Daily Digest

Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May Add Treasury Market Dealers, Flood Concern for Coal Prices

Tuesday, January 4, 2011, 12:00 PM
  • China BRICS up Africa
  • Manipulated Monday – New Year Starts with a Bang
  • The Oil – Employment Link, Part 1
  • Researchers Find "Alarming" Decline In Bumblebees
  • Fed Likely To Add New Treasury Market Dealers
  • Overheating East to Falter Before the Bankrupt West Recovers
  • Australia Flood Is Concern For Coal Prices, A Commodities Lesson

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Economy

China BRICS up Africa (pinecarr)



There can be no two opinions that Beijing made a smart move. Its decision to anoint South Africa as a new member of BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) will be projected as based on economic grounds, but there are any number of other dimensions. The decision was hugely significant politically, and its announcement showed delightful timing - Christmas Eve. It also has vast geopolitical potential and it is undoubtedly based on strategic considerations. The choice of South Africa can even be spotted as a gutsy move to disprove a prediction from Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management and guru of the BRIC concept, that Nigeria was better placed to make the grade

Manipulated Monday – New Year Starts with a Bang (ilene)



The good news is though, that that will also make Billions of more dollars available to terrorist and that will give us a great justifications to keep spending $1,000,000,000,000 per year on the military without any cutbacks at all while we strip-mine all those horrible social safety-net programs that dare to give downtrodden Americans hope.  Of course the stock market futures are loving this and the Dow, at 7:45, looks like it will open up 100 points as the combination of a weak dollar and a weak President is the investing class's fondest wish for the New Year.  

The Oil – Employment Link, Part 1 (bill)



From what I can see, oil consumption and employment are very closely linked. It is this link that seems to be contributing to the unemployment problems we have now in the US. Going forward, we know that the US is heavily dependent on oil imports. If these drop, either because world oil production is dropping, or because world oil production is close to flat, and the US is being outbid for the oil, then it seems likely that employment in the United States will drop even more.

Researchers Find "Alarming" Decline In Bumblebees (adam)



In recent years, experts have documented a disappearance of bees in what is widely called colony collapse disorder, blamed on many factors including parasites, fungi, stress, pesticides and viruses. But most studies have focused on honeybees. Bumblebees are also important pollinators, Cameron said, but are far less studied. Bumblebees pollinate tomatoes, blueberries and cranberries, she noted.

Fed Likely To Add New Treasury Market Dealers (pinecarr)



After a hiatus of more than one year, the Federal Reserve is likely to expand a select group of dealers to help with hefty Treasury debt sales and the central bank's monetary-policy operations, according to traders and dealers familiar with the matter. Demand for safe-haven Treasurys has eased over the past couple of months as optimism over the economic outlook sparked more buying interest in riskier assets such as stocks. That means dealers need to play a bigger

Overheating East to Falter Before the Bankrupt West Recovers (pinecarr)



The East-West trade and capital imbalances that lay behind the Great Recession are as toxic as ever. Surplus states are still exporting excess capacity with rigged currencies -- the yuan-dollar peg for China and, more subtly, the D-Mark-Latin peg within EMU for Germany. Dangerously high budget deficits of 6pc, 8pc, or 10pc of GDP in countries with dangerously high public debts near 100pc may have prevented an acute depression, but they have not prevented the weakest rebound since World War Two, and they cannot continue, whatever the assurances of New Keynesians and pied pipers of debt.

Energy

Australia Flood Is Concern For Coal Prices, A Commodities Lesson (terry)



There is a significant coal shortage in China, and there is no immediate relief for the problem. China is a major consumer of coal just as its is of crude oil. Demand from the world’s second largest economy by GDP will push up prices. The cost of coal to industry in China is underwritten by the central government. That means China will either have to take larger losses or pass prices on to the private sector. The coal mine problem in Australia could have an immediate effect on steel prices. The island nation produces about half of the world’s coking cola for the steel industry.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to [email protected]. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

32 Comments

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

"NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The number of Americans filing for bankruptcy in 2010 ticked up 9% over the previous year to more than 1.53 million, industry groups said Monday.

The number of consumers filing for bankruptcy has increased each year since 2005, when bankruptcy laws were revamped, according to the American Bankruptcy Institute and the National Bankruptcy Research Center.

