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    From: How To Lose Weight
  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 1:55am

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    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Online)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3207

    weight, diet; my experience

    I’m going to second ao’s observation on the use of “internal sense” (he calls it intuition) in diet and weight control.

    I think my weight peaked in my late 20s – I was 5-9 and 180 pounds.  I got upset at being chubby, and responded by trying lots of different diets, which worked to varying degrees, but all of them required constant exercises in willpower.  At least they did for me.  My exercise varied between weights, cardio, and eventually martial arts, but I was always maybe 10 pounds over weight.  I mean, when I trained for a fight (which involved running every day – I hate running, sadly) I was able to drop down to 150 pounds, but I just couldn’t maintain that level of intensity, and so my weight moved back up to 165-174 (75-79 kg) which is where my steady-state was (with constant struggle) until…

    Well until recently.  Part of it involved guided meditation on releasing all the stuff surrounding unhealthy food addictions.  It took a while (a year?  maybe two?) to take effect, but eventually I got in tune with my body, and now when I see and smell fried chicken I know it would taste good, but my body gives me a message that it doesn’t really want that.  It doesn’t take effort or “diet”.  I just feel a vague sense of unease, and I go with it – I just avoid buying that food item.  As a result, without any exercise of willpower or struggle I have been able to give up a lot of the foods that probably weren’t helping me.

    And now I’m at 156-160 (71-73 kg), maintained with no real effort – weights 2-3 times per week, and sporadic martial arts training which even after 15 years I still enjoy.  I eat a lot of stir fry (vegetables, pork, rice noodles in various combinations) and every day I have oatmeal for breakfast (organic, make it myself in a big pot) with some coconut sugar and passion fruit and butter.  And some cream too.  It is very tasty – probably more carbs than I “should” have.  But it doesn’t seem to matter.

    I also have given up most processed foods.  It too was not an exercise in will; my body just told me it didn’t like it.  The sausages I used to love and eat every day just two years ago – my body doesn’t want them anymore.

    The “dropping away” of the ultraprocessed foods was a process too.  It happened “organically” rather than some sort of effort, plan, or exercise of will.  I slowly just stopped buying them when I went shopping.

    Also – my quantity control seems better now.  I’ll have the weekly steak (about 8 oz of tenderloin, peppercorn sauce, potato wedges, and vegetables) but I can’t even finish the steak.  My body doesn’t really want more than about 6 oz.  I save the rest for later.  I get full really fast.  And then I stop eating.  I don’t go for pasta that often.  Sometimes I’ll make a 4-cheese sauce and put it on ravioli, but my body doesn’t want too many ravioli.  So I save it for later.  Sashimi is good – I can eat more of that than steak.  But that’s maybe once a week too.

    Supplements: CoQ10, Curcumin, fish oil, NAC+glycine, bone broth.

    Could I have done this in my 20s?  Could I have “tuned in” to my body back then?  Maybe.  Who knows!  I didn’t have the tools back then, so its hard to know.

    Here’s a fun recent study done at NIH that confirms that eating ultraprocessed foods lead to weight gain – possibly because those foods don’t send the “I’m full” signal to the brain.  Avoiding said foods can either be an act of struggle and willpower, as it used to be with me, or maybe you can find a way to get in tune with your body, and perhaps your process will become more effort free.

    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-finds-heavily-processed-foods-cause-overeating-weight-gain

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  • From: How To Lose Weight
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 11:43pm

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    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 49

    Sigh

    You’re eating a LOT of baked goods? Doesn’t baking consume energy? And doesn’t energy consumption heat the planet? Why not adopt a raw foods diet?

    AO, I generate more power than I use from my solar panels. I also have a solar oven.

    Your anecdotes about feeling unwell on soy point to a similar problem to me: I cannot tolerate soy in any form. Individual people may have food intolerances, which are quite different to allergies and quite difficult to identify. I have a long list of foods I avoid. I recommend the book on food intolerances by Dr Jonathan Brostoff to you (a bit out of date now, but very useful to me).

    Cattle vs bison? There were about 20 million bison before Europeans arrived in America, versus the ~100 million cattle now in the US. And cattle produce about 2x the amount of methane that bison do. There are studies showing that bison were net carbon sequesterers.

     

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  • From: Fall Gardening
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 8:47pm

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    robshepler

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 16 2010

    Posts: 125

    Green manure, cover crops?

    We have been planting a mix of winter wheat, hairy vetch, field peas and red clove after we have winter killed. It serves to cover the soil and feed the fungi over the winter. Great thought Travis! And spot on.

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  • From: How To Lose Weight
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 7:16pm

    Reply to #
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Online)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 943

    1+

    genetics, Gerry, genetics and doesn't baking=heat

    Years ago, I played with all different diets.  I fasted, did intermittent fasting, did meal spacings and volumes, juggled macro-nutrient ratios, juggled calories from hypo- to hypercaloric, etc.  I simply DO NOT feel good or function well on a 10:1 carb:protein ratio.  Sorry, but that’s just the way it is.  Now maybe someone who is eating a lot of soy and raising their estrogen levels (and lowering their testosterone levels) and doing minimal or light exercise (and not high intensity, high load exercise) may do fine on that.  I don’t know.  But doing what I do in this body, it doesn’t work for me.

