Daily Digest

Daily Digest 10/27 - SD Schools Consider Closures, Stockton: We Must 'Cut To The Bone', Debt Clock Passes $48k per citizen

Thursday, October 27, 2011, 10:49 AM
  • Tax haven crackdown yields 14 billion euros: OECD
  • Berlusconi on the brink over emergency growth plan
  • Fitch Executive Says No Quick Fix For Europe
  • San Diego Unified School District considers closures
  • Fresno cancels annual Christmas parade
  • Worst school cuts 'since the '50s' (UK)
  • Heist from San Francisco church raises alarm bells
  • Europe must do debt deal quickly: U.S. Treasury
  • Greenspan: Why European Union Is Doomed to Fail
  • 'We have cut to the bone' (Stockton)
  • USDA Expects Food Prices to Climb as Much as 4.5%
  • China labour costs soar as wages rise 22%
  • Recession doubles area's food stamp recipients
  • Female veterans fall into ranks of homeless
  • QE3 among Fed's remaining bullets, Dudley says
  • Prince George's speed cameras issue 13,173 tickets in first month
  • National Debt Clock passes $48,000 per citizen

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Economy

Tax haven crackdown yields 14 billion euros: OECD

An international drive against offshore tax havens has reaped nearly 14 billion euros from would-be tax evaders, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said on Tuesday. Some 100,000 taxpayers in 20 major economies surveyed by the OECD have revealed previously undetected offshore assets in the last two years, allowing tax authorities to collect the equivalent of nearly $19 billion. "As cash-strapped governments look to pay down their deficits, this will make a substantial contribution to fiscal consolidation," OECD Secretary General Angel Gurria said at the opening of a two-day meeting on tax transparency.

Berlusconi on the brink over emergency growth plan

Pressure built on Italy's embattled Premier Silvio Berlusconi as he struggled Tuesday to muster support for an emergency growth plan, which the EU wants within hours and which could cost the tenacious leader his job. Berlusconi has survived scandals, court cases and dozens of confidence votes, but experts say this economic plan will be one of the most critical tests yet of his grasp on the country's leadership.

Fitch Executive Says No Quick Fix For Europe

"There is no quick fix, no matter what comes from the summit on Wednesday," said Tony Stringer, Fitch's global head of sovereign ratings, by teleconference. .....Fitch's Stringer said he regarded Greece as insolvent and that a default for that country is inevitable, with the outlook for Spain and Italy a concern. Fitch noted that banks in those regions had a combined exposure of about EUR360 billion to the sovereign debt problems of Europe, with the market already pricing in a "significant" downgrade of Italian and Spanish debt.

San Diego Unified School District considers closures

San Diego Unified trustees were scheduled to hear a report Tuesday that proposes more than a dozen schools be closed, relocated or consolidated next year.....District officials have said they are facing a deficit of up to $118 million in next year's $1.057 billion operating budget. The district stands to save $500,000 per campus under the recommendation released Thursday, the newspaper reported.

Fresno cancels annual Christmas parade

A holiday tradition is changing in downtown Fresno: budget cuts are forcing the city to cancel its annual Christmas parade. City officials tell Action News the traditional parade costs a minimum of $15 thousand. The city has only $5 thousand for the event this year, before community sponsorships are added in. Instead of a parade, officials say the city will host a tree lighting ceremony and holiday festival in downtown Fresno.

Worst school cuts 'since the '50s' (UK)

Schools in Britain will endure the biggest cuts to education seen since the 1950s, tax and spending experts have warned. The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) estimates that schools will face a funding shortfall of 14.4% which will hit school and college building projects the hardest. Researchers at the IFS estimate that the cuts will hit higher education, as funding to universities has been cut by 40%, but some of that shortfall will be recouped with increased tuition fees.