The 2010 figure far outpaces the 1,407,788 total consumer filings that were recorded during 2009, a trend that the American Bankruptcy Institute attributes to high debt and a stagnant economy.

"The steady climb of consumer filings notwithstanding the 2005 bankruptcy law restrictions demonstrate that families continue to turn to bankruptcy as a result of high debt burdens and stagnant income growth," ABI Executive Director Samuel Gerdano said in a statement."

  • Other news, headlines and opinion:

 

Overheating East to falter before the bankrupt West recovers  (Ambrose Evans-Pritchard)

Eurozone inflation spikes to 2.2 percent in December, above European Central Bank's target

VAT rise necessary, says Osborne (UK)

NY's Cuomo Weighs $2.1 Billion Medicaid Spending Cut, WSJ Says ("may ask for additional federal aid")

Half Moon Bay Faces Insolvency (California)

Housing Prices Face Potential Of Double Digit Decline In 2011

Neb. lawmakers face crippling 2-year budget crunch

Issuance Plunges 91% From Year Ago as Build America Bonds End: Muni Credit

S&P warns on 'shadow inventory' ("major drag on prices for a few more years")

Parking ticket revenue eyed to balance SFMTA's budget (San Francisco)

Japan PM calls for sales tax hike debate

Regulators: Completed Foreclosures in Q3 Up 57% from Year Ago

Scott Takes Office Pledging 5% Florida Workforce Reduction to Cut Deficit

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Why the current depression doesn't look like the the 1930's

I see three big differences on why the current situation doesn't look as bad as it did in the 1930's, but in reality it's as bad or worse.

1.  Soup lines.  I think everyone is familiar with the famous black and white photos of people lined up around the block waiting in soup lines for food.  Well, we don't see that today but what we do see is 41 million (yes 41 million) people living on food stamps.  Can you image the length of that line????  Unfortunately, the statistic doesn't make the visual image impact of people standing around in the cold, but our current state is no less dire.

2. Unemployment.  It seems now we are willing to pay unemployment benefits forever.  Extension after extension and this is again masking the problem of how things are as bad if not worse than the 1930s.  Someday the benefits will run out and people will need to find work again.

3. FDIC.  It's didn't exist back then.  When they closed a bank and u had money in it, tough cookies.  I think we had like 140 bank closures in 2010.  The FDIC is broke and again the problem isn't visible because the insurance covers the depositors, but that insurance money comes from some where.  It's going to get borrowed or printed.

 

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

One Minute Macro Update:  http://www.zerohedge.com/article/one-minute-macro-update-11
Frontrunning 1/4:  http://www.zerohedge.com/article/frontrunning-january-4-0
Today's Economic Events:  http://www.zerohedge.com/article/todays-economic-events-2
The U.S. Mint Reports Another 1,696,000 Silver Eagles Sold:  http://www.caseyresearch.com/gsd/edition/us-mint-reports-another-1696000...

--
1/4/11
KWN - World’s Richest Man Entering Silver Gaining Momentum  http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2011/1/4_KWN...

COT Update to Graphs  http://www.gotgoldreport.com/2011/01/cot-update-to-graphs.html

Likely new White House chief of staff has bided time at Morgan Chase (links to Bloomberg article)  http://www.gata.org/node/9477
Competitive devaluations continue as Chile weakens peso against dollar (links to Bloomberg article)  http://www.gata.org/node/9476

1/3/11
The Outlook for 2011 - James Turk  http://www.fgmr.com/outlook-for-2011.html

The Reweighting of Commodity Indices - Dan Norcini  http://jsmineset.com/2011/01/03/the-reweighting-of-commodity-indices/

Global Market Wrap-Up  http://www.europac.net/global_market_wrap_up/january_3_2011

The Peter Schiff Show
Tonight's guest is Rick Santelli, Chicago-based CNBC correspondent, on the fight over raising the debt ceiling, where interest rates are headed in 2011, and whether the tea-party movement he fathered will have any impact in the new Congress.
http://www.schiffradio.com/f/loop
http://www.schiffradio.com/

Exclusive - Weekly Poll of Bank Positions in Currencies  http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2011/1/3_Exc...

1/2/11 - European nations begin seizing private pensions  http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/The-Adam-Smith-Institute-Blog/2011/010...

