Podcast

Chris Answers Your Questions (Part 1)

Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 1:21 PM

It's the big man's turn in the hot seat today.

A few weeks ago, we asked you, the CM.com community, what questions you would most like to hear Chris address in an interview. You weren't shy!

I sat down with a stack of your questions ranging from precious metals investing to global warming to what Chris does to blow off steam and grilled Dr. M as best I could.

The good news is that there's a lot of meat in here for the serious CM.com reader. The 'bad' news is that we only made it halfway through your questions so we'll do this again soon if the feedback from this interview is positive.

Let us know your thoughts in the Comments section below. And if there are questions you'd like Chris to address in our next interview with him, add them here.

Click the play button below to listen to my interview with Chris (runtime 41m:58s): 

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71 Comments

Doug's picture
Doug
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Great Q&A

Thank you Chris.  You presented your views in a lucid way that we can all use to better understand your message.  I look forward to your next podcast.

The one segment that most struck home is the last in which you commented on whether tptb understand the concepts and issues dealt with on this blog.  I have long wondered about that and suspected that you are right.  They do.  To me that is particularly sinister as they seem to be doing nothing to address the many problems or to even prosecute the many malefactors who plunged the economy into it's near (and it isn't over) collapse.  After listening to the podcast I ventured over to tfmetalsreport.com where Turd is in fine form today.  He posted three articles by Jim Sinclair and another by Jim Quinn that paint our current circumstances in rather dire terms.

http://www.tfmetalsreport.com/blog/3394/latest-jim-quinn

http://www.tfmetalsreport.com/blog/3392/whats-santa

I'm wondering whether you view our situation similarly, and if so, how you maintain your emotional equilibrium and don't run around with your hair on fire. 

Doug

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Nichoman
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Worthwhile

Please consider doing this on a periodic basis (i.e. monthly or quarterly).

Never seen long term success that doesn't include bottom up:  1.) involvement, 2.) empowerment and 3.) feedback.

This partially facilitates this.

Note:  Your comments that key decision makers are aware is key.   Essentially too many promises, not enough will to change until we crash.   Investments to consider...enough said.

 

Nichoman 

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dmger14
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I always get nuggets of

I always get nuggets of wisdom from Chris.  My biggest jewel from this interview is when he said there is a tremendous gap between the policies our politicians are pushing for and the reality that even they know is true.  It was inconceivable to me that someone can act contrary to their own knowledge on matters of such importance, but I believe it 100% that this is going on.  I remember Daniel Hannan's blasting the English Prime Minister for doing the same with debt over there in the UK about two years ago.  Amazing but true...

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Jbarney
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Hi,I just listened to the

Hi,

I just listened to the podcast, it was excellent.  Hope you guys continue to do this.  I am sure the number of questions from visitors will go go up and down.  Let us know if you need more.

I found the section near the end about the current crop of politicians and business people being aware of the possibility of a 3E future kinda sad.  I used to be in politics.  Was a member of the Vermont Legislature.  I think it is awful that a group entrusted with the leadership responsibility of a society.... refuse to take action.  Either they have the information and shrug it off or they are totally shirking their duties as those entrusted to make decisions.

I have to wonder if they have access to the information and just refuse to believe.

Jason

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CA9944
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Looking forward to the new website

Adam Taggart: Great. Well, one little commercial to make, too, is that with the new site we will be launching in two months, we will be adding essentially a data dashboard on the site for a lot of the most common sources that you mentioned that you look at. So if folks want to be looking at the same types of data that you are looking at on a regular basis, we will have that dashboard in place.

Yahoo!

 

dps's picture
dps
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foreign accounts

I'm working on my tax stuff.
I'm confused about this:
Is my bullion an "account" or an "asset"?
It appears to be a different form depending on which it is. 

I'm sure there are many of us that would benefit from an answer on this.
... dons

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
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never ceases to amaze me....

It never ceases to amaze me how much Chris and I think in parrallel.  I've always thought that TPTB must know what is going on, and yet do nothing....  but it is both gratifying and reassuring that he thinks so as well.

Hence my resolute wish that the crash occurs as soon as possible, because NOTHING will happen until their hands are forced to...

What a crazy world....

Great podcast BTW.  Must see about getting involved in the next one!

Mike

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Jim H
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Dons...

What bullion are you talking about?  You really should take it with you on a canoe trip sometime.  Although many have had bad experiences and lost theirs in various bodies of water.. I am sure this would never happen to you. 

Cool podcast Chris and Adam.  I look forward to the new website dashboard... a great idea and one that you can build on as we see it and get the feel of it.  Maybe we could even create some of our own indicators to watch as well, i.e. Dow:Gold ratio, etc...  