Heist from San Francisco church raises alarm bells

A 5,300-pound bell that survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and is worth an estimated $75,000 was stolen last weekend by recycling thieves probably hoping to scrap it for about $10,000.The theft of this historic bell from St. Mary’s Cathedral is just the latest in a rash of alarming metal thefts across The City. The Police Department recently launched a special investigations unit specifically to combat such thefts.

Europe must do debt deal quickly: U.S. Treasury

But experts on both sides of the Atlantic are worried that the leaked details of the agreement fall short of solving the crisis. For instance, there have been reports that the plan calls for European banks to raise reserves by 100 billion euros. Analysts said this will not be enough to calm investor fears over the health of the European financial sector. Europe plan may fall short, U.S. experts worry. The Financial Times also reported that negotiators have asked bondholders to take 60% haircuts on the face value of Greek bond holdings. But experts said it remains to be seen whether Greece’s creditors will accept such a large write-down.

Greenspan: Why European Union Is Doomed to Fail

He also expects the European crisis, coupled with a failure to address the U.S. budget deficit, may be severe enough to cause a bond market crisis if the market suddenly decides the U.S. is more like Greece than not. "It is very difficult to predict when a bond crisis could happen," he said. But getting an agreement on the U.S. budget will be difficult, he added, because Washington is the most polarized he's seen it in his career.

'We have cut to the bone' (Stockton)

The city earlier this month disclosed in a report to its bond holders that it may soon fall short by $858,000 to pay its debt on two 2006 bonds used to redevelop Stockton neighborhoods. This disclosure came as Standard & Poor's, which assigns credit ratings, downgraded the bonds to the lowest investment grade and gave the bonds a "negative outlook."

USDA Expects Food Prices to Climb as Much as 4.5% .

The U.S. government said food prices are expected to climb 3.5%-4.5% in 2011, an increase of one-half of a percentage point from its prior forecast, as higher commodity costs continue to filter down to consumers.

China labour costs soar as wages rise 22%

As of the end of September, local authorities in 21 of China’s 31 provincial-level regions had increased minimum wages by an average 21.7 per cent, the ministry of human resources and social security said. Several more have also promised to raise minimum wages before the end of the year.

Recession doubles area's food stamp recipients (Sarasota County)

Grim statistics show the human side of the recession in Sarasota County, including a doubling in the county households receiving food stamps and a 41 percent spike in Medicaid recipients. "There are so many issues that it's overwhelming to even those of us who deal with it every day," said Benny Weaver, vice chairman of the Community Alliance of Sarasota County, an umbrella group of nonprofits, local governments, and social service agencies.

Female veterans fall into ranks of homeless

Women make up a growing number of homeless veterans, a group usually associated with combat-hardened men unable to cope with civilian life. Homelessness among female veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars has increased every year for the last six years - from 150 in 2006 to 1,700 this year - according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

QE3 among Fed's remaining bullets, Dudley says

Another round of quantitative easing is a possible option for the central bank as it attempts to boost the slow U.S. economic recovery, one of the most influential Fed officials said on Monday. "I don't think the Fed has run out of bullets," said New York Federal Reserve President William Dudley, listing the large-scale asset purchases, known as quantitative easing, as one of a few moves the Fed could make. "It's possible that we could do another round of quantitative easing, we could do quantitative easing round three," he told the Bronx Chamber of Commerce.

Prince George's speed cameras issue 13,173 tickets in first month

Prince George's County has issued more than $500,000 in speeding tickets in the first month of its new speed camera program. Officials have mailed 13,173 citations worth $40 each to motorists from its 14 cameras since the program started on Sept. 20, or more than $527,000 in fines, according to a police spokesman..... However, D.C. cameras ticket drivers for traveling as little as 1 mph over the limit -- in Maryland, drivers can be ticketed only when caught traveling 12 mph over more over the limit.

National Debt Clock passes $48,000 per citizen

The estimated population of the United States is 311,551,880 so each citizen's share of this debt is $48,000.77.

