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    Daily Digest 1/9 – U.S. Healthcare Spending Highest Among Developed Countries, A Decade of Negative Rates?

    by saxplayer00o1

    Wednesday, January 9, 2019, 7:28 AM

Economy

US health care spending highest among developed countries

The paper finds that the U.S. remains an outlier in terms of per capita health care spending, which was $9,892 in 2016. That amount was about 25 percent higher than second-place Switzerland’s $7,919. It was also 108 percent higher than Canada’s $4,753, and 145 percent higher than the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) median of $4,033. And it was more than double the $4,559 the U.S. spent per capita on health care in 2000 — the year whose data the researchers analyzed for a 2003 study.

Police and fire pension fund slashes retirees’ insurance, impacting 8,000 Ohio families

The examples are frightening. Kevin’s prescriptions used to cost $50 a month. Now they cost $265. Diana’s previous monthly cost was $70, now it has jumped to an eye-popping $4,165 a month. The deductible on their old plan was $750. Under the new coverage, it is $6,700 with an $8,000 out of pocket, four-times the previous one.

LA Watchdog’s 2019 Wish List for City Hall

But our City is in a world of hurt as its finances are a mess: an annual budget that is already $50-$100 million in the red; $10 billion of deferred maintenance on our lunar cratered streets and broken sidewalks, our parks and their bathrooms, our urban forest, and the rest of the deteriorating infrastructure; unfunded pension liabilities approaching $20 billion (66% funded); and a Structural Deficit of $1 billion a year for at least the next four years.

Holiday debt could take years to pay off, study concludes

The average household is carrying a $6,929 balance month to month and coughing up about $1,140 a year in interest, according to NerdWallet.

ECB rate hike now unlikely before mid-2020, money markets bet

Data on Tuesday showed German industrial output unexpectedly fell in November, raising concern that Europe’s powerhouse economy may have slipped into a technical recession in the fourth quarter of 2018 after contracting in the third.

A Decade of Negative Rates? Denmark May Be the First to Try It

Not until 2021 at the earliest will Danes have a chance to see positive rates again, according to Danske Bank. The country’s policy rate first dropped below zero in 2012.

Draghi Will Be Passing on Baton With ECB in Populist Crosshairs

The economy is slowing again and nationalists across the bloc are challenging the principles of European integration, so the contest adds an extra layer of uncertainty as the ECB seeks to withdraw the crisis-era stimulus that’s kept interest rates at record lows.

How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation (tmn)

That realization recast my recent struggles: Why can’t I get this mundane stuff done? Because I’m burned out. Why am I burned out? Because I’ve internalized the idea that I should be working all the time. Why have I internalized that idea? Because everything and everyone in my life has reinforced it — explicitly and implicitly — since I was young. Life has always been hard, but many millennials are unequipped to deal with the particular ways in which it’s become hard for us.

Let’s do follow the climate money! (thc0655)

Billionaire and potential presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg gave the Sierra Club $110 million in a six-year period to fund its campaign against coal-generated electricity. Chesapeake Energy gave the Club $26 million in three years to promote natural gas and attack coal. Ten wealthy liberal foundations gave another $51 million over eight years to the Club and other environmentalist groups to battle coal.

Over a 12-year period, the Environmental Protection Agency gave its 15 Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee members $181 million in grants – and in exchange received quick rubberstamp approvals of various air quality rules. It paid the American Lung Association $20 million to support its regulations.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the PM Daily Market Commentary: 1/8/19

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@peakprosperity.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the “3 Es.”

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20 Comments

  • Wed, Jan 09, 2019 - 7:35am

    #1

    saxplayer00o1

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 30 2009

    Posts: 2922

    Fitch warns of possible downgrade to US AAA credit rating if shu

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    If people take the time to look at that you can see debt levels moving higher, you … Fitch had said in a recent report that its sovereign credit view of the world’s .