I will say this too... one of the things that came through for me was how really bright and attuned Adam is... what a great team!   Thanks, Jim

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Travlin
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Partial answer
dps wrote:

I'm working on my tax stuff.
I'm confused about this:
Is my bullion an "account" or an "asset"?
It appears to be a different form depending on which it is. 

I'm sure there are many of us that would benefit from an answer on this.
... dons

Dps

If it is held through an account out of the US the IRS requires a report which I explained in this link. http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/june-30-deadline-report-foreign-accounts-irs/59671 As far as I know they don’t require any report if it is held in the US unless you sell it for a gain. If you sell for a loss you can report it to lower your tax. I’m not entirely sure about the US held issue though.

Travlin 

 

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nickbert
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what a treat...

Chris/Adam,

Great listen, and I'm really looking forward to that data dashboard!  Perversely enough, ever since leaving the 8-to-5 regular employment world I find I have a lot less time to devote to daily web news and information  .  Being able to see the more critical data and changes in a quick minute would be a godsend, especially when travelling.  As you mention Zerohedge is great and quick in mentioning noteworthy developments, but sometimes it's too easy to get wrapped up in reading a dozen different things and get sidetracked when I have other things that need doing  .

- Nick

Mark Cochrane's picture
Mark Cochrane
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Global Warming

Chris and community,

Great podcast but I feel like I've been called out. As a research scientist and professor who works with and teaches climate science, I've been contemplating opening a forum discussion on the matter for a while now. I have gained quite a lot from all of the postings, links and information presented on this site and have been looking for a way to give back.

For those who are interested, I will open up a thread under the "Controversial Topics" section of the forums modeled on some of the "Definitive" threads that I have found very useful about Global Warming (aka Global Climate Change) science.

The intent is to be informative. I will try to provide clear understandable information on what the science (not the various talking heads/activists) can and cannot tell us about global and regional climate change. I will also do my best to answer questions people may have about the matter.

This is an important topic that really should not have been politicized.  I will not treat it in an ideological manner. If you are interested in constructive discussion and the best information I can provide then I will do my best to hold up my end.

Stan Robertson's picture
Stan Robertson
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Nuggets of wisdom from Chris
dmger14 wrote:

I always get nuggets of wisdom from Chris.  My biggest jewel from this interview is when he said there is a tremendous gap between the policies our politicians are pushing for and the reality that even they know is true.  It was inconceivable to me that someone can act contrary to their own knowledge on matters of such importance, but I believe it 100% that this is going on.  I remember Daniel Hannan's blasting the English Prime Minister for doing the same with debt over there in the UK about two years ago.  Amazing but true...

In all deference to jbarney, most of the politicians are a lot like the rivers on the plains - a mile wide and an inch deep. They tend to triangulate among surface positions without any deep understanding. They are especially ignorant in matters of science. On economics, they stay close to the concerns of their voting public. That is why everyone loves their own congress persons while realizing that congress as a whole is incompetent.

RJE's picture
RJE
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Adam and Chris...Great Stuff

...how did I ever miss that this was on the agenda!? So many conformational statements made in one place. Cool.

OK, the RED pill conversation was terrific. Since I mentally switched from a business that my Father started in 1945 after the War, and I began this new career which was to learn everything about commodities, particularly OIL, and to a lessor degree GOLD (which I have always had a fascination with), and all things Geography, Geology, and politics. I have always enjoyed the business my Father began, and I took over in 1975 after serving honorably in the Navy, as a Sea Bee, and I loved it. After taking the RED pill, I seen the world way differently, the colors were brighter, the smells, my garden took on more significance and my vegetable garden, and the work of amending soils for different plants. I could completely relate to that conversation. My son's lives changed for the better as my Lady and I moved them to a small 6 acre farm in the country, farm country, from Detroit where I had always lived. It was the year the Tigers won the World Series in 1984. The first question from my son's mouths were, "so what are we going to do out here?". I looked around and said that "well, I don't see any kids so I get your concern. I bet they jump on their bikes and ride to the park and play ball or swim in the public pool". So that's what they did, 4 miles there and back and have had a terrific life, have graduated from college, and live wonderfully. What made this a magical move was it was June, the Tigers in a pennant race, my brother was playing major league ball as a catcher for the White Sox, and they contended for a bit that year too. So it was terrific, especially when Chicago came to Detroit, and we sectioned in the stands with the ballplayers wives and families, and we rooted for the Tigers. It would really piss (White Sox families) them folks off. We would get stuff from my brother after the games because the wives would complain. I just told him, "once a Tiger always a Tiger, I'll buy my own seats". We laughed, he sucked it up, but nothing changes. I rooted for my brother but my blood flows Tiger D. Jim H. from Livonia knows what I feel. Kaline, Demeter, Colavito, Cash, Wert, Kell, McClain, Lolich, Oyler, Horton, Brown, etc... I met them all. Kaline, I golfed with, with my brother in a four-some. The highlight of MY LIFE!!! 