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23 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Matt Taibbi: Wall Street Isn't Winning, It's Cheating

Once again, it takes an entertainment magazine like Rolling Stone and an investigative journalist like Matt Taibbi to point out what the regular news agencies, networks, and talking heads turn a blind eye to...

OWS's Beef: Wall Street Isn't Winning It's Cheating
"All weekend I was thinking about this “jealousy” question, and I just kept coming back to all the different ways the game is rigged. People aren't jealous and they don’t want privileges. They just want a level playing field, and they want Wall Street to give up its cheat codes, things like: FREE MONEY. Ordinary people have to borrow their money at market rates. Lloyd Blankfein and Jamie Dimon get billions of dollars for free, from the Federal Reserve. They borrow at zero and lend the same money back to the government at two or three percent, a valuable public service otherwise known as 'standing in the middle and taking a gigantic cut when the government decides to lend money to itself.'"
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/owss-beef-wall-street-isnt-winning-its-cheating-20111025

The rest of the article really hits home. You'll want to read this and pass it along to your friends and family.

Poet

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Concentrate on the root of the problem....

Matt Taibbi does such a great job of stating the root of the problem, The Fed, but then gets off on tangents about Credit Amnesty, Ungraduated taxes, ... Concentrating on the root and getting rid of the Fed (and IMF) and implementing sound money goes along way to solving all the other problems.

 

 

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Corporations Capturing Government

Rhare

I think the root is not just the Fed. It's investment banks/corporations that have captured regulation and make government (and the Fed) spend on their priorities and benefits at the disastrous expense of the people. There are different rules for them and they cheat.

Poet

rhare wrote:

Matt Taibbi does such a great job of stating the root of the problem, The Fed, but then gets off on tangents about Credit Amnesty, Ungraduated taxes, ... Concentrating on the root and getting rid of the Fed (and IMF) and implementing sound money goes along way to solving all the other problems.

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7 Billionth Person

"The arrival of the 7 billionth person is cause for profound global concern. It carries a challenge: What will it take to maintain a planet in which each person has a chance for a full, productive and prosperous life, and in which the planet's resources are sustained for future generations?

"How, in short, can we enjoy 'sustainable development' on a very crowded planet?"

 

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/26/the-buzz-behind-7-billion-people-a-milestone-and-a-warning/?hpt=hp_c1

I literally smacked my forehead out of frusteration.
How can we enjoy sustained development?
There is no response to this question that doesn't involve foul language, so I'l let the readers decide what to make of this nonsense... Personally, I'm terrified of the proposition of adding "billions of new people this century".
As quantity increases, quality decreases. I don't mean this as a statement of character, but rather the amount of social energy that's available to be invested in people...

Other opinions were presented though:

And Roger Martin's article in the UK's Guardian newspaper says the growing population could cost us the planet we live on in the way we now know it.

"Every additional person needs food, water and energy, and produces more waste and pollution, so ratchets up our total impact on the planet, and ratchets down everyone else's share – the rich far more than the poor. By definition, total impact and consumption are worked out by measuring the average per person multiplied by the number of people. Thus all environmental (and many economic and social) problems are easier to solve with fewer people, and ultimately impossible with ever more."

"On a finite planet, the optimum population providing the best quality of life for all, is clearly much smaller than the maximum, permitting bare survival. The more we are, the less for each; fewer people mean better lives.

Nothing alarms me quite like the population.
I can't help but think "If not for this, every other problem would be less severe".
Interested in hearing others' views.

Cheers,

Aaron

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population overshoot

Aaron,  there is no way to sugarcoat population overshoot.  if your stomach aches when you think about the reprecussions then you are close to "getting it"  beyond that, not many are willing to talk about it.  basicially it boils down to a massive die-off.  famine, diease, war...  we need to shed some 4-5 billion over the next decade...  a plan will increase your odds of survival...  near term, survival might not seem like the best option but it is....

