contagion

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The Emerging Market Contagion Threat

How Turkey & the other EM countries can crash the world
Friday, August 17, 2018, 7:11 PM

Executive Summary

  • The dangers of contagion from Turkey
  • Which other countries pose an even bigger threat?
  • How I'm accelerating my personal preparations
  • Why the next crisis will happen swiftly when it arrives 

If you have not yet read We Are All Lab Rats In The Largest-Ever Monetary Experiment In Human History, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

It's Time To Talk Turkey

“Talking turkey” is an idiom which means to talk serious business or to talk frankly.  So let’s talk Turkey. 

Turkey, the country, is currently in a major currency crisis and heading towards a sovereign debt crisis.  

Its self-inflicted wounds include piling on massive new debts and making a big bet that the US dollar would continue to weaken, which it did not.

The huge predicament facing Turkey is that many of its debts are denominated in dollars and euros. So as the Turkish lira fell, those debts became more and more expensive for their holders to service. Just this year alone, the Turkish lira has fallen by nearly 40%(!) against the dollar.

Imagine that you're a Turk with a mortgage denominated in US dollars. Suppose it was for $200,000 and your payment in local currency was 5,625 lira ($1,500) for the month at the beginning of the year.  Today, your payment would be 9,090 lira (still $1,500) to account for the dollar translation.

Ouch!

That’s happening to businesses and consumers alike across Turkey.  To help ease the pain, the authorities are busy allowing inflation to run rampant which gives people more lira to work with. But that’s a two-edged sword that also causes the value of the lira to continue to fall against external currencies.  So it buys a bit of time, perhaps, at the risk of a full blown currency collapse that leads to a major sovereign debt crisis.

The effects are already rippling through the European banking system. We see that clearly here in... » Read more

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We Are All Lab Rats In The Largest-Ever Monetary Experiment In Human History

And how do things usually work out for the rat?
Friday, August 17, 2018, 7:10 PM

This global flood of freshly-printed 'thin air' money has no parallel in the historical records. All around the world, each of us is part of a grand experiment being conducted without the benefits of either prior experience or controls. Its outcome will be binary: either super-great or spectacularly awful.

If the former, then no worries. We'll just continue to borrow and spend in ever-greater amounts -- forever. Perpetual prosperity for everyone!

But if things hit a breaking point, then you had better be prepared for some truly bad times. » Read more

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What Will Happen When Japan Breaks

Mapping the contagion risk to world markets
Thursday, November 6, 2014, 9:36 AM

Executive Summary

  • The data that proves Japan is a ticking time bomb
  • Why the yen may still fall a lot further from here
  • How Japan's contagion can threaten world markets (and yes, the US)
  • Why the contagion is now underway, and what you should do about it

If you have not yet read Central Planners Are In A State of Panic available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

Japan, By The Numbers

I completely understand why the Japanese authorities are freaking out and taking enormous risks.  It's because they have no good choices left.  More fundamentally (and worse) they are in charge of a system that is destined to fail.

Exponential money systems have to eventually fail because all paper money is just a marker for real wealth, it is not real wealth itself, and therefore ever-increasing exponential paper claims being stacked up  against a world of real wealth that is growing much less quickly (and someday reversing entirely) is a mathematical formula for a monetary accident.

But it's quite bizarre that Japan, of all places, cannot see through to this math predicament given their very publicly and often discussed demographic decline.

Having peaked at 128 million in 2005, Japan now has 127 million inhabitants and is on its way to 90 million by 2050, and 45 million by ~2100.

(Source)

This means that.. » Read more

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The Periphery is Failing

The next big economic dislocation might be only weeks away
Tuesday, August 27, 2013, 4:04 PM

For years we've preached the From the Outside In principle of markets: When trouble starts, it nearly always does so out in the weaker periphery before creeping towards the core.

We saw this in the run-up to the housing bubble collapse, as sub-prime mortgages gave way before prime loans, and in Europe, as smaller economies like Greece, Ireland, and Cyprus have fallen first and hardest (so far).  We see this today in accelerating food stamp use among poorer U.S. households.  In each case, the weaker economic parties give way first before being followed, over time, by the stronger ones.

Using this framework, we can often get several weeks to several months of advance notice before trouble erupts in the next ring closer to the center.

Which makes today notable, as we're receiving a number of new warning signs.  The periphery is giving way. » Read more

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Off the Cuff: Contagion Within Europe

Europe's leaders are resorting to shoddy number tricks a 4th
Sunday, June 17, 2012, 7:15 AM

In this week's Off the Cuff with Mish & Chris podcast, Mish and Chris discuss:

  • Desperate Measures
    • The math behind the latest 'rescue' attempts is so broken it falls apart at first glance
  • How Much Time Do We Have Left?
    • The day of reckoning is approaching, but Europe is showing us we still have time left to act
  • Where to Park Capital
    • The options worth considering grow fewer in number, though Europeans should take action soon

Europe continues to figure prominently in Chris and Mish's minds at the moment. The action there is what's driving the world agenda right now, and the decisions taken to address the European crisis will have tremendous impact on the financial markets around the globe. Much is happening right now -- but for longtime 'Off the Cuff' listeners, it's important to keep in perspective that little has actually changed. Europe's problem is a mathematical one. Too many bad loans were made. In practically every country. Steep losses will need to be taken. Taking those losses will place painful deflationary pressure on asset prices. The key question is: how much new money will central banks print to service and retire those debts?...