    I was also a vegetarian for a couple of years and had good endurance but seemed to lose peak strength and also seemed vulnerable to coming down with colds and other minor infections.  I was also more prone to injury.  And when I dropped my fat intake real low, although I had only 4% body fat and great muscle definition, I also noted I started losing hair.  Overall, I just never felt as healthy as when I had some animal protein in my diet.

    Let me pose a few queries here.  You’re eating a LOT of baked goods?  Doesn’t baking consume energy?  And doesn’t energy consumption heat the planet?  Why not adopt a raw foods diet?

    Now I know cattle produce a lot of methane but don’t other ruminants also?  Are you saying you wouldn’t like to see buffalo herds come back in the Great American West or large reindeer herds to the northern climates and central Asia or vast herds of wildebeast, water buffalos, etc. in Africa, and so on?  They’re all part of the ecosystem.  And guess what?  They’re all gonna die some day.  Can we possibly compete with other predators for some of that meat?  How about eating rats?  The little buggers are all over the place and compete with us for the plant foods.  The Southeast Asians love ’em.  I know I’d eat ’em in a pinch and, under the right circumstances, I might even develop a taste for them.

    What about nomadic peoples?   I think it’d be rather tough for them to get rid of their animals and rely on carrying around fields or planters that are not very portable.  There are lots of factors to consider before we start dictating diets to our fellow inhabitants of this planet.

    I get very uncomfortable with imperatives … we MUST makes me feel a little uneasy.  I have no problem with you doing what your conscience or science or whatever guides you to do.  But I would get uncomfortable when someone starts telling me what I should eat.  Besides, have you ever tried to dictate to people what they should eat?  It’s like trying to get them to change their religious belief or political affiliation.  Good luck!

     

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  • From: Fall Gardening
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 7:10pm

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    travissidelinger

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 17 2010

    Posts: 74

    1+

    Putting the garden to bed

    What we do:
    * Cut off everything above the ground, chop it up, add to the compost pile
    * Keep all roots in the soil
    * Heck, use the lawn mower if needed (I use hand shears)
    * Gather all the leaves we can get, pile them all over the garden, 6 inches or more deep
    * Sometimes we use black weed block to keep the soil covered (blocks weeds and keeps the sun off), but don’t block too much or you kill the soil
    * Add leaves to the compost pile, mix the pile well, add water if it’s dry
    * The leaves protect the soil, block weeds, and break down into new soil
    * We also add some straw (but straw can add grass seeds)
    * Be careful where you get external stuff like straw that they did not use any herbicides

    When spring comes:
    * Pull back the leaves where your rows are at, add new composted soil to the row, and plant new stuff
    * Only trim the weeds if they get too tall, but generally leave them

    After doing this for a few years the insect life is our back yard is doing amazing. Yes we loose a few items, but generally everything everything is much healthier.

    -Travis

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  • From: How To Lose Weight
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 6:41pm

    Reply to #
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Online)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 943

    1+

    to Mots and Gerry on Atkins

    I don’t know if you gentlemen realize it, but Atkins didn’t necessarily follow the Atkins diet closely.  I lived in the NYC metro area more than half my life, commuted into NYC for years, and rubbed shoulders with patients who rubbed shoulders with Atkins.  So I have it on good authority.  Also, he didn’t originate the Atkins diet.  Carleton Fredericks did.  But while Fredericks didn’t recommend it to everyone, Atkins just about did.  And as you may well realize, Atkins was highly incentivized by the wealth aspect of his diet whereas I think Fredericks was more interested in seeking the scientific truth.  Also, do we know if the Atkins diet was genetically suited to Atkins?  I don’t.  Also, do we know at what age he adopted the diet?  I don’t.   We do know he liked the good life so early bad habits may not have been overcome by later dietary change.  I know a lot of physicians and a surprising number of them are not healthy and do not eat well.  Years ago, my mother baby sat for a physician’s four sons.  She came home appalled that he thought pizza was a healthy supper for his children.  He said it contained the 4 major food groups: grains (i.e. dough), dairy (i.e. cheese), vegetable (i.e. tomato sauce), and meat (i.e. pepperoni).  She wasn’t joking and neither was he!

    We also know that even if you have a so-called perfect diet, stress can wreak havoc on multiple organ systems (including your cardiovascular system).  In addition, the cortisol released as a response to stress is likely to make you gain weight much more easily and become fat.  Doctors are under a lot of stress, nowadays more than ever.  The two jobs you couldn’t give to me anymore including be being a medical doctor and being a cop.  Tough jobs that are becoming increasingly thankless.