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Alpha Mike wrote: "The
Alpha Mike wrote:

"The arrival of the 7 billionth person is cause for profound global concern. It carries a challenge: What will it take to maintain a planet in which each person has a chance for a full, productive and prosperous life, and in which the planet's resources are sustained for future generations?

"How, in short, can we enjoy 'sustainable development' on a very crowded planet?"

 

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/26/the-buzz-behind-7-billion-people-a-milestone-and-a-warning/?hpt=hp_c1

I literally smacked my forehead out of frusteration.
How can we enjoy sustained development?
There is no response to this question that doesn't involve foul language, so I'l let the readers decide what to make of this nonsense... Personally, I'm terrified of the proposition of adding "billions of new people this century".
As quantity increases, quality decreases. I don't mean this as a statement of character, but rather the amount of social energy that's available to be invested in people...

Other opinions were presented though:

And Roger Martin's article in the UK's Guardian newspaper says the growing population could cost us the planet we live on in the way we now know it.

"Every additional person needs food, water and energy, and produces more waste and pollution, so ratchets up our total impact on the planet, and ratchets down everyone else's share – the rich far more than the poor. By definition, total impact and consumption are worked out by measuring the average per person multiplied by the number of people. Thus all environmental (and many economic and social) problems are easier to solve with fewer people, and ultimately impossible with ever more."

"On a finite planet, the optimum population providing the best quality of life for all, is clearly much smaller than the maximum, permitting bare survival. The more we are, the less for each; fewer people mean better lives.

Nothing alarms me quite like the population.
I can't help but think "If not for this, every other problem would be less severe".
Interested in hearing others' views.

Cheers,

Aaron

 

Aaron, you may be interested in this:

http://www.growthbusters.org/

Best wishes ... dons

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Maybe not all the problem, but let's strike at the root first.
Poet wrote:

It's investment banks/corporations that have captured regulation and make government (and the Fed) spend on their priorities and benefits at the disastrous expense of the people. There are different rules for them and they cheat.

But they have the ability to do so because they have access to essentially free money.  With sound currency you cut back on favors the government can dole out and corporations have to be a lot better behaved because they are much more dependent upon their consumers and shareholders.  While it may not solve everything, we should certainly strive for fixing the root problem first, then decide what intervention is necessary after we correct the distortion field of the Fed.   Otherwise, all we do is throw band-aids at a problem that often have unintended and opposite consequences from what is desired.

Also, Matt Talbi says Wall Street isn't winning, it's cheating.  But for the most part they aren't cheating, they are simply playing by the rules they get to make up.  We the people, choose safety and less responsibility over our lives and outcomes (Fed, FDIC, SEC, ...) but handed our decision making power over to the bankers and government.  We allowed them to take control, make rules that benefited them, and we wonder why we see problems now?

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It's Not Just The Fed Or The Lack Of Sound Money

Rhare:

That's nice and all, but honestly, beating on only the government (or only the Fed, or only the people) blame drum(s) gets kinda old.

You wrote. "But for the most part they aren't cheating, they are simply playing by the rules they get to make up."

Look, there's two kinds of people in this world. One kind has no problem with that sentence. The other kind thinks that's a MAJOR festering problem that "sound currency" or "ending the Fed" won't resolve.

Here's another one by Matt Taibbi, about politics and government and corporations and money in an arena, Texas, that has to act like it has sound currency because it can't print its own (which proves the point that it's not just sound currency that we need):
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/rick-perry-the-best-little-who...

Poet

rhare wrote:
Poet wrote:

It's investment banks/corporations that have captured regulation and make government (and the Fed) spend on their priorities and benefits at the disastrous expense of the people. There are different rules for them and they cheat.

But they have the ability to do so because they have access to essentially free money.  With sound currency you cut back on favors the government can dole out and corporations have to be a lot better behaved because they are much more dependent upon their consumers and shareholders.  While it may not solve everything, we should certainly strive for fixing the root problem first, then decide what intervention is necessary after we correct the distortion field of the Fed.   Otherwise, all we do is throw band-aids at a problem that often have unintended and opposite consequences from what is desired.

