commodities

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6 Essential Strategies For Prospering Through The Next Crisis

Be one of the few positioned to prosper when crisis hits
Friday, April 6, 2018, 11:32 PM

Executive Summary

  • The trends that have driven the past 10 years are now ending/over. Ride their reversal wisely.
  • Crisis can destroy or magnify your prospects. Your decisions today will control which outcome you experience.
  • In many cases, you need to do the opposite of what the 'herd' is doing
  • The 6 essential strategies for prospering through the next crisis

If you have not yet read Part 1: This Is The Turning Point, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

Strategies For Prospering Through The Next Crisis

Those with the open-mindedness, courage and optimism to adapt in time will be far less impacted -- and indeed, will have much better odds of coming through this transition the better for it. Amazing opportunities will arise during this time to increase all aspects of your wealth (yes, money -- but also in all the other important Forms Of Capital, too).

Don’t count on currency “money” retaining its purchasing power. 

States (governments) always follow the same pathway: when financial promises can’t be kept, states debauch/devalue their currencies as a politically expedient short-term solution.

But alas, just like central bank stimulus, the short-term expediency becomes the permanent policy, and the unintended consequences start piling up, for example, a loss of trust in the state’s currency.

I see Venezuela’s destruction of its currency as the canary in the coalmine. The first canaries to drop lifeless from their perch will be non-reserve currencies.  Then the weakest of the reserve currencies will be over-issued (via credit rather than actual money-printing) and then even the mightiest will collapse.

Many people reckon the US dollar (USD) is the weakest, and perhaps they’ll be right, but I think the Chinese yuan (RMB), Japanese yen and EU euro will lose purchasing power first.

The RMB isn’t actually a “real currency,” it’s simply a derivative of the USD via the official peg. As for becoming gold-backed, please examine any chart of Chinese debt issuance (all of which is currency) and then compare that to... » Read more

Blog

Van Halen, M&Ms, And The Next Market Downturn

How watching the right indicators will avoid disaster
Friday, September 1, 2017, 7:28 PM

Believe it or not, the rock band Van Halen found a brilliant way to teach how having good indicators is key to achieving success.

This is extremely true for the world of investing, where you're deploying capital based upon an expected future return. How do you determine when it's a good time to enter into an investment? Once in it, how do monitor the conditions supporting your rationale for holding it -- are those changing? And if so, are they getting better or worse? When should you exit the position?

For all of these questions, the better the indicators you use, the more accurate and informed your decision-making will be. And the better your returns as an investor will be. » Read more

Podcast

Lightspring/Shuttestock

Brien Lundin: If They Don't Want You To Own It, You Probably Should

The wisdom (and challenges) of owning safe haven assets
Monday, August 14, 2017, 8:39 PM

One of the most perplexing mysteries to us is that right as the Federal Reserve embarked on QE3 -- which was a huge, enormous, $85 billion a month experiment -- commodities began a multiyear decline within two weeks of that announcement. Concurrently, the world’s central banks plunged the world into steeply negative real interest rates, a condition that has almost always resulted in booming commodity prices -- but not this time. Today, the ratio between commodity prices and equities is at one of, if not the most, extreme points in history.

To explain that gap, we talk this week with Brien Lundin, publisher of Gold Newsletter and producer of the New Orleans Investment Conference (where Chris and Adam are speaking on Oct 25-28): » Read more

Podcast

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New Harbor: A Time For Staying Out Of Harms Way

Preserving your financial capital
Sunday, January 24, 2016, 1:16 PM

Given the brutal start to the markets in the first three weeks of 2016, we thought it a good time to check in with the team at New Harbor Financial. We have had them on our podcast periodically over the past years as the market churned to ever new highs, and have always appreciated their skepticism of these liquidity-driven ""markets"" as well as their unwavering commitment to risk management should the party in stocks end suddenly.

So, how is their risk-managed approach faring now that the S&P 500 has suddenly dropped 8% since Christmas? Quite well. Their general portfolio is flat for the year so far -- evidence that caution, prudence and hedging can indeed preserve capital during market downdrafts.

