Daily Digest

Daily Digest 3/31 - Gold's Hyperbolic Trajectory, Artificial Leaf Might Provide Energy, Japan Pressured To Expand Evacuation

Wednesday, March 30, 2011, 9:43 AM
  • Waiting Too Long To Tighten Could Fuel Inflation: Bullard
  • Gold Price's Hyperbolic Trajectory
  • All Talk, No Action
  • In Times of Uncertainty, Are Gold Prices Certain?
  • Americans Feather Nests With Silver Eagles
  • Saudi Arabia Prints 1.5m Copies Of Religious Edict Banning Protests
  • Tax The Super-Rich Now Or Face A Revolution
  • Why The Dollar May Make A Comeback
  • Dimon Says a Hundred Municipalities in U.S. Won’t ‘Make It’ Out of Debt
  • Extend And Pretend Is Wall Street's Friend
  • China's Dagong Sees No Threat Of Fed Monetization Ending, Believes "World Credit War" Is About To Escalate
  • "Artificial Leaf" Might Provide Easy, Mobile Energy
  • Renewable Energy A Pillar In Japan Reconstruction Vision: Edano
  • Tokyo Electric Investors May Be Wiped Out After Nuclear Crisis
  • Fukushima Illustrates SmartGrid Need
  • Detailed account of the nuclear crisis of Fukushima at Wikipedia
  • Japan under pressure to expand nuclear evacuation
  • China, Japan join hands in fighting catastrophic quake, tsunami
  • Full Meltdown In Full Swing?
  • Japan nuclear crisis: sea radiation levels reach new high

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Economy

Waiting Too Long To Tighten Could Fuel Inflation: Bullard (Alfredo E.)

Bullard added that now, around 18 months after the end of the U.S. recession, was around the time he expected the economy to pick up and start growing "fairly rapidly".

"Because we are so accommodative right now, the (policy setting) FOMC may not be willing or able to wait until every single global uncertainty is resolved before we can begin normalising policy," Bullard said in a speech at an economic conference in Prague.

Gold Price's Hyperbolic Trajectory (Alfredo E.)

I am not a mathematician, but those knowledgeable about math have explained to me the difference between a parabola and a hyperbola. I’ll cut through the math to get to the key point. A hyperbolic rise in price is much faster than a parabolic one.

This distinction is important because the gold price in recent years has been rising at a hyperbolic rate, which is illustrated in the following chart.

All Talk, No Action (Claire H.)

The good news is that we don’t need the regulators to end the manipulation, even though they should. This crime in progress will end in spite of them refusing to perform their sworn responsibilities. The reality of the artificially depressed price and the developing silver shortage guarantees an abrupt end to the manipulation. This is all the more obvious in the behavior of the big shorts. They are clearly reducing their combined short position (COMEX plus OTC) as much as possible. This should tell you that they expect much higher silver prices and are positioning themselves for it. Unlike the regulators, the manipulators are all action and no talk. Do as they do - buy silver.

In Times of Uncertainty, Are Gold Prices Certain? (Alfredo E.)

"The generalization is, there is no generalization. When there is a catastrophe – people sell everything," said Mark Leibovit, a chief market strategist for VRTrader.com. "I'm not banking on the disasters. When bad news hits, I'm afraid everything will drop," he told Kitco News.

In a March 15 report, HSBC said, "Historically, estimates of drops in commodity demand due to natural disasters or other economy tend to be exaggerated. This was the case with previous earthquakes in Japan, attacks in the US on September 11, 2001, and the 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean."

Americans Feather Nests With Silver Eagles (Alfredo E.)

“Silver’s hot. People want it. People don’t want to have money in the bank,” says Eric Streiner, the shop’s manager. Buyers include everyone from “business executives to lunatics”, he adds.

Saudi Arabia Prints 1.5m Copies Of Religious Edict Banning Protests (David B.)

Saudi Arabia, the world's top oil exporter and a major US ally, is an absolute monarchy that does not tolerate any form of public dissent.

It managed to stifle an attempt to stage a mass protest on 11 March with a large security presence on the streets. Religious scholars issued their fatwa, or religious edict, and senior princes issued warnings in advance.

Tax The Super-Rich Now Or Face A Revolution (David B.)