Also, Matt Talbi says Wall Street isn't winning, it's cheating.  But for the most part they aren't cheating, they are simply playing by the rules they get to make up.  We the people, choose safety and less responsibility over our lives and outcomes (Fed, FDIC, SEC, ...) but handed our decision making power over to the bankers and government.  We allowed them to take control, make rules that benefited them, and we wonder why we see problems now?

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7 billionth person

 Hi Alpha Mike,

I corresponded briefly with Prof Bartlett, as featured in the CC.  Whilst Prof Bartlett and many others are very concerned with population, others I have met, including Bill Mollison, are less worried. 

Bill Mollison is like, [from memory here] 'How are you going to stop people having babies?'.  Bill [the co-founder of Permaculture] is one of the brightest people I have met and he is adament that the environment, properly managed, can sustain many more mouths.  We cant sustain the mouths we already have with our present unsustainable food growing and distribution systems, but with Permaculture and some massive social shifts we can feed them all.  We know that with the present production systems and some true equality we could feed everyone easily with our present unsustainable systems, with slow local food we can feed billions more according to Bill Mollison.  Having done a Permaculture design course with Bill I agree with him whole-heatedly.

Bills biggest concerns right now are topsoil loss and species loss... at least that is what he told me in 2008-09.

So, no, not everyone that sees the problems facing the world sees population as a huge part of the problem.  If we continue with our old systems, then population growth is a huge monster... however some believe that if we move to local sustainable food systems we can manage many more mouths.

Stewart,

Brisbane.

ps. Bill is very aware of global warming and he says, with great credibility, that it can be reversed... 'Give me the Australian coastline up to the first ridgeline, and I will bring back the rain', says Bill. 

 

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Polluted America

Polluted America: Amazingly colourful aerial pictures that highlight damage to Earth wrought by industry

At first glance they're beautiful, but these incredible snaps reveal something far more ugly.

J Henry Fair's spectacular aerial images show the devastation man has wreaked on America.

Pollution is exposed on a massive scale, creating striking vivid colours that highlight the scars of spillages, open cast mining, chemical and oil leaks, industrial decay and deforestation.

 

Loads of fine photos at URL

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Corruption/Malinvestment correlates to the proximity to the Fed.
Poet wrote:

That's nice and all, but honestly, beating on only the government (or only the Fed, or only the people) blame drum(s) gets kinda old.

So does the constant drum or the progressive that all we need is a little more government involvement, that if we just had the right people in power, or just had control of some other aspect of our lives that things would be better.  

Poet wrote:

Look, there's two kinds of people in this world. One kind has no problem with that sentence. The other kind thinks that's a MAJOR festering problem that "sound currency" or "ending the Fed" won't resolve.

I would say it's more like, there are two kinds of people, those that understand the corrupting effects on everything when you incorrectly value resources by manipulating the measuring stick and those that don't.

Poet wrote:

Here's another one by Matt Taibbi, about politics and government and corporations and money in an arena, Texas, that has to act like it has sound currency because it can't print its own (which proves the point that it's not just sound currency that we need):
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/new...

Was that really the article you intended?  If so that assumption is quite the stretch.  I get nothing from that article that remotely speaks to sound money, rather the complete opposite that shows how incredible corrupt an individual can be when not inhibited by the restraint on behavior that sound money creates.   Sound money limits bad behavior because the costs of doing something foolish become apparent much more quickly that what we see from the largely disconnected effects of inflation.  Making poor choices results in losses that are directly felt by those that have a vested interest.  That then leads to much more carefull investment/spending in the future.

The Fed through it's manipulation of money has essentially removed the responsibility for prudent behavior in dirrect correspondence to those with the most access.  Banks/Financial institutions have the most distortion, then government, then US citizens, and finally citizens of the world.  The closer you are to the Fed, the more outlandish your actions can be without facing the consequences (at least not immediately). Ultimately all the excesses allowed by the Fed will be repaid.