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  • Wed, Jan 09, 2019 - 1:50pm

    #2

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3082

    vaccines & autism

    Sheryl Atkisson reports: in some cases, vaccines can cause autism.  How does she know this?
    She has the affidavit of a former government expert witness in the “vaccine court.”  Read the following affidavit:
    https://sharylattkisson.com/2019/01/06/dr-andrew-zimmermans-full-affidavit-on-alleged-link-between-vaccines-and-autism-that-u-s-govt-covered-up/

    Dr. Zimmerman declined our interview request and referred us to his sworn affidavit. It says: On June 15, 2007, he took aside the Department of Justice—or DOJ lawyers he worked for defending vaccines in vaccine court. He told them that he’d discovered “exceptions in which vaccinations could cause autism.” “I explained that in a subset of children, vaccine induced fever and immune stimulation did cause regressive brain disease with features of autism spectrum disorder.”
    Kennedy: This panicked the two DOJ attorneys and they immediately fired Zimmerman. That was on a Friday and over the weekend they called Zimmerman and said his services would no longer be needed…

     

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  • Wed, Jan 09, 2019 - 5:18pm

    #3

    Matt Holbert

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 03 2008

    Posts: 66

    Freaky weather forecasting

    The weather service (NOAA) can no longer forecast the weather. According to weather forecasts (NOAA) a few hours ago, Spokane was supposed to have highs in the 40’s today and have several days of partial sunshine the next few days. Instead, we’ll have a high temp today of 34 F or so and the current forecast is no sunshine in the forecast for the next few days. They can no longer forecast — at least here in Spokane — the weather.
    Curious to know if other PP folks are experiencing forecasts that are way off the mark?

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  • Wed, Jan 09, 2019 - 5:21pm

    #4

    lambertad

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 31 2013

    Posts: 173

    Parsing words

    We parse words of the FED officials all of the time. Why does Dr. Zimmerman use the carefully crafted word “features” before ” of austism spectrum disorder”?. Does it cause autism or does it just cause features of autism and the reader/viewer is left to extrapolate the rest in their mind? 
    I’m not defending the pharma industry, what BS coverup may have taken place, the fact that we pay for damages from pharma vaccines and they don’t, etc., I’m not defending any of that. I’m just wondering, why the use of the word “features of” and not simply “causes autism spectrum disorders”. 
    The case study patient from the video clearly has autism, he doesn’t have “features” of autism. 
    As a side note, I work in neurology and we find new antibodies to old syndromes all the time. One of the best known recently is NMDA-R antibody encephalitis popularized in the movie “brain on fire”. The first case reports were in I believe 2008 or 2009. My mentor saw 1 case in his residency, I’ve seen more cases in 1 year than he did in his entire training. New evidence is constantly changing medicine, so I don’t get too comfortable with what I think I know. That being said, new evidence could change the landscape for the vaccine-autism debate and it’s unfortunate the .gov isn’t funding the research. If we knew more, perhaps there may be a way to risk stratify kids who are at extremely high risk of developing “features” of autism from vaccines and then to protect those kids by NOT giving them vaccines, but by vaccinating all of the kids who are at very low risk of developing these features. 
     
     

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  • Wed, Jan 09, 2019 - 8:35pm

    #5

    LesPhelps

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 30 2009

    Posts: 456

    Why US Health Care Costs Are Out Of Control

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  • Thu, Jan 10, 2019 - 11:51am

    Reply to #4

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3082

    risk stratify kids

    lambertad-

    …. If we knew more, perhaps there may be a way to risk stratify kids who are at extremely high risk of developing “features” of autism from vaccines and then to protect those kids by NOT giving them vaccines, but by vaccinating all of the kids who are at very low risk of developing these features.

    That was my thought too.  If we knew more, we could keep the useful aspects of vaccination while avoiding injury to the kids who fell into the high risk group.
    But if the system focuses on pretending the problem doesn’t exist, it is impossible to fund research on how to avoid running into said problem.
    If ISIS had done this to our children, we’d be bombing another six middle eastern nations in about ten seconds flat.  But because Big Pharma did it, and is continuing to do it, making tons of money in the process, it all just gets covered up.
    I really don’t blame the parents who, when faced with all this systemic government & Big Pharma dishonesty, simply choose to opt out, because they cannot properly assess the risk to their kids.

