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Off The Cuff: The Fed May Be Less Worried Of A Stock Plunge Than We Think

As long as credit flows, it's OK with lower stock prices
Tuesday, March 27, 2018, 2:53 PM

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Axel Merk discuss:

  • Dissecting Last Week's FOMC Meeting
    • Powell definitely seems different from his predecessors
  • Why The Fed May Not Worry About Stock Prices
    • All it really cares about are functioning credit markets
  • How Sick Is Europe?
    • Very, but it can linger a long time
  • The Prospects For Gold
    • Well-poised to outperform other assets this year

In the wake of last week's FMOC meeting, the first one for new Fed Chairman Jerome Powell, our site's central banking expert Axel returns to the podcast to share his assessment of the banking world's newest sheriff. Axel believes, as a lawyer (unlike his academic predecessors), Powell is fairly unconcerned with economic theory or asset prices. What he cares most about is regulation and the continued functioning of markets. So as long as credit -- the lifeblood of the global economy -- is flowing, he may not care much where prices end up...

Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today.
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What If Nations Were Less Dependent on One Another?

The Case for Autarky
Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 4:13 PM

Autarky is more than a ten-dollar word for self-sufficiency, as it implies a number of questions that “self-sufficiency” alone might not.

The ability to survive without trade or aid from other nations, for example, is not the same as the ability to reap enormous profits or grow one’s economy without trade with other nations. In other words, 'self-sufficiency' in terms of survival does not necessarily imply prosperity, but it does imply freedom of action without dependency on foreign approval, capital, resources, and expertise. » Read more

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What Happened to the Future?

Hopes dim as global net energy per capita declines
Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 2:15 PM

Improbably, the global economy has returned to growth over the past four years despite the ravages of a deflationary debt collapse, a punishing oil shock, ongoing constraint from debt and deleveraging, and stagnant global wages. The proof of this growth comes from the best indicator of all: the growth of global energy consumption. » Read more

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Mike Maloney: Today's Low Gold & Silver Prices Are Not Realistic

The good news is that they can't last much longer
Friday, April 12, 2013, 8:49 PM

During this very tumultuous week for precious metals prices, Chris sat down with Mike Maloney, founder and owner of GoldSilver.com, one of the world's largest bullion dealers.

Mike is a true scholar of monetary history. His reasons for getting into the bullion business have their roots in a very predictable cycle that has happened time and again over the centuries (more accurately millennia): » Read more

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The Arrival of Japan's Sunset

The repercussions will be tremendous
Monday, February 18, 2013, 6:05 PM

For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled. ~ Richard Feynman

Waiting for Japan's economy to make a strong recovery has been an ongoing game since 1990. Shall we play that game one more time? » Read more

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Off the Cuff: The Plot Thickens

Developments are happening faster now
Thursday, September 13, 2012, 1:11 AM

In this week's Off the Cuff with Mish & Chris podcast, Mish and Chris tackle

  • The German Constitutional Court decision
    • What importance does it have? Any?
  • America is back in recession
    • More hard-to-refute data
  • Whither the Fed?
    • Why markets will be disappointed by Bernanke

Surprising to those who don't read this site, a number of notable announcements are happening this week besides Apple's unveiling of the iPhone 5...

Today, the German Constitutional Court made its ruling on the legality of Mario Drahgi's plans to flood European banks with liquidity. The court has the power to block the ECB's profligacy; but it seems that once again, politics trumps justice. Draghi will be allowed to proceed with some tissue-thin restraints. 

Meanwhile, new data show North America's economies are slowing down. Indeed, more and more analysts are coming to the conclusion that the US has slipped back into recession (even though to many it feels as if America had never left it). Jabbering of 'recovery' and slight declines in the official employment rate – which is a complete farce, as those unable to find work after a time are removed from the lists of those counted as 'unemployed' – are fooling no one at this point.

Which leads all eyes to the Fed. What will it do (or better asked, what can it do) to combat this dismal data? » Read more