12/31/10 - Runaway commodity prices are causing calls for corn rationing to begin: http://www.agweb.com/article/corn_rationing_needs_to_begin/
via http://twitter.com/chrismartenson on 1/3/11

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Re the Alarming Decline in Bees ...something not often mentioned when talking about this is the lack of good bee pasture; bees need a fairly continuous food supply, from the first thaw till the time they hibernate...before herbicides, they could depend on weeds growing in with the crop plants...honeybees may be trucked in when a crop is in bloom, then trucked to another crop later, so they have a continuous food supply...and they store quite a bit of honey for periods of dearth...but native pollinators like bumblebees wont survive in one crop landscapes...

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Boy, that monoculture thing bites back in a lot of ways.

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What's Wrong With The Bees?
rjs wrote:

Re the Alarming Decline in Bees ...something not often mentioned when talking about this is the lack of good bee pasture; bees need a fairly continuous food supply, from the first thaw till the time they hibernate...before herbicides, they could depend on weeds growing in with the crop plants...honeybees may be trucked in when a crop is in bloom, then trucked to another crop later, so they have a continuous food supply...and they store quite a bit of honey for periods of dearth...but native pollinators like bumblebees wont survive in one crop landscapes...

rjs,

You jogged my memory of this piece by 60 Minutes from two years ago : -

~ VF ~

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

About the story of What Wrong with The Bees, all of the reasons they list for the drop in bee population sound logical but I also wonder about bees being released on GMO crops and what effect that may have on the bee population? Interesting.

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Re: Why the current depression doesn't look like the the ...

"2. Unemployment.  It seems now we are willing to pay unemployment benefits forever."

Not quite. Benefits are running out for as many as 4 million 99ers 2011. See this article.

 

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Re: What's Wrong With The Bees?
Vanityfox451 wrote:

rjs,

You jogged my memory of this piece by 60 Minutes from two years ago : -

~ VF ~

VF, i once subscribed to 2 bee journals, but i havent kept up with the literature for a couple years, so i dont know if there are new theories; the last i recall implicated israeli acute paralysis virus in combination with varroa mites...in the 80s & 90s i ran 2-3 dozen hives, but about 10 years ago my colonies were devasted by varroa & tracheal mites, and ive been running less than a half dozen since...

when i first heard of CCD, i was skeptical; i had never seen it, so i thought others were missing something obvious...not any more; this past spring, all the bees in a perfectly healthy hive disappeared on me...

im in a wetlands surrounded by 5 sq.miles of watershed preserve and nature conservancy land; some corn is planted for the wildlife, but no pesticides are used, so the pesticide theories dont carry much weight with me...

reply edited to add this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_of_the_honey_bee

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Something's killing bats too, and ash trees and chestnut trees and beech trees and maples and amphibians and songbirds and numerous sea creatures...  We're creating an uglier world than we inherited.

Doug

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...
sundown wrote:

About the story of What Wrong with The Bees, all of the reasons they list for the drop in bee population sound logical but I also wonder about bees being released on GMO crops and what effect that may have on the bee population? Interesting.

Sundown,

Oh boy, how passionate am I!!! Watch these and tell me you aren't on the same page : -

~ VF ~

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Re: What's Wrong With The Bees?
rjs wrote:
Vanityfox451 wrote:

rjs,

You jogged my memory of this piece by 60 Minutes from two years ago : -

~ VF ~

VF, i once subscribed to 2 bee journals, but i havent kept up with the literature for a couple years, so i dont know if there are new theories; the last i recall implicated israeli acute paralysis virus in combination with varroa mites...in the 80s & 90s i ran 2-3 dozen hives, but about 10 years ago my colonies were devasted by varroa & tracheal mites, and ive been running less than a half dozen since...

when i first heard of CCD, i was skeptical; i had never seen it, so i thought others were missing something obvious...not any more; this past spring, all the bees in a perfectly healthy hive disappeared on me...

im in a wetlands surrounded by 5 sq.miles of watershed preserve and nature conservancy land; some corn is planted for the wildlife, but no pesticides are used, so the pesticide theories dont carry much weight with me...

reply edited to add this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_of_the_honey_bee

rjs,

The USDA released its 2010 progress report on the subject of Honey Bee Colony Collapse in June 2010.

This is a link to a PDF of that report.