Warning: The Super-Rich Delusion has pushed us to the edge of a great precipice: Remember the Roaring Twenties? The Crash of 1929? Great Depression? Just days before the crash one leading economist, Irving Fisher, predicted that stocks had “reached what looks like a permanently high plateau.”

Yes, he was trapped in the “Great Gatsby Syndrome,” an earlier version of today’s Super-Rich Delusion. It was so blinding in 1929 that the president, Wall Street, all America were sucked in … until the critical mass hit a mysterious flash point, triggering the crash.

Why The Dollar May Make A Comeback (Dana T.)

At the heart of the negative greenback story is the shifting short-term interest-rate environment. The U.S. is maintaining a super-easy monetary policy which includes record, rock-bottom short-term rates with a quantitative easing kicker. At the same time, other central banks are starting to make moves to raise short-term rates and exit emergency measures started in the wake of the financial crisis.

Currency speculators tend to favor money that pays better returns, and right now holding the dollar pays you nothing, and will pay less than that if it continues to drift lower.

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Dimon Says a Hundred Municipalities in U.S. Won’t ‘Make It’ Out of Debt (SolidSwede)

“I wouldn’t panic about what I’m about to say,” Dimon, 55, said today at a U.S. Chamber of Commerce event in Washington. “You’re going to see some municipalities not make it. I don’t think it’s going to shatter America, I just think it’s a part of the credit cycle.”

Extend And Pretend Is Wall Street's Friend (JimQ)

The storyline that has been sold to the public by the Federal government, Wall Street, and the corporate mainstream media over the last two years is the economy is recovering and the banking system has recovered from its near death experience in 2008. Wall Street profits in 2009 & 2010 totaled approximately $80 billion. The stock market has risen almost 100% since the March 2009 lows. Wall Street CEOs were so impressed by this fantastic performance they dished out $43 billion in bonuses over the two year period to their thousands of Harvard MBA paper pushers. It is amazing that an industry that was effectively insolvent in October 2008 has made such a spectacular miraculous recovery. The truth is recovery is simple when you control the politicians and regulators, and own the organization that prints the money.

China's Dagong Sees No Threat Of Fed Monetization Ending, Believes "World Credit War" Is About To Escalate (pinecarr)

Full selection from Dagong's report on the question of US monetary policy:

“The United States, as the biggest country involved in sovereign debt crisis around the world, will continue its quantitative easing policy when the country is in danger, and the world credit war will be escalated due to the overflow of US dollars…”

Energy

"Artificial Leaf" Might Provide Easy, Mobile Energy (David B.)

The leaf, a silicon-based square the size of a playing card, closely mimics the way plants use the process of photosynthesis to create energy. The device is dropped into a bucket of water, or even a muddy puddle, and placed in direct sunlight.

"Leaves are buzzing with electricity," said Daniel Nocera, a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who heads the research, "they just don't have any wires in them." Neither does the artificial leaf.

Tokyo Electric Investors May Be Wiped Out After Nuclear Crisis (guardia)

Tokyo Electric has tumbled more than 70 percent, the worst performer on the MSCI World (MXWO) Index, since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami knocked out cooling systems at the Fukushima Dai- Ichi nuclear plant and caused radiation to leak. Should the crisis persist, the company may be unable to repay bondholders and be taken over by the government, Merrill said.

Renewable Energy A Pillar In Japan Reconstruction Vision: Edano (guardia)

Renewable energy will play an important role in Japan's reconstruction, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said on Tuesday as the country struggled to bring a damaged nuclear power plant under control.

"When considering the damage from this accident, there is no doubt we are moving towards making renewable energy sources a pillar," Edano told reporters.

Fukushima Illustrates SmartGrid Need (guardia)

There are, of course, lessons to be learned from the incidents at Fukushima, which go well beyond the subject of nuclear plant design. The first and most important lesson is one about character. The discipline, stoicism and courage with which the Japanese people have borne their trials have been truly inspirational. I suspect that all things Japanese will soon become quite fashionable in the United States and will remain so for some time.

