ash

Daily Prep

Wood Ash

Its 10 Survival Uses
Wednesday, December 30, 2015, 6:41 PM

10 reasons to give wood ash from the fireplace or firepit a different label than that as a waste product. 

http://prepforshtf.com/wood-ash-10-survival-uses/#.VoRmNnvOjAK

What Should I Do?

Ashes - © Fixer00 | Dreamstime.com

Uses for Wood Ash

15 ways to use wood ashes around the homestead
Thursday, November 14, 2013, 1:58 PM

With the colder winter months in front of us, fireplaces and woodstoves will start to get more use.  With woodburning, ash is always an end product that needs to be disposed of.  With a little pre-planning and the tips from this article, you can turn a waste product into a valuable resource around the homestead and in the garden. 

Before we begin our discussion of the uses of ash, a special note of caution needs to be mentioned.  Take wood ash away from the woodstove or fire­place in a metal bucket. Never store it in plastic, at least not until the ash is absolutely cool. This way, you avoid burning down buildings (a potentially devastating risk) or damaging surfaces in your house. » Read more

What Should I Do?

Stacked Firewood

Preparing Your Firewood Supply

Choosing, acquiring, preparing, and storing firewood
Thursday, August 22, 2013, 5:15 PM

How to Choose Firewood

In most areas, there are a few preferred species, based on several factors: cost, availability, burn qualities, etc. The species that best meet each of these criteria will vary considerably in different areas of the country.

Generally, the densest (heaviest) dry wood will provide the most heat for any given amount of storage and firebox space. If convenient, the best way to shop for wood would be to figure out the cost per pound. This can be approximated by referring to charts showing the weights of various wood species. Another approach that will yield pretty much the same results is to compare various species' BTU ratings and use it to determine the cost per BTU. Note that this is not necessarily the same as cost per cord. Wet wood will need to be seasoned (cut, split, and stacked) for a year or two before you use it. » Read more