There is also a website dedicated in producing up-to-date information on the situation at : -

http://www.extension.org/bee%20health%29

From what I've come to understand so far, it is a combination of parasite and pesticide, but with the study inconclusive, we are still left to speculate so far.

In speculation then, my conclusion is strongly along the lines of pesticide usage, even if your own colony is a good distance from chemical agriculture. I support the conclusion that parasite movement over great distances can be achieved intergenerationally over time, for which I could also assume that the results of pesticides removing predatory species in one respect, have promoted another, along with the chemical effects as toxin for both the reduction of varroa & tracheal mites.

Any organisations that can produce a self terminating seed for profit are to me a devilment upon nature, and are acting for their own profit and welfare, not our own. As such, companies such as Monsanto produce insecticides to support these seeds for short and medium term gain. Whatever happens to the next 3, 4 or 5 human generations is anyones guess, as the profit made on short term gain would have already been spent or invested by a present and previous generation of human who will be long dead before the full explanation of cause and effect comes to light.

This is of course my own viewpoint ...

~ VF ~

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

"Something's killing bats too, and ash trees and chestnut trees and beech trees and maples and amphibians and songbirds and numerous sea creatures..." 

Must be caused by humans, those dinosaurs sure were lucky that humans were not there when they were or the humans would have killed them too.

"We're creating an uglier world than we inherited."

Speak for yourself, Doug

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Re: What's Wrong With The Bees?
Vanityfox451 wrote:

Any organisations that can produce a self terminating seed for profit are to me a devilment upon nature, and are acting for their own profit and welfare, not our own. As such, companies such as Monsanto produce insecticides to support these seeds for short and medium term gain. Whatever happens to the next 3, 4 or 5 human generations is anyones guess, as the profit made on short term gain would have already been spent or invested by a present and previous generation of human who will be long dead before the full explanation of cause and effect comes to light.

This is of course my own viewpoint ...

~ VF ~

just to make it clear, that i agree with you here...my comment about about being skeptical about pesticide theories re CCD applied specifically to my personal situation...

& thanx for the link...

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Re: Why the current depression doesn't look like the the ...
alcatwize wrote:

I see three big differences on why the current situation doesn't look as bad as it did in the 1930's, but in reality it's as bad or worse.

2. Unemployment.  It seems now we are willing to pay unemployment benefits forever.  Extension after extension and this is again masking the problem of how things are as bad if not worse than the 1930s.  Someday the benefits will run out and people will need to find work again.

alcatwize,
 
With this sentence: "Someday the benefits will run out and people will need to find work again" you make it sounds like there are plenty of jobs available out there and people don't take it because they prefer to enjoy their unemployment check. Really? Is it what's happening? So a few years ago we had 5 to 6% unemployment in the US, today we are at 10% so if I follow the logic 4% to 5% of the population just became lazy in the last few years?
 
I did personally witness somebody close to me who took a contractor job for less money that his unemployment benefit, not even counting the cost for commuting. Being without a job is a stressful and painful experience especially when you have a family to feed so I really doubt that the vast majority of this people are just enjoying themselves with the few bucks that they receive from the government.
 
So if we decide to cut food stamps and unemployment benefits, what should we say to the people that can't find a job? a) Die  or b) Steal ? Is there a 3rd option? Probably a few will pick a) die but I suspect most of them will pick b). Moral aside, I personally prefer to pay with my taxes food stamps and unemployment benefits than having civil unrest and no security in the streets.
 

 

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Re: What's Wrong With The Bees?

I think this bee problem has been going on for sometime. Recently there was a report on some findings.

Scientists find clue in mystery of the vanishing bees

http://articles.cnn.com/2007-09-06/tech/bee.disorder_1_colony-collapse-disorder-australian-bees-worker-bees?_s=PM:TECH

 

A virus found in healthy Australian honey bees may be playing a role in the collapse of honey bee colonies across the United States, researchers reported Thursday.

Signs of colony collapse disorder were first reported in the United States in 2004, the same year American beekeepers started importing bees from Australia.

The disorder is marked by hives left with a queen, a few newly hatched adults and plenty of food, but the worker bees responsible for pollination gone.

The virus identified in the healthy Australian bees is Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV) -- named that because it was discovered by Hebrew University researchers.

Although worker bees in colony collapse disorder vanish, bees infected with IAPV die close to the hive, after developing shivering wings and paralysis. For some reason, the Australian bees seem to be resistant to IAPV and do not come down with symptoms.