The ballplayers is where I started buying gold, and is another story.

jrf29 and I have been musing for a few days over at the Podcast you had recently with Charles Eisenstein, and what struck me with your comments about if you were President, and what again was an affirming bit of your thoughts Chris on what you would do. I am sure jrf29 if he listened to this podcast would agree that we are both in line with your thoughts. Personally, I find this very gratifying because it suggests we are on the same page, and that feels great. Your suggestion of paying a billion dollar prize was a no brainer, and should be done to get a commercial sized battery. Lastly, I have thought from day one when Reagan was just starting office that his order to remove the solar panels from the White House was demeaning, of one President to another, and a major set back for the conservation of energy in this country. Not to mention the narrative sent that haunts us today. That being, the American people are somehow entitled to ease, and cheapness of energy. Reagan, who I loved, error-ed big time though with that message. Not in hindsight either, I felt it then, and feel it still now. The entitlement issue hasn't served us well either because every politician since Reagan has sold the America people on this never to fullfil promise in all sectors of economy, that everything is free. Health care, Social Security, blah, blah, blah. That's called unintended consequences folks. We'll pay or we won't receive the services that's evident.

OK, my question is related to time. It is my personal belief that we will have several deflationary, and Inflationary events before our troubles get escalated to a Depression or Great Depression and from an Inflationary event to a Hyperinflation event. I have problems with when you (Chris) perceive a Hyperinflation event is likely to occur? As I look around the world all I see is Deflation on the horizon due to DEBT. From Japan, to Europe to China, and an imminent hard landing. All severe monetary contractions. I see the United States needing Austerity, probably taxation, and a balance sheet contraction from Credit/Debt. All these examples are Deflationary. So, I have to bet on what I see. OIL would be another hard driver of Deflation. I also see a tremendous amount of dollar creation that will support allot of Inflation when and if this paper starts moving in the real economy, and it really hasn't as most reliable indicators show. So, what is this timeline for Hyperinflation?  What am I missing here? Last quick question: Chris I have baggies full of gold necklaces, pendants and such (I have this offsite and protected). Never have I paid anything but spot minus 15% on the weight for this Gold. You never have really talked much about this. If I recall the government never confiscated jewelry so why is this not a part of your narrative here? Have I made a mistake? Thank you

BOB

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thatchmo
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What the heck?!

Thirteen comments and not one seconding Chris's nomination for Thatchmo for president?  I'm tempted to quote Pat Paulson ("If nominated, I will not run.  If elected, I will not serve." for you young 'uns).  But as a patriotic American, called to duty,  I will serve.  If someone will only fund a SuperPAC, and I'm allowed to lead from Kauai.  It wouldn't be worth it if I had to move to Washington.  Thanks for the personal and refreshing podcast Chris and Adam.  Looking forward to the next one.  Aloha, Steve.

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Stan Robertson
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What is missing?
robert essian wrote:

... I have problems with when you (Chris) perceive a Hyperinflation event is likely to occur? As I look around the world all I see is Deflation on the horizon due to DEBT. From Japan, to Europe to China, and an imminent hard landing. All severe monetary contractions. I see the United States needing Austerity, probably taxation, and a balance sheet contraction from Credit/Debt. All these examples are Deflationary. So, I have to bet on what I see. OIL would be another hard driver of Deflation. I also see a tremendous amount of dollar creation that will support allot of Inflation when and if this paper starts moving in the real economy, and it really hasn't as most reliable indicators show. So, what is this timeline for Hyperinflation?  What am I missing here? . . .

BOB

While it is true that a lot of debt has already been defaulted, the huge stores of debt are in the nearly worthless paper and derivatives held by the big banks of the world. The PIIGs of Europe can never pay their debts. Greece will default, but it won't be called a default. What will happen instead is that the Fed and other central banks will monetize the debts - eventually all of them. Eventually all of that thin air money might enter the world economy and that by itself would would be highly inflationary. However, if oil, the actual real source of value in the world, becomes simultaneously in short supply its price would rise to the point that demand would be reduced to the level of the available supply. While oil prices would be high, the net effect of serious oil shortage would be a very depressed world economy. Realities would force us to abandon the growth paradigm and eventually restructure our currencies, perhaps by adopting something like a gold standard.

