barriers has been put up, in spite of the legislation, to make medical cannabis difficult or impossible to use. Cynics say it’s because the pharmaceutical industry wants to control the supply and take the profits.

    There is talk also of legalising the growing and use of cannabis for personal use. Proponents claim that in the US states where this has been permitted, crime rates decline because there is less or no incentive to steal to to fund an addiction.

    Leaving aside the multitude of other nastier and more addictive substances, do you have any experience of the consequences of cannabis used for medicinal purposes only?

     

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 7:37pm

    Reply to #3

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3150

    3+

    cannabis - medicinal purposes

    I have an example.  My Mom was dying from cancer – her partner at the time was, to put it bluntly, a pothead.  (They were a very unlikely combination – she got “dizzy” after a small glass of wine).  Anyhow, she was in pain, and he suggested using CBD as the painkiller instead of the morphine they had given us.  So we got a supply from the local pot store.  They delivered.  It cost us a few hundred bucks.

    Mom was definitely a bit woozy during her last few months, but she was conscious and able to participate in conversation and family life up until two days before she passed.  The hospice nurse, who would come by periodically to check on her, finally asked us, “so what exactly are you guys doing?”  We told her – with a little trepidation – CBD.  She responded that she knew where Mom was in terms of her progression, and that all her other patients at this state were unconscious from morphine due to the pain.  Mom was the only one who was awake.

    So from my perspective, medical marijuana helped me to spend meaningful time with my mother in the last few months of her life.  Priceless?  You bet.  Whenever I think back to that time, I give thanks to her pothead boyfriend for making it all happen, and to the legalization efforts in California.

    Its funny how things work out sometimes.

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 8:07pm

    #4

    lambertad

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 31 2013

    Posts: 179

    2+

    CBD, CYP2C19 inhibition

    I’ve got a personal story.

    Had a 54 year old lady in my office the other day. She was using CBD oil for chronic low back pain. Quite effectively actually, she has been able to stop her narcotics that she was using previously. Either it’s effective, or an effective placebo, we need randomized controlled trials to know.

    Anyway, she was on Plavix for stroke prevention. CBD inhibits CYP2C19 a liver enzyme that converts the pro-drug of Plavix into the active form. She didn’t know that and apparently others didn’t either. She had another stroke on CBD. Ooops. I’m checking some pharmacogenomics to see if she is just a poor metabolizer of Plavix or if we can blame the CBD. Perhaps she was destined to have another stroke even if the Plavix was working, who knows. I just think a lot of this stuff people don’t know about and think, oh, it’s just CBD.

    If you’re spending money on CBD, check out the FDA website, they’ve done random sampling of CBD oil and some of them contain no actual CBD – placebo or actual effect is again the question –  https://www.fda.gov/news-events/public-health-focus/warning-letters-and-test-results-cannabidiol-related-products

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 8:23pm

    #5
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 224

    2+

    A cannabis story

    I’m interested in this topic because the wife of a Canberra City Farm colleague recently died of a brain tumour after a protracted illness. During her illness he and she did a great deal of research into treatments for pain and nausea. She gave up the conventional treatments of chemo- and radiotherapy as these failed to shrink the tumour and did not enhance her quality of life.

    She got much relief, and at times the only relief, from treatment using cannabis extracts. It allowed her to pass away at home, in the company of her family, without pain or suffering, but being aware of everyone almost to the last.

    I was able to watch as her condition declined from vigorous health via the dreadful side-effects of the chemo- and radiotherapies, until the final day when she had come to the Farm for some open air, became very ill and her husband took her home. The next time we met was at the funeral.