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  • Thu, Jan 10, 2019 - 2:06pm

    #6

    sand_puppy

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 1815

    Delayed Vaccination Schedules

    I am certainly no expert in this contentious field.  But for several years I studied with the functional medicine group and read and breathed this groups writing, seminars and attitudes.  I bring forward several opinions from this group.  I’m mostly coming from memory.
    Martha Herbert, pediatric neurologist specializing in autism–yes, occasionally devastating whole body global inflammatory events occur affecting multiple organ systems.  When the primary organ system is the undeveloped brain of a young child, a very poorly defined syndrome of brain dysfunction can emerge that we loosely call “autism.”   Autism has no firm or fixed diagnostic criteria and no genetic marker or blood tests.  It is a loose collection of “autism like features” of severe brain dysfunction.   Many autistic children show global signs of inflammation in many different organ systems.  Many factors can trigger, contribute and combine in a poorly understood mix of pathophysiology:  genetics, infection, toxins, dysbiosis, EMF? — and vaccinations given to young children are sometimes one of the triggers.
    Kenneth Bock, a functional medicine pediatrician, recommends a delayed vaccination schedule.  The most significant part is delaying the age of vaccinations and separating the MMR into its 3 components (measles, mumps and rubella) and giving these components 6 months to 1 year apart.  Then draw antibody titers and only repeating the vaccination in those documented to not have adequate antibody response. Bock’s website is here.  Please note that Bock, like most FM docs, recognizes real disease prevention benefit of vaccination–this is not a “religious anti-vaxxer” group.
    The FM faculty seem to believe that an occasional (but rare) global inflammatory event can be triggered by the MMR.  In a slightly older child with a more developed brain, at least this reaction wont cause autism.  Delayed schedules are almost always recommended by this group.
    Bock’s most recent recomendation starts with the measles vaccination, as a single agent, at 15 months of age — though other FM docs recommend waiting until age 3.
    Sydney Baker is another prominent name in the “biomedical treatment approach to autism” movement. (DAN–Defeat Autism Now is one organization of some 30 physician / biomedical scientist and hundreds of parents of autistic children.)  Sydney Baker wrote:  Clinical Assessment Options for Children with Autism and Related Disorders: A Biomedical Approach.)
    ———–
    A special note on Andrew Wakefield:  Many of the functional medicine doctors that I personally know and respect know Dr Andy Wakefield personally and have spent long hours hashing over his findings and their implications.  They have very high regard for his intelligence, sincerity and absolutely believe in his authenticity and integrity.  
    It is the general opinion of the functional medicine faculty that Andy was on to something with his discovery of the live attenuated vaccine-strain measles virus (not a native strain of measles virus) in the severely inflammed colon cells of a small group of 12 children who became autistic shortly after MMR.
    Since then, this finding has been disputed and the journal that published it has retracted it.  I am not sophisticated enough in the basic biological sciences to evaluate the strength of evidence from the virologist and immunologists viewpoints.  But, I am sophisticated enought to recognize when a coordinated character assassination operation is being run.  (Think of the response to weapons inspector Scott Ritter reporting that Saddam did not have WMDs in 2002 or Julian Assange after the DNC leaks.)
    I do not personally have definitive answers.  But I have ongoing questions.  And I most certainly treat vaccination carefully.  I would want to do very thorough risk/benefit analysis of each vaccine recommended to me.
    Recall that autoimmune diseases are skyrocketing in recent decades.  Tweaking the incompletely understood immune system should not be done casually!

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  • Thu, Jan 10, 2019 - 5:30pm