I also think that article was the worst Matt Talbi articles I have read.  I don't disagree that Perry is a seriously corrupt individual, but that article was just as much a conservative bash fest as it was about Perry.

 

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OWS seems dangerously misdirected

I agree rhare. Taibbi does a good job highlighting fraud in both the banking and political spheres. However it is frustrating that he cannot take his analysis beyond what are the symptoms to reach the core of the problem which is a fraudulent monetary system. The US politicians voted for by a majority are happy to hand monopoly rights and fraudulent banking entitlements such as the requirement to hold only fractional reserves with implicit bailout guarantees to the banksters. Of course this allows governments to expand entitlement and warfare programs way beyond the productive capacity of an economy to support. Along the way the government sector grows and the more productive private sector on which they depend for funding shrinks. In a vicious circle this leads to governments becoming more reliant on the banking system to raise funds.

The OWS protesters seem to think that capitalism is the problem and that bigger government is needed to bring it to heel. What they fail to realise is that the government and the banks are incentivised to bastardise the capitalist system. If they get their wish and the government continues to be backstopped by the banks so that deficits and sovereign debt grow ever larger, they along with everyone will learn a harsh lesson about the importance of private property and limited government powers to a prosperous and free society. In particular, an inelastic commodity based money system stripped away from the control of the government appears to be an essential component of such a society.

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Crazy Horse

" In particular, an inelastic commodity based money system stripped away from the control of the government appears to be an essential component of such a society."

Benjamin Graham (Warran Buffet's mentor) proposed just such a system in his book "Storage and Stability" in the latter half of the 1930's.  His proposal built in elasticity in a way that addressed the weaknesses of the gold standard but retained most, if not all, of the discipline. The country was already well down the track of Keynesian economic policy and wasn't interested in examining an alternative that took control of the money supply away from the Treasury and the bankers.   It would be an interesting exercise to imagine how such a commodity based monetary system could emerge from the current situation.

 

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Whoa...J Henry
Damnthematrix wrote:

J Henry Fair's spectacular aerial images show the devastation man has wreaked on America.

 

Loads of fine photos at URL

It's a small world. J-Henry is a friend of mine. In addition to his photographic work, he funds a wolf conservation/education center in North Salem, NY (Westchester county). I used to take first dates there. Fine way to cull the women who weren't a fit... Viva -- Sager

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I might have seen his work elsewhere...
SagerXX wrote:

It's a small world. J-Henry is a friend of mine.

Do you know if his photos were at an exhibit on SuperFund cleanup sites at the National Academy of Sciences building in DC about 5-6 years ago?  I remember looking at very similar pictures of the devastation from the copper mines in the west.  It was quite amusing that my very next visit was to the Corcoran Gallery of Art, where the docent went on and on about how lucky they were to have all the art from William A. Clark, copper king.  I remember thinking the art didn't seem like a good trade off.

 

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Sager, since you know the photographer.....

 

............maybe you could have him clear something up.

After viewing the photos I read some of the comments and this one piqued my interest:

What exactly is it you think you see?

Allow me to focus on the Texas site. It is a FACT that Texas only has one natural lake in the entire state, and it's about 300 miles away from Luling, So the "polluted body of water" in Luling is a purpose built facility. Now, if you look up Luling on Google Maps you'll notice that on the far east side of town at the end of Willow Avenue, there are 7 square shaped ponds. If you scroll in closer you'll see in very high detail that it is a water treatment plant, and lo and behold, there is your bright green water right there at the water treatment plant. So you have a picture of water being treated and purified. Is that your idea of "damage"?

So, I did the same Google Earth search on some of the other photos.

The first picture in the series, the "red Lake " at Darrow Louisiana does not exist. No lake exists there. Or a river, except that Darrow is located on the banks of the Mississippi River. Clearly, this picture wasn't taken at Darrow or it's environs.
 