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  • From: How To Lose Weight
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 6:25pm

    Reply to #
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Online)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 943

    1+

    thanks Mots for that great reply

    You obviously know your stuff and are probably more knowledgeable on the research end than I am.  When I was young, I relied heavily upon research and the formal codified knowledge base.  But as I got older (and hopefully wiser), I realize that the research did not always guide me in the right direction.  In fact, it sometimes downright failed me.  I began exploring intuition, tacit knowledge, and non-linear thinking more and studied psychophysical approaches that enhanced my capabilities in this area.  As you know, the path of science takes many twists and turns, most which are usually beyond our ability to predict.  We know about the multiple historical examples of the individual who comes along and upsets the knowledge apple cart and changes the course of history as a result.  The insight that yielded that dramatic revelation usually had intuition and tacit knowledge at its foundation.  And so I learned to study my own body, those of patients, and real world examples for information as much as from the formal research.  Interestingly, science often came along at a later date and proved what I had earlier intuited.

    I learned to eat food that was good for me, not just food that tasted good.  In other words, I tried to avoid emotion driving my eating choices … whether using food as psychological medication, food to ameliorate boredom, food to take the place of something else missing in my life, etc.  I’m sure the baked goods that Gerry is eating taste good but the question remains, are they good for you?  I have to say, with over four decades of clinical experience, I’ve never seen anyone who daily consumed a significant amount of baked goods to be truly healthy.  Not one.  They may be out there but I never saw them.

    As you well realize, nutrition is a field that is rife with confusion and contradiction.  We’re still learning and that includes myself.  Nutrition is a “sloppy” field and not as precise as electrical engineering.  It’s interesting the path you followed.  I went from considering a career in electrical engineering (and being good at math but not loving math) to changing to the human sciences.  You’ve seem to have done the opposite.  To each their own.  I’ll comment on the Atkins issue in another post.  Thanks for taking time out of your schedule to answer.

     

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  • From: Home Prices: Downhill From Here
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 6:20pm

    #

    lambertad

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 31 2013

    Posts: 181

    Real Vision - housing episode

    Excellent Real Vision episode of housing market dynamics. The defaults and reluctancy of banks to foreclose is outrageous. I should just stop paying the mortgage and live for free for 5, 6, maybe 7 years…. there’s a thought.

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  • From: Fall Gardening
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 5:04pm

    #
    vlierheimer

    vlierheimer

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 22 2019

    Posts: 4

    Hi Phil! How do I put my garden to bed?

    Hi Phil!

    Upon the PP gurus advice, I found myself an itty-bitty microfarm in SW Colorado. I rented out the farmhouse to a lovely family, and get to use the one acre myself to dig in the dirt.

    I set up plasticulture to smother out several 20 by 20 foot plots, and tried my hand at some no and low-till gardening on the first 20 by  20 plot. I learned a lot, and enjoyed my own squashes, tomatoes and apples immensely. (I also put in an itty-bitty orchard, four pear and four apple trees, they like it down there).

    Anyway, now that it’s frosted, I’m looking for advice on how I put the garden to bed. Do I just let the frosted plants lie there? Chop up the tomato skeletons?

    Any advice would be appreciated and all resources investigated.

    Thanks so much!

    Victoria

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  • From: How To Lose Weight
  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 4:37pm

    #

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 49

    Our diets need to change...

    Yes Mots, a medical report issued by the New York medical examiner’s office a year after Atkins’s death showed that Atkins had a history of heart attack, congestive heart failure and hypertension and noted that he weighed 258 pounds at death. His widow refused to allow an autopsy because it is likely that he actually died from a heart attack by suddenly falling over in the street. So his estate has managed to paper over it by claiming he died from hitting his head and suffering a brain clot. Atkins was only 72 as well, relatively young, and quite fat. So much for low carb diets!

    The research I linked above is also compelling. I’ll quote some of it here because it seems to have been ignored:

    New research from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre suggests a low protein, high carbohydrate diet may be the most effective for stimulating a hormone with life-extending and obesity-fighting benefits.

    The findings, published today in Cell Metabolism, paint a clearer picture of the role of a little-known hormone called Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) – the so-called ‘fountain of youth’ hormone produced primarily in the liver.

    Previous studies have shown that FGF21 plays a role in curbing appetite, moderating metabolism, improving the immune system and extending lifespan. It is also currently being used as a therapeutic target for diabetes, though little is known about how this hormone is triggered and released in the body.

    Now researchers from the Charles Perkins Centre have found that diets high in carbohydrate and low in protein are the best for boosting levels of FGF21 in mice.

    “Despite the popularity of high protein ‘paleo’ diets, our research suggests the exact opposite may be best for us as we age – that a low protein, high carbohydrate diet was the most beneficial for latelife health and longevity,” said lead author Dr Samantha Solon-Biet.

    Lastly, plant-based diets simply MUST supercede meat and protein based diets if we are to have any hope of controlling global heating. For example, beef is more than 100 times as emissions-intensive as legumes. BTW I eat a LOT of baked goods made from legume flour, specifically lentil flour, home made. I have no unusual gas, and my bowel motions are normal.

    Change your diet to combat climate change in 2019

    And if you are not ready for a meat-free diet, try a “flexitarian” diet. This diet includes plenty of fruits, vegetables and plant-based protein sources including legumes, soybeans and nuts, along with modest amounts of poultry, fish, milk and eggs, and small amounts of red meat.

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