Thanksgiving

Featured Discussion

Thanksgiving Dinner For $0.50 (in 1909)

Thanksgiving Dinner For $0.50 (in 1909)

A fancy dinner cost 50 cents 100 years ago (thanks a lot for the inflation since, Federal Reserve...)

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Happy Thanksgiving To All U.S. Readers

And an offering of gratitude for everyone
Thursday, November 27, 2014, 10:59 AM

Today is Thanksgiving in the US, a prominent holiday typically marked by insane travel nightmares for many, and a chance to spend time with non-core relatives.

To balance all that out we usually overeat, over drink, and slip into a tryptophan coma in front of the TV.

At least, that’s what the holiday has become for many.

Here at Peak Prosperity we like to remember that the holiday consists of two words, thanks and giving. » Read more

Featured Discussion

Humor: Behavioral Economics At The Thanksgiving Table

Humor: Behavioral Economics At The Thanksgiving Table

How to limit over-eating without taxing your self-control

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A World of Thanks

Taking stock of what matters
Thursday, November 28, 2013, 12:33 PM

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!  Below, Chris and I share our reasons for why we are so thankful this year. » Read more

Insider

Off the Cuff: Will We Learn from Japan's Missteps In Time?

Its fate could shock other countries into action
Thursday, November 22, 2012, 3:14 AM

In this week's Off the Cuff with Mish & Chris podcast, Mish and Chris discuss:

  • Japan's Kamikaze Monetary Policy
    • The yen may be poised for destruction
  • Denial is a river in Germany, Greece, and Spain
    • Poor decisions being made in all three countries
  • Fiscal Cliff: Deal or No Deal?
    • What's most likely at this point

In this Thanksgiving edition of Off the Cuff, Chris and Mish are grateful for Japan. Why? Because Japan will likely collapse under its unsustainable monetary and fiscal policies before the U.S. does.

Much of the structural rot that ails the U.S. has been festering for much longer in Japan. With signs growing that the Japanese economy is nearing its predictable endgame, its implosion might be shocking enough to cause our leaders to think seriously that fate could be ours if we don't take radically different actions immediately. » Read more