But suppose that one has prepared for this by buying physical gold. Exactly how one turns this back into liquidity in some stable currency of the future is a mystery to me. At a minimum you will be hit with huge capital gains taxes, and at worst, the government will find some way to take most of your gold's value. My question is, what is the way out of this wicket?

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Arthur Robey
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Jackpot! A climate scientist.

Good on you for coming out of the closet Mark.

I have being trying to find out what the Gulf stream is doing.

Is it associated with this cold snap that we are having in Europe? Do you have any websites that doesn't begin with a lecture on the fact that the Gulf Strean makes England warmer but does tell you if there is any slowing down of the conveyor?

It would be a tremendous party trick if it stops.

Doug's picture
Doug
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Mark Cochrane wrote: Chris
Mark Cochrane wrote:

Chris and community,

Great podcast but I feel like I've been called out. As a research scientist and professor who works with and teaches climate science, I've been contemplating opening a forum discussion on the matter for a while now. I have gained quite a lot from all of the postings, links and information presented on this site and have been looking for a way to give back.

For those who are interested, I will open up a thread under the "Controversial Topics" section of the forums modeled on some of the "Definitive" threads that I have found very useful about Global Warming (aka Global Climate Change) science.

The intent is to be informative. I will try to provide clear understandable information on what the science (not the various talking heads/activists) can and cannot tell us about global and regional climate change. I will also do my best to answer questions people may have about the matter.

This is an important topic that really should not have been politicized.  I will not treat it in an ideological manner. If you are interested in constructive discussion and the best information I can provide then I will do my best to hold up my end.

There is already a long thread that is not in the CT dungeon:

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/global-climate-change-it-worth-brushing/5895

Welcome to it.

Doug

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lifestyle changes

 Chir, Adam, hope these kinds of podcasts with Chris can become a regular event.  Seems like a great way, like the "Off the Cuff" segments with Mish, to show what Chris is currently thinking, without taking a lot of time and preparation for the research involved in the Martenson Reports.

Chris commented here and in previous articles his changes in interests and lifestyle from a VP with a big company to a simpler, more full filling life.  I'm not sure about all of the CM audience, but I suspect many of modet means including me have been in a position more like where Chris is now all along, and never had aspirations for high profile, lavish lifestyles anyway and always knew at some conscious or subconcious level a somewhat simpler life was better, even absent the risks of the 3 E's.   However, should much more austerity be needed or forced upon us in the future, that transistion step could be much more difficult and painful.  I'm curious how much more change Chris feels he needs to make or wants to make in lifestyle henceforth?

Tom 

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Stan Robertson...

...as I look at Europe I feel that Greece is wholly underrated. I see a Lehman moment there. So lots of Deflation. My thesis is that we have a serious recession in Europe, lots of debt destruction, and then paper printing.  From Greece to Portugal, then Ireland, then Spain, and Italy? This seems like an issue that will be with us for many years. Plus the US has got to move on its DEBT too, time is a wasting. Iran? What an unknown there. If oil goes to $150 to $200 a barrel then the whole thing crashes that's for darn sure. Iran will not be contained, and it will be long and arduous. OIL prices maintained at these costs will wreak havoc on the world economies. The supply/demand issue are razor thin now, and so the speculators will do what they do, and elevated OIL will be the outcome until the system breaks. By all indicators this will not be pretty. What insurance company will insure multi billion dollar vessels traveling through the tight channels in the Straights of Hormuz? China is not in good shape here, they have no stimulus that won't super charge their inflation containment. Also their housing is really getting slammed, and dollars are being destroyed. Think US housing and you'll have a visual where their headed. To my question then, I think, and would like very much some clarity on this. Is hyperinflation still out into the future? If my thesis is correct then we will have this wash, rinse, and repeat cycle for quite some time. That being deflation then inflation. The printing can only really begin once it is determined how much debt has been destroyed. Until then I feel the ECB and the FED are hand tied are my thoughts. If this is the case, and we have several of these fits and starts then as investors we could really do well for ourselves thus putting ourselves in a very good position to capitalize, and protect our families better our wealth. Please, anyone with a clear mind to what I am asking here would be beneficial to all I would suspect. Certainly to me. I respect everyone, and will read, and gather all opinions. So far this strategy, and preparation have benefited me very well but I really don't know, I am insecure that I am missing something because of my still lacking due diligence. The efforts there, but my visuals are skewed a bit.. Respectfully submitted

BOB

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featherjack
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Thank you for sharing this with all of us!

I'm one who reads you regularly, but cannot afford to subscribe. I just wanted to thank you, Chris, for doing this and putting it up for all to read/hear. I think a lot of us with less financial abundance see the real deal in the world today, and can use what is here. I know I appreciate The Crash Course and this site, and all the time and work you've put into it.