    #7
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 175

    Australia has a vaccination dictatorship

    I’ve been following the vaccination controversy for some years now.
    In Australia it is almost totally compulsory to have one’s children vaccinated to be admitted to daycare and kindergarten and to receive a range of benefits. Look up “No Jab No Play” for further info. Under law an exemption may be granted, but in one case we know of the government department concerned disobeyed its own laws, rules and procedures several times in refusing to progress the application. On one occasion they wrote that they had the ability to “go over and above the legislation” in dealing with the matter. Whaaaat? Lies and dictatorial BS!
    FYI, the exemption has been granted. They’re seeking another for their second child and are so far have been completely stone-walled. But they persist.
    A while ago the Australian Child Vaccination Register was renamed the Australian Vaccination Register. So here’s a conspiracy theory: sounds like they’re preparing for all vaccinations to be compulsory for all Australian citizens and perhaps all residents. What penalties are envisaged for non-compliance I know not. House arrest?
    Would I let myself be vaccinated? Depends. The annual flu shot? No. Anecdotal evidence around here is that they’re either useless or even harmful. Tetanus? Yes, definitely. Shots I’ve had in my life include Yellow Fever, Polio and Tetanus, and I think I am the better for all of them. (Post-polio is horrid.) Vaccinations are a mixed blessing. Most of them seem useful and good, but there exists this grey area which no-one in power wants to discuss. Why?
    One thing that puzzles me is the message that unvaccinated children present a hazard to the vaccinated and hence cannot be admitted to schools. But aren’t the vaccinated kids now bullet-proof? Isn’t that the whole point of vaccination? Any epidemiologists on PP who could enlighten me? I’d love to know.
    In the shopping mall yesterday was an advertising board telling students now to get vaccinated against meningococcal disease. But I have read that this is a very rare infection, and that in one study the vaccine produced a higher death rate than the infection. Is this true? Is this another revenue stream for Big Pharma or a genuine health concern? Are they making a mountain out of a molehill?
    A while back I watched the 7-part docu-series “The Truth about Vaccines.” It seemed to be based on reliable witnesses and scientific testimony, and not a religious or ideological rant. In it Bobby Kennedy said that he supports vaccination in principle but that the CDC are hopelessly compromised by making the vaccines and immunising themselves against legal liability. (My wording.) Andrew Wakefield was allowed to present his side of the story: it does indeed seem that he has been the subject of sustained character assassination. The series featured a purported CDC whistleblower (voice only) who said that high-ups in the CDC refuse to let their own children be vaccinated. True? I have no idea. The same or other CDC whistleblowers said that data is massaged to remove anomalies or unwanted results. In one case the negative results could not be made to go away but the vaccine was sold anyway. True? I have no idea.
    PP had better be careful here. Green Med Info, a useful medical info clearing house with no particular axe to grind, recently got itself expelled from Pinterest. “They” can be awfully nasty at times.

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  • Thu, Jan 10, 2019 - 7:16pm

    Reply to #7
    Yoxa

    Yoxa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 20 2011

    Posts: 286

    Quote:  Would I let myself be

    Quote:

     Would I let myself be vaccinated? Depends. The annual flu shot? No. Anecdotal evidence around here is that they’re either useless or even harmful.

    Look for wide-scale epidemiological studies, not just anecdotal evidence. Individual experiences need to be noted, but what are the results population-wide?  
    FYI, Saskatchewan, Canada has had six flu-related deaths since the fall, three of whom were young children.
    From Dec. 23 to 29, 2018, the province reported 64 new influenza cases, including one death and one ICU admission.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/4832264/saskatchewan-flu-cases-since-septembe
    Whatever the alleged hazards of vaccinations might or might not be, there’s no debating that real diseases create real dangers.

    Quote:

     Post-polio is horrid.

    Yes. I’ve met more than one person who was crippled for life as a result of polio. They had the misfortune to get the disease before immunization was available. One such person that you might have heard of is the violinist Itshak Perlman. He has to sit while performing because he cannot play standing up like a concert soloist normally would. He contracted polio at age four.

    Quote:

     Is this another revenue stream for Big Pharma or a genuine health concern?

    Those aren’t always antithetical.
     

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  • Thu, Jan 10, 2019 - 8:46pm

    #8

    sand_puppy

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 1815

    Cochrane Collaboration --> flu shot not very effective

    The influenza vaccine is one that I skip.  Though it does no harm, it also has minimal benefit.
    Only about 4% -6% of Influenza-like illness (ILI) are caused by influenza A or B (sometimes called the “true flu”).  The rest of the ILI are caused by some 200 viruses that circulate during the same winter season as flu A & B.  The only group that might potentially benefit from a flu vaccine is the 4%-6% that have a “true flu.”  A very effective vaccine (say 50% efficacy) might drop the influenza rates from 6% to 3%.  That is all!
    The Cochrane Collaboration is a bunch of statisticians that do do meta-analyses of pooled clinical studies.  It is (to the best of my knowledge) not under the influence of big pharm and big money.  My understanding is that The Cochrane Library is the best source of unbiased information on a topic.
    The have several long running assessments of the influenza vaccination which they update and summarize every few years:
    1.  Vaccines for preventing influenza in the elderly
    2.  Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults
    3.  Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy children
    4.  Influenza vaccinations for healthcare workers who care for people aged 60 and greater living in long term care institutions.
    Their results are surprising:  The benefit of influenza vaccination is very small, somewhere between 1% and 3% reduction in influenza cases.  Even when pooling multiple studies they have not been able to demonstrate any decreased death, pneumonia, hospitalization, or days missing work.
    From the Healthy Adults study:

    We found 52 clinical trials of over 80,000 adults. We were unable to determine the impact of bias on about 70% of the included studies due to insufficient reporting of details. Around 15% of the included studies were well designed and conducted. We focused on reporting of results from 25 studies that looked at inactivated vaccines. Injected influenza vaccines probably have a small protective effect against influenza and ILI (moderate-certainty evidence), as 71 people would need to be vaccinated to avoid one influenza case, and 29 would need to be vaccinated to avoid one case of ILI. Vaccination may have little or no appreciable effect on hospitalisations (low-certainty evidence) or number of working days lost.

    In the elderly

    We identified eight RCTs (over 5000 participants), .. . Older adults receiving the influenza vaccine may experience less influenza over a single season compared with placebo, from 6% to 2.4%…  These results indicate that 30 people would need to be vaccinated to prevent one person experiencing influenza, and 42 would need to be vaccinated to prevent one person having an ILI. … The study providing data for mortality and pneumonia was underpowered to detect differences in these outcomes. There were 3 deaths from 522 participants in the vaccination arm and 1 death from 177 participants in the placebo arm, providing very low‐certainty evidence for the effect on mortality (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.11 to 9.72). No cases of pneumonia occurred in one study that reported this outcome (very low‐certainty evidence). No data on hospitalisations were reported.

    Healthcare workers are often required by their institutions to get the annual flu shot to “protect the patients.”  Yet, no patient benefit of flu vaccination of healthcare workers has actually been demostrated.  Institutional zeal to vaccinate all healthcare workers greatly exceeds the evidence of any benefit.

    Offering influenza vaccination to healthcare workers who care for those aged 60 or over in LTCIs [i.e.–nursing homesmay have little or no effect on laboratory-proven influenza (low quality evidence). HCW vaccination programmes probably have a small effect on lower respiratory tract infection (moderate quality evidence), but they may have little or no effect on admission to hospital (low quality evidence). It is unclear what effect vaccination programmes have on death due to lower respiratory tract illness (very low quality evidence) or all cause deaths (very low quality evidence).

    Though I have no hard evidence, I suspect that wearing a mask when sick and frequent hand washing would be more effective than the flu shot and be effective against ALL of the ILI viruses.
    Keep up with Vitamin D3, N Acetyl Cysteine, antioxidants and get plenty of sleep.

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 12:14am

    Reply to #8
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 175

    Cleanliness remains highly prophylactic

    sand_puppy wrote:

    Though I have no hard evidence, I suspect that wearing a mask when sick and frequent hand washing would be more effective than the flu shot and be effective against ALL of the ILI viruses.

    The BBC’s medical journalist Michael Moseley in a fairly recent show examined the effectiveness of the fancy hand sanitisers we see scattered around more and more. He had one hand washed using the fancy stuff, the other washed using plain old soap and water. Examination under UV light showed that the soap and water had done the better job.

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 12:25am

    Reply to #7
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 29 2009

    Posts: 175

    Self-determination + Precautionary Principle

    I have a strong desire to decide what I permit to be injected into me and what not. If I examine the evidence (thanks to sand-puppy below) and find that flu vaccines are of little benefit, and that my not submitting to one harms no-one, then my decision should be honoured. If I accept the risk that I may harm myself, that is my own affair.
    I wish also to follow the Precautionary Principle in all of this: first do no harm. If we can’t be sure whether or not any given vaccine will be harmful, then we should not be compelled (forced) to accept it.
    When it comes to the Typhoid Marys, what? First we must be sure that Mary is indeed a danger and once that is established then take measures including forcible detention if necessary. Look how suspected Ebola carriers are treated, and some of the people quarantined were only suspected of being carriers or victims.
    But most of this discussion is about the coercive nature of the vaccination program. We are not allowed to dissent, and it appears that important evidence is being hidden from us.