Scientists used genetic analyses of bees collected over the past three years and found that IAPV was present in bees that had come from colony collapse disorder hives 96 percent of the time.

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Thank you  Vanityfox. I had never seen that video before but it was worth watching.

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About those bees

I have a friend that has a few beehives -- keeps them on his property for the honey and the pollination factor.  These are not "working" bees, i.e., trucked from site to site following the pollination seasons of various cash crops all over the continent.

His bees are fine.

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

I only saw one honeybee all summer.  I pollinated my squash and cucumbers myself.

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

TED talk: Hans Rosling's new insights on poverty
http://www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_reveals_new_insights_on_poverty.html

..with all the things we take for granted, it is interesting what live needs to flourish.

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Re: Why the current depression doesn't look like the the ...
SailAway wrote:

Is there a 3rd option?

Yes, let the market and demand determine what jobs are available and at what pay.  If there is a glut of people and too few jobs then all wages should drop and wages set to the point where people become employed.  Unemployment, minimum wage, regulations and incentives that distort what is desired and where, fiat currency that distorts demand, etc.  All these things play a part.  The problem is we have let the governments of the world convince us that they can control the economy when all they can do is distort it for a while.  We are witnessing the result of central planning.

Even if we decide to provide food stamps, unemployment, other benefits for a while it's all going to come to an end because you can't create employment or wealth with a printing press.  So we either start letting things correct or we continue to make them worse....

 

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Camels, ostriches to fill Sri Lanka food gaps
By Sajithra Nithi for Radio Australia

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/01/05/3106970.htm?section=justin

A new initiative in Sri Lanka could see the introduction of camels and ostriches to the country in a bid to curb food shortages.

Although more than two decades of civil war ended last year, people in some areas of Sri Lanka are still finding the cost of food painfully high, and thousands of children suffer malnutrition.

The deputy minister for livestock development, HR Mithrapala, says Sri Lanka is interested in possibly importing camels from Saudi Arabia to supply milk for locals and tourists.

He says the nation may also import ostriches to increase egg supplies.

Mr Mithrapala told Radio Australia's Connect Asia program the plan is mainly about diversifying the diet of Sri Lankans.

"There is no food scarcity - we have enough food. What we want to do now is try varieties, different types of things we've seen in the world," he said.

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satellite pics of Queensland floods

The flooded area is now bigger than France and Germany combined......

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...
gregroberts wrote:

"Something's killing bats too, and ash trees and chestnut trees and beech trees and maples and amphibians and songbirds and numerous sea creatures..." 

Must be caused by humans, those dinosaurs sure were lucky that humans were not there when they were or the humans would have killed them too.

"We're creating an uglier world than we inherited."

Speak for yourself, Doug

Would you like to share what you think is responsible for our current wave of extinctions?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/08/040816001443.htm

Quote:

At present, according to numerous specialists' opinion, the sixth - pleistocene - wave of extinction is coming, which has been in many respects provoked by men. Given the current average extinction rate of 40 species a day, it would take only 16 thousand years for the extinction of 96 percent of the contemporary biota - exactly as much as died out during the period of disastrous Permian extinction. The major reason for the oncoming calamity is destruction of plants' and animal's ecotope. Scientists have estimated that the species life span for contemporary mammals and birds has decreased up to 10 thousand years, i.e. it became 100 to 1000 times shorter than that of fossil forms. If the habitat continues to be destroyed at the same pace, the life span of these species will soon make only 200-400 years. There are no such estimates for the invertebrates, but they are undoubtedly affected both by the global environment and climate change, and by disappearance of local biotopes.

Doug

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The World According to Monsanto

Sundown, rjs,

I live in hope that whatever you have planned right this moment can be dropped, and that you can sit down, click the play button at the corner of the video below, and watch without distraction ...

