earth

Featured Discussion

Scary Data

Scary Data

Scientists are warning that humanity has exceeded 4 of 9 planetary boundaries

Featured Discussion

Dashboard of the World

Dashboard of the World

Real-time stats on our global predicament

Daily Prep

Visualizing the Impact of Humans

Interactive timelapse landsat photos
Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 5:18 PM

A fascinating and sometimes disturbing look at the impacts humans have on their environment as we develop, grow, and inhabit our world.  You can explore the pre-selected regions/topics (oil sands) or use the "Explore the World" link at the bottom right of the page to type in your own location and look at how your region has changed over the past 30 years. 

http://world.time.com/timelapse/?hpt=hp_t3

Note:  Grab the slider and move it back in time to see how things might look in reverse.  How long would it take for Nature to reclaim the land and reverse the impacts of our development and growth?

Daily Digest

Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video, Flickr Creative Commons

Daily Digest 5/2 - Running Out Of Planet To Exploit, What If We Never Run Out of Oil?

Thursday, May 2, 2013, 11:56 AM
  • Federal Reserve Refuses to Submit to an Audit of Germany’s Gold Held in U.S. Vaults
  • Neil Macdonald: The secretive world of printing money
  • The Unofficial Inflation Rate
  • Lasers, microwave deployed in high-speed trading arms race
  • IRS Data Web Snares Mostly Low- and Middle-Income Taxpayers
  • Fed holds steady on stimulus, worried by fiscal drag
  • The Fed's QE Exit Will More Than Quadruple Interest Costs For The US
  • What Is YOUR Inflation Rate? 
  • Smart cites: Sustainable solutions for urban living
  • Muzzling Science: How Tories Control The Message
  • The future of business: what are the alternatives to capitalism?
  • A City That Turns Garbage Into Energy Copes With a Shortage
  • What If We Never Run Out of Oil?
  • Running Out of Planet to Exploit
  • Flow of Tainted Water Is Latest Crisis at Japan Nuclear Plant
  • GM joins call for US action on climate change