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 3:24am

    Reply to #7

    Michael_Rudmin

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 25 2014

    Posts: 825

    Ironically, polio vaccines also can be a concern

    Yes, polio is a big concern. And yes, it can do real damage. One of my mom’s friends, when I was a child, had a significant limp from polio. It did cause her trouble, though it was eventually healed at a charismatic prayer meeting. Though all were supposed to close their eyes and pray, a friend wanted to see and opened her eyes: she described the short leg shooting out longer than the correct leg, then relaxing back until they were the same length. After that, the woman didn’t have a limp.
    But that isn’t something that we can get off the shelf. Polio vaccines, we can.
    So what’s the problem? To some, there would seem to be an association between polio vaccines and type I diabetes. That, too, can be a huge problem, bigger than polio. More than that, there is a mechanism that has been proposed, since the polio vaccine is developed within the pancreas cells of an animal. Point being, it could be an autoimmune reaction that does this.

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 5:41am

    #9
    VeganDB12

    VeganDB12

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 18 2008

    Posts: 107

    vaccines

    Bad news about the flu vax SP
    We are having a large outbreak of measles in my area due to low vaccination rates in concentrated communities. Having had measles at the age of 15, I don’t wish that event on anyone.
    Just a request: when looking at adverse effects of vaccines it is important to compare that to the adverse effects of not vaccinating as SP attempted to do. All vaccines have side effects, some can trigger immune issues IMHO.  I get quite ill from the flu vax for example.
    Still, the death rates from measles in the 3rd world are undeniable.  In the US the death rate is only 1/1000 per CDC stats but hospitalizations are 1/4. Adults don’t do well with many childhood diseases.
    https://www.cdc.gov/measles/downloads/measlesdataandstatsslideset.pdf
    SP I wonder what you think of the Gardisil issue now that pap smears for a completely curable cancer (if caught early) are so infrequent? Seems to me more frequent pap smears to detect cervical cancer early is better than the vaccine for HPV but those are not the current recommendations.
     
    complex issues

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 6:46am

    #10
    Doug

    Doug

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 01 2008

    Posts: 1353

    Polio

    I had polio as a 3 year old.  I was lucky as I survived with only minor residual effects.  But, I was hospitalized for three months, at times near death.  My memories of that period are fragmentary.  I recall feeling that I was tied down in bed.  I’m pretty sure I was paralyzed rather than constrained.
    My family was lucky.  My father was in the Army so my health care was free for us.  But, with health care costs what they are today, what would three months in the hospital with intensive care cost?  The cost of a simple vaccination is miniscule by comparison.  Even the possibility of eventual diabetes would not dissuade me from getting my children vaccinated.  (Btw, I’ve never heard of that side effect.  At the age of 72 I have no reason to think I am particularly in danger despite having a family history of diabetes)
    The bottom line for me is – does the vaccination work?  I get a flu shot every year.  So far so good.  I got a shingles vaccination a few years ago.  A very reasonable precaution to prevent the kind of discomfort I’ve seen others suffer.  I had measles and mumps as a kid.  That was normal in those days, but given the consequences some people experience vaccination seems like a good idea to prevent contagion. 

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 12:06pm

    #11

    sand_puppy

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 1815

    Professor Dies As a Result of Yellow Fever Vaccine

    Just this morning, there is a report of a professor of medicine who died shortly after a Yellow Fever Vaccination.  Generally, I regard the Yellow Fever vaccine as one of the “safe” ones that I would personally get if traveling to Africa or South America.

    A pioneering cancer expert, professor Martin Gore, died suddenly yesterday after a routine inoculation for yellow fever.

    Martin Gore, 67, suffered total organ failure soon after having the jab, which is recommended for travellers to parts of Africa, the Caribbean and South and Central America. His death highlights the increased risks associated with the vaccine for the growing number of older travellers visiting exotic destinations.
    The doctor was a professor of cancer medicine at the Royal Marsden NHS foundation trust and the Institute of Cancer Research in London.

    To me, this highlights the unpredictable unpredictability of messing with the very complex and incompletely understood immune system.
     