The World According to Monsanto

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7812548160862207272#

~ VF ~

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

The Permian–Triassic (P–Tr) extinction event, informally known as the Great Dying,[1] was an extinction event that occurred 251.4 million years ago,[2][3] forming the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geologic periods. It was the Earth's most severe extinction event, with up to 96% of all marine species[4] and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species becoming extinct[5] It is the only known mass extinction of insects.[6][7] Some 57% of all families and 83% of all genera were killed. Because so much biodiversity was lost, the recovery of life on Earth took significantly longer than after other extinction events.[4] This event has been described as the "mother of all mass extinctions".[8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permian%E2%80%93Triassic_extinction_event

Hmmm, no humans here either, has it occured to you that it might not be human related? Nature is not very kind to life, humans being part of nature are no exception. The Sun a natural part of the universe will render the Earth into a charcoal briquet when it runs out of fuel and that will end all worries of mankind destoying the planet. BTW, since humans have not harnessed fusion yet, how do we know the Sun will be fine for billions of years, sounds like wishful thinking to me.

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Re: Monsanto Film

VanityFox,

Thank you for posting this documentary, excellent quality.  Unbelievably disturbing.  With the reports of birds, bees, fish dying and the Monsanto tentacles all over the world, its depressing beyond words.

What to do?  Watch what one buys, grows? Support the activists? Pay attention and do what one can locally?

YH

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Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Greg

Quote:

Hmmm, no humans here either, has it occured to you that it might not be human related?

Given that there are 7B of us on the planet consuming way beyond the earth's capacity to sustain, has it occurred to you that it might be, and probably is, human related?

Doug

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Re: Monsanto Film
hardingcrew wrote:

VanityFox,

Thank you for posting this documentary, excellent quality.  Unbelievably disturbing.  With the reports of birds, bees, fish dying and the Monsanto tentacles all over the world, its depressing beyond words.

What to do?  Watch what one buys, grows? Support the activists? Pay attention and do what one can locally?

YH

Hardingcrew,

I transcribed this statement from Andrew Kimbrell into a paragraph from the film The Future of Food. What I'd like you to do is read this paragraph a couple of times out loud so as to help the words to sink in. Try and say them out loud as though you really mean them, to get the true essence of them, if you would : -

 

“What of the near eight-hundred million in a state of starvation in the globe every day. The reason why about that many people starve every day – and that is a tragic fact – has nothing to do with the amount of food available. Most of these people around the world that are starving used to be farmers. But because of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund giving huge loans to these countries, they could no-longer allow for subsistence farming. They had to grow expensive export crops back to the first world to pay back their loans. So they kicked all these hundreds of millions of farmers off their farms. They ended up in the Bhopals and the Mexico City's and the Brasilias of the world without money. They no-longer are growing their own food, and they're competing for the scarce jobs available in the new industrialisation of these countries. They are no-longer food-independent. They are food-dependent.”

Here's Richard Kimbrell at a lecture in 2009: -

The Future of Food documentary, incidentally, was made in 2004, and now that figure of eight hundred million is now much closer to one billion; that's one thousand million people ...

One of the major factors taking place is that less than 4% of the planet - three hundred and eleven million at this time - and less than one third of those suffering globally - are living in the United States, fully benefiting from the destruction of diversity and food independents in those countries whose debt to first world countries - through 'loans' to less than one tenth of a percentile of their populations - are given the task and the obligation to pay those debts back via poverty, living in slums, and earning less than a $1 a day in subsistence from western industrial export corporations.

Meantime, the diversity and independence of Americans are being driven into poverty through debt. As the middle class shrinks, the working class blooms, as industry is sent abroad by multinationals.

Meantime, Joe Public can't afford, or shortly, won't afford healthy local food, and will have to settle with yet more poor quality foods from big box stores such as Walmart, who have, it seems in their own small part (!), successfully smashed main street America, causing the dollars that would have ordinarily been traded in small established towns among the towns folk, into trading imported food that travels as much as 3,000 miles from origin, with dollars that will therefore never be invested back into the local community.

You can, looking back, and by degrees, see the raised advancement in export of industry in the United States forward of 1980, along with the whittling away of high wages, as the cost of living rose higher than earnings year on year from about this time, and see the near capping of the minimum wage since the end of the 1990's.

What can you do???

You can try fighting these multinational corporations through congress, but it does seem as though they have congress in their back-pockets.

You can march the streets with banners, but the law enactments placed on such public outbursts over this past decade - and incidentally against Amendment Rights - will more likely have you arrested, since the law enforcement agencies are also now in the back-pockets of corporations.

Alternatively, you could leave your country of origin and try your luck elsewhere, and wait out until such measures already in place in the States catch you up over time.