Detailed account of the nuclear crisis of Fukushima at Wikipedia (guardia)

Evidence arose of partial core meltdown in reactors 1, 2, and 3; hydrogen explosions destroyed the upper cladding of the buildings housing reactors 1, 3, and 4; an explosion damaged the containment inside reactor 2; and multiple fires broke out at reactor 4. In addition, spent fuel rods stored in spent fuel pools of units 1–4 began to overheat as water levels in the pools dropped. Fears of radiation leaks led to a 20 kilometres (12 mi) radius evacuation around the plant. Workers at the plant suffered radiation exposure and were temporarily evacuated at various times. On 18 March, Japanese officials designated the magnitude of the danger at reactors 1, 2 and 3 at level 5 on the 7 point International Nuclear Event Scale (INES).[5] Power was restored to parts of the plant from 20 March, but machinery damaged by floods, fires and explosions remained inoperable.[6]

Japan under pressure to expand nuclear evacuation (pinecarr)

More than 70,000 people have been evacuated from the 20-km ring. Another 136,000 who live in a 10-km (6-mile) band beyond that have been encouraged to leave or to stay indoors.

Environment

China, Japan join hands in fighting catastrophic quake, tsunami (pinecarr)

China and Japan, whose historical ties can be described as shaky at best, have drawn closer in the face of Japan's recent 9.0-magnitude quake and ensuing tsunami.

Full Meltdown In Full Swing? (guardia)

n Japan, radiation levels in the seawater near the Fukushima plant continue to rise. They're now more than 3.5 thousand times higher than normal. Radioactive material has also been detected in soil at the facility. Japan's government described the situation as serious and unpredictable. Workers have been unsuccessfully trying to restore the plant's cooling system, in what is now the worst atomic crisis since Chernobyl. There's been some debate over whether there are any similarities between the two events. RT talks to Professor Christopher Busby, of the European Committee on Radiation Risks.

Japan nuclear crisis: sea radiation levels reach new high (pinecarr)

The level of radioactive iodine in the sea off Japan's disaster-hit Fukushima nuclear plant has soared to its highest reading yet, reaching 4,385 times the legal limit.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

18 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Posts: 4060
Food Commodities Surge Seen Swamping Consumers With Inflation

"Coffee, sugar and cocoa prices will rise five- to 10-fold by 2014 because of shortages that will mean consumers getting “swamped” by food inflation, according to Superfund Financial.

A lack of farmland and rising costs means growers will fail to keep up with demand, said Aaron Smith, managing director of Superfund Financial (Hong Kong) Ltd. and Superfund USA Inc. Commodities account for about 40 percent of Superfund’s $1.25 billion assets under management. Smith correctly predicted record copper prices in November and a month later rightly anticipated that silver would outperform gold. "

  • Other news, headlines and opinion:

 

Portuguese Notes Slump for 9th Day; Bunds Slide on Inflation

Official: Quake, tsunami could cost Japan $300 billion

Bill Gross Says U.S. Is 'Out-Greeking the Greeks' on Debt

Anglo Irish Bank confirms $25 billion 2010 loss

Greece May Need to Break Taboo on Selling Land to Slash Debt

Schools potentially face tremendous cuts (California)

Jefferson County Attempts to Avoid Bankruptcy

'Cash Poor' Montebello on Verge of Bankruptcy

Tampa Bay office vacancy rates at 27-year high

La. plan to use prison sales to plug gaps doubted

BRIEF-Moody's dwngrds Tokyo Electric to Baa1, rtgs remain on rvw

Moody's Signals More Euro-Nation Downgrades Possible on ESM

Agencies could stop rating risky EU states - sources

DPS reorganization: 59 schools could be chartered, closed or transformed

Minnesota Senate OKs cutting 15 percent of state workforce

Bill to tap Rainy Day Fund before Texas House

Long Beach's budget woes seem to have no end in sight.

Firefighters: Houston mayor would cut 300 jobs over pensions

rhare's picture
rhare
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Posts: 1323
Another warm and fuzzy completely misleading solar article...

[quote=Tiffany Stecker in Article "Artificial Leaf" Might Provide Easy, Mobile Energy]

An artificial "leaf" that collects energy in much the same way as a natural one could provide a day's worth of power for homes without access to an electricity grid.

...

Nocera says this leaf could provide up to 30 kilowatt-hours of electricity per day, on par with the typical American household's electricity use, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Quote:

I don't think so!  My opinion of Scientific American just took a blow based on this article.