We've invited the New Harbor team back on this week to hear their latest assessment on the markets, as well as how they're approaching their portfolio positioning moving forward. » Read more

Insider

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From Deflation To Hyperinflation

Expect a market crash followed by helicopter money
Thursday, October 1, 2015, 12:36 AM

Executive Summary

  • China is rolling over
  • Contagion will eventually take down the core economies, including the US
  • We are witnessing a full-blown collapse of the commodity complex
  • Deflation will win the day over the next year, but then get ready for helicopter money hyperinflation

If you have not yet read Part 1: Deflation Warning: The Next Wave available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

The Chinese GDP Lie

Right off the top, China is not growing anywhere near the 7% it claims.  That’s just a politically useful lie that the Chinese tell to the world as much as they tell to themselves.

Fortunately, hardly anyone is falling for that particular fib any longer.  Let’s start with the completely obvious manufacturing slump that has hit China:

Chinese Factory Gauge Slumps to Lowest Level Since March 2009

Sept 22, 2015

A private Chinese manufacturing gauge fell to the lowest in 6 1/2 years, underscoring challenges facing the economy as its old growth engines splutter.

A global sell off in riskier assets gained pace after the preliminary Purchasing Managers’ Index from Caixin Media and Markit Economics dropped to 47.0 in September. That missed the median estimate of 47.5 in a Bloomberg survey and fell from the final reading of 47.3 in the previous month. Readings have remained below 50 since March, indicating contraction.

Premier Li Keqiang’s growth target of about 7 percent for this year is being challenged by a slowdown in manufacturing and exports even as services and consumption show resilience.

(Source)

The way a PMI reading works is anything over 50 indicates expansions and anything under 50 indicates contraction.  Anybody care to explain to me how China can be sporting sub-50 readings every month since March -- that’s five full months -- and still be claiming to be aiming for a 7% annual growth target?  You know, because China is... » Read more

Insider

Off The Cuff: Why Commodities Are Getting Crushed

Reports of econonic growth are 'fluffed-up fakery'
Thursday, July 23, 2015, 8:17 PM

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and John Rubino discuss:

  • The Commodity Beat-Down
    • Why are gold, oil, etc so weak?
  • Fluffed-Up Fakery
    • Official economic reports are just pure fiction these days
  • The End Of The Long Cycle
    • The devastation when this bubble pops will be epic
  • Stock market roll-over?
    • It's increasingly looking like we'll finally see a material correction

Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today. » Read more

Podcast

Jim Rogers: Turmoil Is Coming

Predictions on the markets, gold, Greece & more
Saturday, June 20, 2015, 1:11 PM

Two years since his last interview with us, investor Jim Rogers returns and notes that the risks he warned of last time have only gotten worse. In this week's podcast, Jim shares his rational for predicting:

  • increased wealth confiscation by the central planners
  • a pending major financial market collapse
  • gold's return as the preferred safe haven investment
  • more oil price weakness, followed by a trend reversal
  • Russia's rebound
  • a China bubble reckoning
  • agriculture's long-term value
Podcast

CFTC

Commissioner Bart Chilton: Price Discovery In The Commodities Markets

How "free and fair" is it?
Saturday, March 7, 2015, 4:54 PM

In theory, regulation is supposed to set and enforce the rules of the game that market participants play by, in order to ensure that price discovery remains efficient, effective -- and most important -- fair.

In practice, there's plenty of debate to be had on how successful our regulators are in effecting their mission. And one investment class in particular, commodities, frequently comes under criticism for questionable price action.

So, this week we talk with Bart Chilton, former Commissioner of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), about price discovery within the commodity markets, and whether investors can have confidence in the "fairness" of the current system. » Read more

Podcast

alphaspirit/Shuttestock

David Stockman: The Global Economy Has Entered The Crack-Up Phase

And will be characterized by these 4 developments
Sunday, February 15, 2015, 3:42 PM

Few people understand the global economy and its (mis)management better than David Stockman -- former director of the OMB under President Reagan, former US Representative, best-selling author of The Great Deformation, and veteran financier.

David is now loudly warning that events have entered the crack-up phase, which he predicts will be defined by the following 4 developments: » Read more

Blog

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When Every Country Wants to Sell, Who Buys?

The world is trapped in a quest for 'Demand'
Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 1:14 PM

Understandably for the US, which sustained a consumption supercycle for several decades, the post-financial crisis period has kicked off a new trend: Americans want to consume less, and make more.

Americans want to own less stuff, use less energy, and produce their own goods. In short, Americans want to sell» Read more