Likewise the photo of the:  'Red mud': The shocking red colour marks where the earth has been scarred by Bauxite waste from aluminium production, which contains significant amounts of heavy metal contamination. Pictured at Darrow, Louisiana,    does not exist there, either. Darrow is located in a bend of the Mississippi River and is a tiny town surrounded by farmland.  The geography just doesn't match.

Also, the picture at Geismar Louisiana looks like it could be a close up photo of a very small, purpose built containment pond at an industrial facility located there; hardly the environmental ruin indicated. The surrounding countryside looks very pastoral.
 

The coal plant at New Road Louisiana is also located in a verdant countryside and it would appear any pollution is contained in ponds or other containment areas constructed for that purpose.

I couldn't see anything resembling the pollution attributed to the Fort Mcmurray, Canada site, although the area is far more vast and difficult to view.

It's got me wondering just what we're looking at in these pictures.

 

 

 

 

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Great Post! Great Article!

 This one's going in the file.

Rector

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No solution

The tough thing about population growth is that IMO it is not a solvable problem.  Growth of the population is built into our genes, our biology, our cultures, and our personal dreams.  Which young couple is going to voluntarily be childless?  Which desperately poor person anywhere is going to willingly stay that way or limit their quality of life for an abstraction?  

I'm not saying there is no room for life style changes, but the Nasty Nash equilibrium has got us by the balls here.  No way out.  Its almost as if the end of humanity was baked into the plan from the beginning. . .

Rector 

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J-Hen

Well, Henry has been taking these sorts of photos for longer than I've known him (since '97). Some of the photos may not be current, so the photos in question may have been of events rather than states. I do know he was down on the Gulf after the Macondo blowout. Obviously any spill photos he has would show scenes that no longer exist. But you can ask him yourself. His contact info is on his website. Viva -- Sager

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Re: No solution
Rector wrote:

I'm not saying there is no room for life style changes, but the Nasty Nash equilibrium has got us by the balls here.  No way out.  Its almost as if the end of humanity was baked into the plan from the beginning. . .

This is in perfect agreement with science (the second law of thermodynamics)... In a few trillion years all stars will collapse, galaxies will dissipate, leaving us a mild pea soup to nagivate in :)

Samuel

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Stewart, You

Stewart,
You said:

Quote:

So, no, not everyone that sees the problems facing the world sees population as a huge part of the problem.  If we continue with our old systems, then population growth is a huge monster... however some believe that if we move to local sustainable food systems we can manage many more mouths.

It's interesting you say that... I think that's really the only way to go.
Such a lifestyle would likely keep things growing 'proportionally" as well, rather than the asymmetrical growth we see with the big-agriculture and distribution system we have now, which allow cities to be entirely detached from their food sources and such.


Quote:

We cant sustain the mouths we already have with our present unsustainable food growing and distribution systems, but with Permaculture and some massive social shifts we can feed them all.  We know that with the present production systems and some true equality we could feed everyone easily with our present unsustainable systems, with slow local food we can feed billions more according to Bill Mollison.  Having done a Permaculture design course with Bill I agree with him whole-heatedly.

I'd really love to see this. Very interesting, and if you don't mind, please share more.

Found this interesting as well...

What's next? The global population will continue to increase during your lifetime and beyond, reaching 10 billion by 2083. However, the rate of growth is expected to slow. Little of the current growth is happening in developed countries like yours.

Longer lives: Working-age people like you will be supporting increasing numbers of older people during the next decades. By 2050, there will be just 2.2 people of working age supporting every person aged 65 or older in the developed world. In Europe, this will drop to just two.

Battle for resources: It is estimated that your group of the richest countries consumes double the resources used by the rest of the world. The UN estimates that if current population and consumption trends continue, by the 2030s we will need the equivalent of two Earths to support us.

Did you know? The average family size globally has declined by half since 1950 - from five children to the current 2.5.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-15391515

Cheers,

Aaron

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