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    Daily Digest 11/30 – Microsoft files patent to record and score meetings on body language, The Fed Effort to Save Midsize Firms Isn’t Working

    by Daily Digest

    Monday, November 30, 2020, 9:49 AM

Economy

Gold & The Great Reset: What’s Next For Money, Markets & Bitcoin (w/ Mike Maloney)

The composition of the US dollar, including what it is backed by, has been replaced many times throughout America’s history. And another replacement is currently underway, warns monetary expert Mike Maloney.

After President Nixon fully severed its ties to gold, our government leaders have increasingly relied on increasing the currency supply to paper over (quite literally) today’s problems at the expense of the dollar’s purchasing power tomorrow.

Moral Decay Leads To Collapse (t_pierson)

A very strong case can be made that America is now a moral cesspool. Consider just three cases: Jeffrey Epstein, the CEO of Pfizer and JPMorgan Chase.

Sadly, Epstein is the epitome of America’s elite: getting away with abusing children for years, if not decades; when finally caught a few years ago, escaping with a legal wrist-slap; acquiring a fortune of $200 million without creating any jobs, innovations or value; buying his way into the good graces of Harvard, MIT and a seemingly endless parade of celebrities, politicians, scientists, etc.

Microsoft files patent to record and score meetings on body language

Technology giant Microsoft has filed a patent for a system to monitor employees’ body language and facial expressions during work meetings and give the events a “quality score”.

A filing suggests it could be deployed in real-world meetings or online virtual get-togethers. It envisions rooms being packed with sensors to monitor the participants, which could raise privacy concerns. Microsoft is already under fire over a separate “productivity-score” tool.

Zoom Censorship of Palestine Seminars Sparks Fight Over Academic Freedom (newsbuoy)

Few companies have benefited from the coronavirus pandemic as much as Zoom, the online conferencing platform that has become a ubiquitous substitute for in-person interaction, work, and school. But a fight over Zoom’s right to censor speech is now brewing across the academic world, after the company shut down a seminar at San Francisco State University earlier this year over the participation of Palestinian activist Leila Khaled. Last month, Zoom continued its crackdown and canceled several online events organized at other universities that did not include Khaled herself but were critical of Zoom’s censorship of her.

Is my pension ruined if a retail empire crumbles?

When you work for a company, you are offered membership of a pension scheme, into which the employer makes a contribution and you add to via your pay.

If that businesses collapses, then the contributions stop. A new owner may take on the pension scheme, or – in many cases – certain types of pension scheme go into a rescue scheme called the Pension Protection Fund (PPF).

Covid-19: NZ company on hunt for drug treatments to help fight off virus (Downunder_Bound)

A New Zealand company has found 11 drugs that show promise in fighting the Covid-19 virus, and while it’s early days, it has begun rapid planning for clinical trials.

Avondale-based Koru Lifescience is testing already registered drugs to see if any could be useful to help people infected with the virus fight it off quicker, with less damage.  Chief executive Akhil Jain said while there were other New Zealand researchers working on a potential vaccine, his company’s project was the only one he knew of in the country working on treatments for Covid-19.

The Fed Effort to Save Midsize Firms Isn’t Working, and Here’s Why

It sounded like a great idea back in April. With the economy getting hammered by Covid-19, the Federal Reserve hatched a bold plan to rescue thousands of midsize companies that were falling into a gap between government aid programs.

Using its magic printing press, the U.S. central bank would take $75 billion appropriated by Congress and turn it into as much as $600 billion in loans to companies damaged by the pandemic.

Australia’s Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine choice questioned as experts highlight ‘shaky’ science (Downunder_Bound)

On Monday night Australian time, the AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine candidate, one of the Covid-19 vaccines the Australian Government committed to in a multi-billion-dollar deal, released its first interim results from its phase 3 trials.

At first glance the results were lauded, with the company claiming one dosing option provided 90 percent protection against Covid-19.

Energy

OPEC Faces Seismic Demand Split as Cartel Plots Next Move (Baker)

(Bloomberg) — As OPEC+ ministers gather virtually this week, the city that traditionally hosts their meetings will be locked down. Vienna’s Christmas markets will be closed, the famous Ringstrasse boulevard silent. For oil ministers, the scene should urge caution.

But while the Austrian capital provides a dramatic example of how the second wave of the pandemic is shutting down economies in Europe and the U.S., the global picture is more nuanced.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Weekly Market Commentary

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the “3 Es.”

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One Comment

  • Tue, Dec 01, 2020 - 1:02pm

    #1
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 398

    2

    Real threat of Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine to profits?

    This was opined recently by an MD on the Automatic Earth:

    One potentially good thing about the Oxford-Astra-Zeneca vaccine is that it is not a messenger RNA, genetic engineering “vaccine”, but a more traditional adenovirus-vector based vaccine, as is Russian Sputnik-V. It will also be freely shared technology, which makes it a threat to profits, so a media target.

    Is this really what is going on? Or is the science truly unsound? I've got to the stage where I don't trust anybody.

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