There is one measure that could work however. A small, quiet, private, local community, silently under the radar, producing their own food to trade with others without taxation and without others common knowledge. It aint perfect, but it would markedly improve your health if you established this agreement with your neighbours today, or communicated and moved to a community that will accept you tomorrow, while you still have time against the pressure of political or geological peak oil, and the economic collapse by degree that is happening in slow motion right about your ears as you read this.

You can get involved and fight in no small way as I am doing writing to you, while at the same time growing your own food in a small community of like-minded individuals. You could even do it in a suburb just like this wonderful family : -

I also recommend anyone reading this post to roll up their sleeves and head on into this home-grown thread that'll do you no harm at all: -

The Definitive Agriculture/Permacultur Thread

~ VF ~

dickey45's picture
dickey45
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 12 2008
Posts: 77
Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

I got some Bird's Eye frozen stir fry vegetables from the store the other day.  Now remember, I live in Oregon.  I used to work in the canneries.  The stir fry came from China.  I don't know why it bothered me so much but I can't seem to get over it.

hardingcrew's picture
hardingcrew
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 18 2010
Posts: 13
Re: Daily Digest 1/4 - Alarming Decline in Bees, Fed May ...

Thank you VanityFox for your time spent in sending all of the great information and clips.  I have begun some permaculture projects this fall and will continue more in the spring.  Education and knowledge is what we can do!!

(Also sent you a PM)

YH

Vanityfox451's picture
Vanityfox451
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 28 2008
Posts: 1636
Weitz & Luxenberg Sues Birds Eye Foods Over Alleged Pollutant
dickey45 wrote:

I got some Bird's Eye frozen stir fry vegetables from the store the other day.  Now remember, I live in Oregon.  I used to work in the canneries.  The stir fry came from China.  I don't know why it bothered me so much but I can't seem to get over it.

Dickey,

Try this...

Read the back of the frozen stir fry vegetable bag, copy down the ingredients, and shop for every one of them organically. I can guarantee the flavour will be so good, you'd wonder why in hell you hadn't done this sooner!

Behind every corporate slogan and jingle add that shows smiling children around a dinner table with digital creature's to draw the eye, there's the reality, with all but two or three clicks of a mouse on Google : -

Link to Original Article

NEW YORK - Weitz & Luxenberg P.C. on May 17 filed a lawsuit on behalf of more than 70 Fennville, Mich., residents who allege that their properties have been contaminated and their health has been harmed by chemical pollutants that have entered the environment as a result of the Birds Eye food processing facility in their neighborhood (Michael Barnes, et al. v. Birds Eye Foods LLC, No. 10-46699-NO, Mich. Cir., Allegan Co.).

 "For decades, Fennville residents have been contending with well water that has been tainted with dangerous chemicals," said Robin Greenwald, the head of the Weitz & Luxenberg Environmental and Toxic Torts litigation unit.

The seven-count complaint alleges that for decades, the Birds Eye facility at 100 Sherman St. has sprayed wastewater containing chemical pollutants onto fields in the area. This spraying operation ultimately led to hundreds of millions of gallons of wastewater being absorbed into the region's groundwater, it contends. That wastewater triggered a chemical reaction in the soil, causing unsafe levels of manganese, arsenic and iron to leach into the groundwater that feeds Fennville residents' wells, the suit alleges.

According to the lawsuit:

Birds Eye failed to take appropriate and timely action to test the region for groundwater contamination, only beginning to do so after receiving a 2005 order from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Despite the investigation, Birds Eye continues to spray wastewater into open fields at the Fennville facility, which drains into the ground and continues to contaminate the area's well water.

As a result of the groundwater contamination plume, those living in homes that relied on well water have faced property damage, reduction in the value of their homes, property values, the loss of use and enjoyment of their property, damage to pipes and plumbing fixtures and damage to water treatment and other home appliances that were used with the tainted well water.

In addition, the plaintiffs risk serious health problems linked to the unsafe levels of iron, arsenic and manganese. Exposure to manganese in water can cause damage to the nervous system; exposure to high levels of iron can cause damage to internal organs such as the liver and pancreas. Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and exposure to lower levels can cause nausea, decreased production of red and white blood cells, abnormal heart rhythm and damage to blood vessels.

Weitz & Luxenberg, founded in 1986, is one of the leading plaintiffs' litigation law firms in America.

Download the complaint here.

~ VF ~

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