    My colleague’s research has told him:

    1. One can freely eat cannabis leaf and bud with no ill effects. People juice it to relieve the pain of Crohn’s disease. It tastes terrible. The plant is in fact a herb with hundreds of different organic compounds. Hemp, marijuana and cannabis are all the same plant: Cannabis sp., mainly sativa and indica. The cannabis plant contains two main phytocannabinoids, CBDA and THCA, along with anything up to 111 others (https://www.hempgazette.com/medical-cannabis/cannabinoids-list/). It is the heating of THCA that turns it into THC that causes the hallucinogenic effects. Hence in its raw plant form, you cannot get ‘high’ from eating cannabis plant material. For cannabis to be classified as hemp, it needs to have a THC content of less than 0.5% (NSW DPI). The difference between medicinal cannabis and hemp is the THC level.

    2. The effects of growing cannabis in a garden have nothing to do with children inhaling cannabis smoke. For teenage children to smoke cannabis they would need expertise in the areas of harvesting and drying.

    3. The uses of Cannabis sp. range from building materials, fabric manufacture and biodegradable plastics replacement, through to a wide range of medicinal uses, some of which mainstream medicine is slowly discovering.

    4. Some of the US states have fully legalised cannabis, and they find that the “forbidden fruit” effect wears off — it loses its attraction as something to try by virtue of being illegal. The statistics show teenage use of cannabis dropping. Once cannabis is freely available, it will no longer be attractive to thieves — one objective of the legislation is to make the black market unprofitable by allowing it to be freely grown.

    5. While the conventional medical establishment has yet to come to terms with prescribing cannabis, its use by my colleague’s wife was tolerated within the ACT hospital system. In fact, medicinal cannabis is now legal, in part thanks to a Change.org campaign by a Lucy Haslam on behalf of her son Daniel. However, the pharmaceutical industry has for whatever reasons convinced politicians to create red tape to prevent treatments being administered.

    A lot to consider there, and this debate seems to go on and on.

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  • Fri, May 24, 2019 - 11:09pm

    #6

    AKGrannyWGrit

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 06 2011

    Posts: 459

    3+

    CBD

    Pot is legal in Alaska and CBD has become a mainstay for ever so many with arthritis, pain and the aches of old age.  Bath balms, salves, massage creams, sprays and oils etc. It’s now in beauty shops, pet stores and farmers markets, practically everywhere and people love it.  I give CBD to my aging dog and it improves her activity level, reduces her limp and I don’t think it’s a placebo effect.

    Not interested in reading the FDA website as I have doubts about their agenda and truth and government don’t go together.

    Before pot was legalized up here my brother flew to Anchorage so he could be in hospice and spend his final days with me.  No doubt some TSA person rubbed their hands together and excitedly called my brother up to the ticket agent counter to gleefully demand why he had illicit drugs in his luggage?  Over 6 feet and then down to about 110 pounds he said “because I am dying”  looking at his gaunt figure they immediately knew he was telling the truth.  Upon landing my brother discovered his pot had disappeared as well as his Doctor prescribed fentenal patches.  The joke was TSA was having a party with his drugs.  The good news was Hospice was quick to get my brother appropriate pain meds.

    I regularly hear stories about how CBD is helping people.  We didn’t know when pot was legalized that ever so many seniors would benefit from pain relief.  If it were known nationwide pot would be legal nationally tomorrow.  Who would have thought that an adult could actually choose for themselves whether to ingest something that helps them and without a Doctors prescription.  Medical heresy!

    AKGrannyWGrit

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  • Sat, May 25, 2019 - 5:26am

    #7

    lambertad

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 31 2013

    Posts: 179

    1+

    Save you money

    Granny,

    I’m trying to save you and everyone else money in the form on not buying CBD oil that contains no CBD. That was the purpose of the think. The FDA has literally sent 3 letters in 2019 to people selling fake CBD online to tell them to stop. Hope you’re not wasting your money on fake CBD. But if you are, please let me supply you, will ya? I need to develop some extra income streams for the coming crash.

    Just FYI, Kratom is an plant from SE Asia that in low doses can work as an anxiolytic/antidepressant and at higher doses has opiate like effects. It’s legal. But I had a lady in the ICU with status epileptics following ingestion of this substance who also happened to have manganese deposition in the brain. We sent samples of the krater to a local lab to get tested and it was high in manganese. Hopefully that case report will be published. Seizures and deaths have been reported with Kratom.