     

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 4:07pm

    #12
    fated

    fated

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 16 2014

    Posts: 49

    The state knows best - sarc

    I think vaccination is one of those areas where society has been gradually lulled into believing ‘state knows best’ and the individual knows nothing. Dissenters are silenced, and there is no open discussion. $$$ talk.
    As Ezlxq has explained above, we here in Australia are gradually being forced into what amounts to mandatory vaccination with an ever expanding number of jabs, or face exclusion from family assistance benefits that are otherwise only financially tested, and access to childcare.
    My belief is – my body – my choice – I’ll suffer the consequences – and I’ll make my decicions based on the best of my adult thinking without being co-erced into anything by any ‘authority’. An authority who is not open to a full and honest discussion is not to be trusted and has no right to tinker with my body.
    (This belief has been strengthened after a near death birthing experience filled with trauma, Laurel and Hardy type mistake making, and minimal information received or decicion making allowed on my part. I have a right to suicide if I ever choose, but the ‘healthcare’ system does not have the right to kill me through incompetence, arrogance, financial greed or laziness.)
    I may be accused of being willing to ‘burden the system’ with a disease I could have been vaccinated against, but I counter argue that by pointing out the consumption of cola drinks and lack of healthy eating by society in general. The medical consequences of these are both treated without recrimination, and take recources away from others who need them through no personal fault in behaviour. Parents who engage in these bad habits and teach them to their children as normal food, are as guilty of the insinuated ‘negligence’ directed toward a parent who does not vaccinate in my view. So don’t try and guilt trip me into a vaccination!
    We are now offering Gardisil vaccination for boys. No. If you won’t vaccinate your daughter, or teach her to get a pap smear that’s not my concern. I’d be encouraging my boy to wear protection anyway to avoid bigger issues like HIV and pregnancy. BUT my son won’t be getting a vaccination to protect anyone else’s daughter – including my possible future daughter in law. And my daughter would not receive it either. It only covers for 4 of the cancer causing strains of HPV, which cover off 70% of cases. The controversy around this vaccination is too great – and there’s a false sense of security that people are now 100% safe and protected. They are not. (By the way I worked with Dr Ian Frazer’s daughter for a time so he’s not just a random researcher to me).
    I think it’s time the individual took back some personal responsibility.
    Personal responsibility around sexual relations, hand washing, staying in when ill, etc. etc.
    Perhaps our modern vaccination schedule is too much of a techno fantasy and common sense has gone out the window.
    Anyhow, there are many, many areas of discussion around disease prevention and vaccine, however when co-ercion or reward are used by government to override free choice of bodily autonomy I beleive we have a problem.
    I know of nobody in my personal circle who has contracted a vaccine preventable illness like flu and died from it. I know of one elderly relative with a limp from polio. I do have close relative who has had vaccine reaction including ongoing neurological disturbances, and diagnosed autoimmune conditions.
    There are always risks in life. Being alive will kill you in the end.
    However part of life is deciding which risks you will take.
     
     

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 5:10pm

    Reply to #12
    Yoxa

    Yoxa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 20 2011

    Posts: 286

    Stqying in when ill

    Quote:

     staying in when ill

    This seems like a no-brainer but it can be a tough decision for people who would lose pay or even put their job at risk if they miss work.
    I wish I had an answer ffor that …

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 5:51pm

    Reply to #12
    fated

    fated

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 16 2014

    Posts: 49

    staying in when ill

    Yoxa –  I work casual = no work no pay. So I understand that one fully. sad
    Some workplaces enforce it more strictly than others too.
    BTW in Australia a casual wage is loaded by approx 20% to make up for lack of leave entitlements. Smart people live without that 20% so when they are sick or need time off to care for family they can pay themselves. I have workmates who go on regular holidays and have fancy clothesd etc., but can’t afford to be ill. I can afford illness and fewer luxuries.
    It’s similar to the dilemma of a working woman putting her mildly ill child into childcare for the day so she can go to work.
    Society just isn’t as cohesive or supportive the way it used to be.

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  • Fri, Jan 11, 2019 - 6:18pm

    Reply to #12
    fated

    fated

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 16 2014

    Posts: 49

    staying in when ill

    Yoxa –  I work casual so no work no pay here. Unfortunately I understand that one fully. sad
    Some workplaces enforce it more strictly than others too. (staying away from work when ill)
    BTW in Australia a casual wage is loaded by approx 20% to make up for lack of leave entitlements. Smart people live without that 20% so when they are sick or need time off to care for family they can pay themselves. I have workmates who go on regular holidays and have fancy clothes etc., but can’t afford to be ill. I can afford illness and fewer luxuries.
    It’s similar to the dilemma of a working woman putting her mildly ill child into childcare for the day so she can go to work.
    Society just isn’t as cohesive or supportive the way it used to be.

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