The leaf, a silicon-based square the size of a playing card,

Quote:

Nocera says this leaf could provide up to 30 kilowatt-hours of electricity per day, on par with the typical American household's electricity use, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

They very clearly in this article try to make it look like 1 artificial leaf the size of a playing card (2.5" x 3.5" = .005645 sq. meters) will generate 30 kWh.  If we look at the maximum energy available in Tuscon, AZ with tracking that keeps the leaf perpendicular to the sun throughout the day, we find the solar isolation (total energy from the sun) during the best part of the year striking the surface is about 12.3 kWh/m2/day).  So for a playing card size object that converts 100% of the energy, you can expect to get in May, with tracker, in Tuscon,AZ  (a very sunny place):

12.3kWh * .005645 sq. meters = .07 kWh, or about 1/500 the typical American household

And those numbers above are very very conservative, since some months you would get 1/2 that energy available in Tuscon, and I suspect at best your getting 50% conversion, so in reality it much more like 1/1000 - 1/10,000.

Any article that is off by 4-5 orders of magnitude is just plain misleading.

 

bound2chng's picture
bound2chng
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Dimon Says a Hundred Municipalities in U.S. Won’t ‘Make It’ Out

This may sound a bit naïve … Can someone help me out here?  What does it mean for a municipality to go belly up?  It’s not like a corporation that just closes its doors is it doors.  There are still taxpaying residents so what happens to them??

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Poet
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Gold: Hyerbolic Or Just The Ascending Side Of A Bubble?

Regarding the following article linked to above:

Gold Price's Hyperbolic Trajectory
http://www.stockhouse.com/Columnists/2011/Mar/29/Gold-price-s-hyperbolic...

I have to ask. Is it currency devaluation or is it something akin to the housing bubble?

The reason I ask is, yes the Fed is printing out money to finance government debt. At the same time, while the prices of things have risen, they have not risen as fast as gold has.

So I'd love to hear:

1. Is it because we're gonna head into hyperinflation and the prices of goods haven't caught up yet though they're also rising? Meaning that the other prices are still lagging behind gold?
2. Or are we in a bubble and that means the hyperbolic chart is about to crash down the other side?

What do you think?

Poet

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Arthur Robey
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Oops

I hope the good professor Busby is a raving lunatic.

Unfortunatly he seems to have his facilties intact.

Rossies device anyone?

http://www.lenr-canr.org/News.htm

Please fasten your seatbelts. It is going to get rough.

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DRHolden
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Dimon Says a Hundred Municipalities in U.S. Won’t ‘Make It’ Out
bound2chng wrote:

This may sound a bit naïve … Can someone help me out here?  What does it mean for a municipality to go belly up?  It’s not like a corporation that just closes its doors is it doors.  There are still taxpaying residents so what happens to them??

Was wondering the same. I'm assuming it just means a bail out by the state, which will then mean a bailout by the Fed Gov't, and us.

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twice the evacuation distance

Dangerous Levels of Radioactive Isotope Found 25 Miles From Nuclear Plant — A long-lasting radioactive element has been measured at levels that pose a long-term danger at one spot 25 miles from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, raising questions about whether Japan1’s evacuation zone should be expanded and whether the land might need to be abandoned.  The isotope, cesium 137, was measured in one village by the International Atomic Energy Agency2 at a level exceeding the standard that the Soviet Union used as a gauge to recommend abandoning land surrounding the Chernobyl reactor, and at another location not precisely identified by the agency at more than double the Soviet standard.

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Hyperbol
Poet wrote:

Regarding the following article linked to above:

Gold Price's Hyperbolic Trajectory
http://www.stockhouse.com/Columnists/2011/Mar/29/Gold-price-s-hyperbolic...

I have to ask. Is it currency devaluation or is it something akin to the housing bubble?

The reason I ask is, yes the Fed is printing out money to finance government debt. At the same time, while the prices of things have risen, they have not risen as fast as gold has.

So I'd love to hear:

1. Is it because we're gonna head into hyperinflation and the prices of goods haven't caught up yet though they're also rising? Meaning that the other prices are still lagging behind gold?
2. Or are we in a bubble and that means the hyperbolic chart is about to crash down the other side?

What do you think?

Poet

I think he forgot to adjust his scale in relation to the dollar inflation (real inflation). With just the (fuzzy) CPI the dollar has lost 25% in that same time period. I'd like to see John Williams at Shadowstats redo that chart.

Your #1 is more accurate and #2 is not here yet.

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Fed's Data Dump Leaves

Fed's Data Dump Leaves Investors in the Dark http://www.cnbc.com/id/42360510

 

Getty Images

The Federal Reserve released an avalanche of files Thursday detailing—for the first time ever—its loans to banks under its emergency funding facility known as the “discount window.”

