Daily Digest

Daily Digest 10/18 - OWS And A Lesson In Democracy, Protest In Rome Hijacked By Rioters, What Is The Limit For Human Population?

Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 9:40 AM
  • A Lesson In Democracy And Our Most Excellent Adventure In NYC
  • Why did Occupy Wall Street take so long to happen?
  • Occupy protest in Rome hijacked by rioters who cause damage put at €2m
  • Europe’s (non) bailout plan predictable in its absurdity
  • New Natural Gas Deposit Discovered in Ukraine
  • Race to Build America’s First Offshore Windfarms
  • Ending Dispute, Well Partner Settles With BP for $4 Billion
  • Billions And Billions

Our 'What Should I Do?' guide has steps to cook, see & stay warm in times of power outage

Economy

A Lesson In Democracy And Our Most Excellent Adventure In NYC (JimQ)

Now it was time to find out for ourselves what this was all about. The second thing you notice after the smallness of the park is the overwhelming police presence. The street to the left is occupied by at least 25 NYPD vehicles. There are literally hundreds of uniformed policemen surrounding the park. There are metal police crowd control barriers encircling the site, so all who enter or leave must go through a narrow space.

Why did Occupy Wall Street take so long to happen? (InCalgary)

At one point protesters paraded on the Upper East Side, past the homes of the rich and famous. Were they imagining their own picnics on property that did not belong to them? More likely they were protesting the ongoing picnic that some of the most wealthy financiers have been enjoying at the rest of society’s expense.

In fact the real question about the exciting, disturbing, sometimes baffling and definitely growing Occupy Wall Street movement is not, what do they actually want, but what took them so long?

Occupy protest in Rome hijacked by rioters who cause damage put at €2m (jdargis)

Traffic signs were uprooted for use as weapons. Cars were set ablaze. One group looted a supermarket. Another broke into a church, carried out a crucifix and a statue of the Madonna and smashed both in the street outside.

A rudimentary bomb was planted and a member of a radical leftwing party lost three fingers when it went off as he tried to move it away from the route of the march.

Europe’s (non) bailout plan predictable in its absurdity (InCalgary)

This weekend’s G20 summit of finance ministers failed to provide for anything different. Here are just a few points from the final comments by the participants.

Energy

New Natural Gas Deposit Discovered in Ukraine (James S.)

The Ukrainian government has made it a high priority to attempt to develop its indigenous natural gas resources as quickly as possible in order to lessen its dependence on imports of Russian natural gas from state owned Gazprom, as the pricing issues have strained relations between Russia and Ukraine for years. Discussions are currently underway to revise both the cost of Gazprom natural gas to Ukraine and the transit fees that Ukraine charges Gazprom to use its pipeline network for exports.

Race to Build America’s First Offshore Windfarms (James S.)

Deepwater Wind has a number of projects on the table, but are planning for their wind farm near Block Island to be the first in the nation. At the industry conference, they announced the purchase of new large, radically-redesigned wind turbines from the German corporation, Siemens. Five six-megawatt turbines will be bought for the proposed $205 million project. According to Deepwater CEO, William Moore, "Believe it or not, the first offshore wind farm will probably happen in little Rhode Island."

Environment

Ending Dispute, Well Partner Settles With BP for $4 Billion (jdargis)

The settlement was not an admission of liability, said BP, whose investigation concluded that the accident was the result of multiple miscues involving several companies. BP continues to quarrel with its contractors, Transocean, which operated the rig, and Halliburton, which was responsible for cement work, about participating in the compensation payments. BP said Monday that the Anadarko settlement should set an example for the two contractors.

Billions And Billions (jdargis)

Predicting where the numbers will go from here is, at least in the short term, pretty straightforward. Fourteen years from now, there will be eight billion people on the planet. At around the same time, India will overtake China as the most populous nation on earth. Most of the growth will occur in the world’s poorer countries. Proportionally, Europe’s population will decline, while Africa’s will increase.

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3 Comments

ditchner's picture
ditchner
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 15 2009
Posts: 14
Woodman's picture
Woodman
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 26 2008
Posts: 1028
Lawrence Lessig: oppose crony capitalism

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lawrence-lessig/a-letter-to-the-occupiers_b_1007459.html

" This government is dependent upon the Funders of campaigns. 1% of America funds almost 99% of the cost of political campaigns in America. Is it therefore any surprise that the government is responsive first to the needs of that 1%, and not to the 99%?

 

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 3936
The CF Bruhaha

Forbes

Oilprice.

It is well and good for Rossi to take a sledge hammer to his sceptics by way of a working 1 MW steam plant. But the rest of us want to know what kind of potential this approach may offer in providing a brand new source of cheap and abundant energy. We also want to know if an entire new branch of physics is about to be opened, with all the possibilities for new scientific knowledge and technology which that might mean.

Whinge, whinge, whinge.

Wired

Ex-Darpa chief Tony Tether told New Energy Times that "If it is a hoax, it's a damned good one."

And Computerworld

So, while the internal combustion engine is one of the key technological achievements that define Western culture, it took more than a century for the impact of the technology to become widespread. As technological revolutions go, that one was pretty slow.

All gathered together by our own gem, Ruby Carat.

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