    I have no problem with people putting whatever they want to in their own bodies. I am in favor of people having information to make an informed decisions, i.e. go to the FDA website and make sure whatever you are buying actually contains CBD!

    BTW, I think we’re all in favor of science here, are we not? The true test of CBD is a randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled trial of CBD vs placebo vs. other medication. Scientists can argue about inclusion/exclusion criteria and study design until the sun sets. Some people think prayers help their arthritis, want to explain that one to me? Additionally, studies would be beneficial to know the recommended dosing, i.e. if you take 4 drops per day you’re more likely to get XXX problem, but if you take 3 drops per day, you hit the sweet spot. Just like Tylenol, great pain medication, but if you consistently take >3-4grams per day you may end up with liver problems – Ooops, who knew studies could be valuable.

    ezlxq

    You don’t understand the knock on effect of allowing people to bring in whatever they want to into the hospital and take it for whatever problem they want to. A question came to our department about allowing people to bring their home ‘CBD oil’ into the hospital for seizure control (not including epidiolex for LGS/Dravet syndrome). We simply said what’s the published scientific evidence in favor of it. Show me the DATA, please. There’s none, except for epidiolex, in the two conditions listed above. Let’s suppose heroin is legal in the future. Someone comes in and says they need their heroin for their seizures. Of course there would be no evidence in support of heroin, so do you let them use their heroin in the hospital? If so, who doses it, the patient? If the patient dies in the hospital, who is to blame if the patient is dosing their own heroin. How do you manage pain in patients taking heroin from their own supply combined with whatever you are giving them in the hospital?

    I certainly respect that health system as being forward looking in regards to CBD, but it’s not just “pharmaceutical red tape”, there are knock on effects from these decisions.

     

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  • Sat, May 25, 2019 - 5:43am

    Reply to #7

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3150

    prayers helping

    Lambertad-

    I’m all for measuring and assessing quality.  consumerlab.com does this very thing.  I’m a big fan.

    As for prayers – of course prayers help.  There’s this thing which you well know about called the placebo effect, which is so strong, it defines the very structure we use for drug trials.  Drug companies have to spend lots of money to make it go away.  The placebo effect is the elephant in the room.  If we could simply learn to control it, talk about a low-cost medication with no side effects.  Unfortunately, its not patentable, so nobody cares.

    Belief IS power.  How construct a technique so that normal people can make use of it consciously?  That’s the holy grail.  So to speak.

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  • Sat, May 25, 2019 - 6:49am

    #8

    AKGrannyWGrit

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 06 2011

    Posts: 459

    1+

    Lambertad

    Thank you for taking the time to respond. I do understand your need for data and control in an institutional setting.  From my perspective I have watched people and their healthcare experiences and by and large it can be summed up to “have a problem – pop a pill”.  I have been a caregiver for 3 family members that have died and believe the choice to use pot and CBD provides for a more comfortable experience.

    As for CBD many of the shops will have their products tested.  There is too much competition out there to just say trust me, they would rather show you, brag how great their product is and and then charge a lot.  Buying online certainly would be a gamble.  The consumer should, if concerned about quality ask the business for a copy of their test results.  Funny that we are supposed to just trust the pharmaceutical industry that all their meds are trustworthy.  I read an article recently, actually  I think its a book now, anyway a great deal of Meds in our country come from China.  And they may not be as reputable as people think.

    There is a May 10, 2019 NBC news article titled “Tainted drugs: Ex-FDA inspector warns of dangers in U.S. meds made in China

    Here is the video.

    Personally, I know a young woman who, with her husband has opened several pot shops, has had her product tested and can give statistical values of the percentages of THC and CBD.  There is a great deal of science that goes into a legitimate pot business. I have ever so much more confidence in the derivative of a natural plant than a pharmaceutical medication made in China.  Perhaps blind faith isn’t or shouldn’t be A good practice in any case with regards to medicating ourselves.

    AKGrannyWGrit

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