But investors and bank customers won’t find it very useful.

The disclosure came in the form of computer disks handed to reporters in Washington, DC. Those disks contained nearly 900 PDF files that must be individually opened and read. The files include tables with loans made by the Fed, as well as emails between Federal Reserve officials. The disks aren’t searchable and the Fed didn’t include an index.

The release of the data in such a user-unfriendly manner is reminiscent of the way Goldman Sachs dumped tens of thousands of documents on the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission. The commissioners publicly scolded the investment bank for the document “dump.”

The Fed has long kept the identities of borrowers a closely guarded secret. The Fed argued that naming borrowers would discourage banks from borrowing under the window—which the Fed believes is an important source of stability for banks during periods of financial stress.

Thursday’s release was ordered by the federal courts after Bloomberg and Fox News brought the Fed to court over the issue of disclosure.

Going forward, Dodd-Frank requires the Fed to release the names of discount-window borrowers—but only after a two-year delay. That means the information will always be old. Investors and customers of banks will not know which institutions borrowed from the discount window until long after the fact.

We’ll have a more complete historical record—but investors hoping for more transparency about the health of banks will have to look elsewhere.

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The disclosure came in the

The disclosure came in the form of computer disks handed to reporters in Washington, DC. Those disks contained nearly 900 PDF files that must be individually opened and read. The files include tables with loans made by the Fed, as well as emails between Federal Reserve officials. The disks aren’t searchable and the Fed didn’t include an index.

While I haven't see the files myself, so I'm not sure if they are text searchable PDF's or not, Foxit Reader allows you to search through all PDF's in a given folder. I have used it to search through 50 or so PDF's in a folder at a time. The search was pretty much instant. Depending on how the PDF's are saved they still could be searched in such a manner.

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Gold and Silver

To get a true idea of the worth of Gold and Silver, one needs to look at what it would buy now and historically. In the mid 1930s a car could be purchased for around $700 in the then circulating currency when gold was around $24 to $32 an ounce and silver was fixed at about 1 16th the value of gold. Using $32, a car could be purchased for around 20 ounces of gold or $640 dollars. If you multiply $1420 (the current gold price) times 20 you get $28,400, and that is at the lower range of a new car today. Silver dollars contained about .72 ounces of silver, so 700 contained about 500 ounces of silver. 500 times $37 (the current pricce of silver) per ounce comes out at about 18,500. So both gold and silver are lower in purchasing power today than they were when we were on the gold standard.

This makes me believe that gold is around $400/oz under valued today (minimum) and silver about $35/oz under valued (minimum). At 1800/oz, 20 ounces would equal $36,000, a decent price for a car, and at 72/oz, 500*72 would give $36,000 again.

A silver dime at your local coin shop will bring around $2.00 to $2.20. You can still buy a loaf of bread for that at your local supermarket, and in the thirtys, it would buy a loaf of bread then too, although your better brand name bread is around a dollar more today. So a dime selling for $3.50 would be about the right price.

Gold and silver have varied greatly in purchasing power over the last 80 years as the dollar has waxed and waned in it's purchasing power and in it's exchange value for those precious metals, but they tend to stay pretty constant in purchasing power, especially in critical times.

Just a thought.

 

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What does it mean for a municipality to go belly up?
DRHolden wrote:
bound2chng wrote:

This may sound a bit naïve … Can someone help me out here?  What does it mean for a municipality to go belly up?  It’s not like a corporation that just closes its doors is it doors.  There are still taxpaying residents so what happens to them??

Was wondering the same. I'm assuming it just means a bail out by the state, which will then mean a bailout by the Fed Gov't, and us.

cleveland was put into bankruptcy when it refused to sell the muni power plant to the banksters...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Kucinich#Cleveland_mayoralty.2C_1977.E2.80.931979

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Poet
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I'm Not Sure I Like The Car Analogy

Pwoody82

Thank you for replying.

My concern is, when I compare the Model T versus the Ford Focus, I believe the modern car's number of parts, warranty coverage, parts complexity, overhead cost base (executive salaries, retiree pension and health benefits, etc.), and so on, tell me a car would not be suitable for baseline measurement.

How about men's suits? A man's two-piece double-breasted suit was around $19.75 in 1930s New York. An ordinary off-the-rack suit (includes some mechanization, much as many things in society are cheaper due to mechanization) today with alterations, would be $600.

