BTU

Blog

The Obama Administration's Natural Gas Policy Is Tragically Misguided

Waste that will haunt future generations
Thursday, May 9, 2013, 7:26 PM

The Obama administration has come out in support of the idea of exporting U.S. natural gas.  This stance is counterproductive, short-sighted, and if followed will prove harmful to domestic manufacturing (i.e., value generation) not just now, but for future generations of Americans.

While exporting natural gas would certainly prove to be an economic boon for a very select minority of companies and individuals, it makes no sense from an energy standpoint and undermines our national interests. All it will do is enrich a few, while boosting prices for all domestic consumers and shortchanging the energy and environmental inheritance we pass along to our children. » Read more

Podcast

Gregor Macdonald: What the End of Cheap Oil Means

We better get smart about using our remaining fossil BTUs
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 6:09 PM

On the heels of Chris' recent report clarifying the global net energy predicament, he and PeakProsperity.com contributing editor Gregor Macdonald sit down to talk in depth about the broken relationship between energy costs and economic growth.

For much of the twentieth century, the developed world saw a steady march upwards in wages and living standards, due primarily to huge quantities of cheap, high-yielding liquid hydrocarbon. As we find ourselves bumping along the plateau of Peak Oil's apex, suddenly we find "growth" is a lot harder to come by. » Read more

Blog

San Onofre power plant via the Nuclear Regulatory Agency

The Dawn of the Great California Energy Crash

Like CA, more states will soon ask, "Where will our energy c
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 8:46 PM

California, which imports over 25% of its electricity from out of state, is in no position to lose half (!) of its entire nuclear power capacity. But that’s exactly what happened earlier this year, when the San Onofre plant in north San Diego County unexpectedly went offline. The loss only worsens the broad energy deficit that has made California the most dependent state in the country on expensive, out-of-state power. » Read more

Blog

Coal: The Ignored Juggernaut

The most likely fuel for a world in decline
Thursday, June 28, 2012, 10:46 AM

Oil, natural gas, and alternatives dominate the headlines when it comes to energy. But there's a big and largely-overlooked revolution occuring with the energy source likey to become the most preferred fuel for a world in ecomomic decline: coal.

The United States coal sector has been hit very, very hard this spring. Demand has been crushed by over 10%, as warm weather and bountiful supplies of cheap natural gas have induced power plant operators and all other users where possible to switch away from domestic coal. The rapid change in fortune has sent the stock prices of big, listed names such as Peabody and Arch down by double digit percentages, as the Dow Jones US Coal Index has fallen below 160 from above 225 at the start of 2012. » Read more

Blog

The Race for BTUs

World powers are positioning themselves around where the mos
Tuesday, April 3, 2012, 9:57 PM

The world's major central banks -- including the Bank of Japan (BOJ), the European Central Bank (ECB), and the Federal Reserve -- appear to have finally won a major battle in the deflationary war that broke out five years ago in 2007. While the ultimate victor is yet to be determined, it now seems likely that a period of nominal growth could ensue for another two years, perhaps even longer.

This will not be high-quality growth. And little of the growth will be real.

Commodity prices will surely eat away at most, if not all, of any gains that may occur in global GDP. Additionally, while non-OECD growth actually has a chance of achieving some GDP gains in real terms, the prospects for the OECD are not as encouraging. » Read more