So roughly 30 times increase... If so, the price of gold was $35 an ounce in 1935. So, VERY roughly, $1000 for an ounce of gold today if multiplied by 30? With some extra to account for money printing, less gold relative to a higher population, maybe $1,400? Hmm. Still difficult to really compare.

As for those who use charts of gold versus the dollar or euro to show the devaluation of dollars - well the same chart could be used with average home prices versus the dollar or euro to show the devaluation of dollars versus house prices back in 2006... It still doesn't tell me enough.

Then again, you look at Weimar Germany or recently in Zimbabwe, and you realize that just because gold goes parabolic or hyperbolic, doesn't mean it'll crash...

Poet

pwoody82 wrote:

To get a true idea of the worth of Gold and Silver, one needs to look at what it would buy now and historically. In the mid 1930s a car could be purchased for around $700 in the then circulating currency when gold was around $24 to $32 an ounce and silver was fixed at about 1 16th the value of gold. Using $32, a car could be purchased for around 20 ounces of gold or $640 dollars. If you multiply $1420 (the current gold price) times 20 you get $28,400, and that is at the lower range of a new car today. Silver dollars contained about .72 ounces of silver, so 700 contained about 500 ounces of silver. 500 times $37 (the current pricce of silver) per ounce comes out at about 18,500. So both gold and silver are lower in purchasing power today than they were when we were on the gold standard.

This makes me believe that gold is around $400/oz under valued today (minimum) and silver about $35/oz under valued (minimum). At 1800/oz, 20 ounces would equal $36,000, a decent price for a car, and at 72/oz, 500*72 would give $36,000 again.

A silver dime at your local coin shop will bring around $2.00 to $2.20. You can still buy a loaf of bread for that at your local supermarket, and in the thirtys, it would buy a loaf of bread then too, although your better brand name bread is around a dollar more today. So a dime selling for $3.50 would be about the right price.

Gold and silver have varied greatly in purchasing power over the last 80 years as the dollar has waxed and waned in it's purchasing power and in it's exchange value for those precious metals, but they tend to stay pretty constant in purchasing power, especially in critical times.

Just a thought.

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What Constitution? The times

What Constitution? The times are a changen....

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Peter Schiff Silver

Peter Schiff Silver

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Another warm and fuzzy completely misleading solar article...
rhare wrote:

They very clearly in this article try to make it look like 1 artificial leaf the size of a playing card (2.5" x 3.5" = .005645 sq. meters) will generate 30 kWh.  If we look at the maximum energy available in Tuscon, AZ with tracking that keeps the leaf perpendicular to the sun throughout the day, we find the solar isolation (total energy from the sun) during the best part of the year striking the surface is about 12.3 kWh/m2/day).  So for a playing card size object that converts 100% of the energy, you can expect to get in May, with tracker, in Tuscon,AZ  (a very sunny place):

12.3kWh * .005645 sq. meters = .07 kWh, or about 1/500 the typical American household

And those numbers above are very very conservative, since some months you would get 1/2 that energy available in Tuscon, and I suspect at best your getting 50% conversion, so in reality it much more like 1/1000 - 1/10,000.

Any article that is off by 4-5 orders of magnitude is just plain misleading.

I'm glad you picked this up too rhare.......  because it's total BS like this that gives people false hopes about business as usual continuing under the new technological world order.  And thanks for doing the sums for me!  Maybe it's an April Fool's day joke?

Mike

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rhare
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Not an April Fool....
Damnthematrix wrote:

Maybe it's an April Fool's day joke?

I actually went back to check, just in case I was being made a fool, but sadly, it's a "real" story. Frown   So many stories about solar assume it's like computer processors, that you can just keep increasing output without taking into account the physical limit of the energy from the sun hitting a given surface area.  Anyway, with our system it works out to be just a little over 1 kWh/day/m2, or about 0.1 kWh/day/ft2 which are quick and easy values for validating solar claims.

While researching/thinking about this I came across this interesting article on wikipedia about efficiencies of plants:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photosynthetic_efficiency

 

 

 

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Hey, Dogs-in-a-Pile, whaddy ya think?

I'd love Dogs-in-A -Pile to chime in on this article posted by another commenter, as it is nuclear. http://www.lenr-canr.org/News.htm

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