I can't wait for the new site with the dashboard!

Thanks again, Chris, and all who participate. Sharing what we know and and have is the way we will survive and thrive. And it feels good too! 

 

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Good morning Aurthur,Here

Good morning Aurthur,

Here is a site that tracks daily current velocities for the Gulf stream (http://rads.tudelft.nl/gulfstream/). Note, it doesn't tell you a darned thing about the hows, whys or importance of the gulf stream for European climate. For those who don't know, the gulf stream transports a lot of heat from the tropics to more northerly areas. The net effect being milder winters for Europe than should be expected given the latitude of the region. A big part of this process is the sinking of cold dense (salty) water in the North Atlantic. The fear is that if the ice sheet in Greenland melts quickly it will flood the region with fresh water that will dilute the salty water and slow down or stop the conveyor belt and result in a colder Europe.

All that said, this year's freezing temperatures in Central Europe have more to do with the jet stream than the Gulf Stream. There is a stable high pressure area in the vicinity or greenland/iceland and the jet stream is looping around it. Last year both the eastern US and Europe got frozen. This year Central/Eastern Europe is getting even worse treatment while the eastern US is ridiculously warm  because the northern jet stream isn't dipping far enough south to join with the southern jets.

This is a depiction of 2010 from www.weather.com. I can't find a current one for this year right now but it illustrates the idea.  Polar air is spilling south. The fact that this is happening isn't so unusual but the strength and duration are making it deadly. There are a variety of schools of thought but many think that this sort of pattern will increase in frequency as the polar ice cap continues to melt. This is why global climate change is more accurate than calling it global warming. The average temperature of the planet is going up but the we don't live in the average weather. Climate chaos is a more accurate description of what differing regions will experience.

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Stan Robertson
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Robert Essian

Bob,

The inflation/deflation arguments have continued here for a long time. In our debt based money system debt = money. Default on debt is deflationary. Money printing to paper over the losses of creditors is inflationary. That gives them money to spend without having produced anything of value. As you pointed out, this could go on for a long time before the world is purged of bad debt. Hyperinflation is printers gone mad. I think that is unlikely to occur, but if oil prices continue to rise we will likely have the stagflation of the 70s when oil prices doubled three times in a decade. Currency values were halved in only a few years. That was severe inflation, but not hyperinflation. What happens if a black swan Lehman moment occurs is hard to predict. There could be widespread chaos. If Greece can be eased out of the eurozone without a financial meltdown then maybe the rest of the PIIGS problems can be resolved without complete collapse. I agree with you that Greece is a very underrated problem.

Stan

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Out of the Dungeon?

Hello Doug,

I was surprised when I couldn't find any threads on global climate change, I guess I was looking in the wrong place. My understanding was that the subject matter was relegated to the 'dungeon' so I suppose that is why I didn't find the appropriate thread! It looks like there is quite a bit to sift through to catch up with the ongoing discussion! Thanks for the heads up.

Mark

 

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RJE
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Stan and Mark...

Thanks Stan, I do understand what you are saying. Unfortunately ,until events unfold will I get my answers. I have a pretty good idea where this is going near term though, and what happens in Greece will not be contained, of that I will bet on. UK bond laws will see to that. Plus, if I'm Ireland, Portugal, Spain or even Italy I have taken solid notes of the treatment of Greece. The sovereigns, and the banks are in trouble. The banks are most certainly not telling the truth to their exposure to Greece, as our banks aren't, so it all shakes out by March 20th, and the banks get exposed with the new LTRO due Feb 29th. These are exciting times for those who love this stuff, and as a novice I can say this stuff is a thrill for me. I may sound somewhat masochistic with my excitement, and observations but it is happening (not of my doing), and I have a front row seat. Lastly, Oil at $119 and change in Europe, and $100 and rising in the US is going to kill, just kill the consumer who is still reeling from 2008. Plus we have Iran come June or whatever. Our policy towards Iran is just plain stupid, a word I cringe at ever expressing but it is, stupid that is. Regards 

Bob

 

Mark, I look forward to your research. Listen, I have thought that the volcanic eruption in Iceland and Russia had a play in the jet stream not moving too far South this winter. What can you tell me about this. In addition the El Ni no in the Pacific too. I am interested in everything so I apologize in advance if I am persistent. Thank you in advance.

BOB 

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Great Interview

Adam and Chris,

I really enjoyed this format.  We tend to hear lots about the problems of the moment over and over, but little about each of our individual concerns.  This allows all of us to ask personal questions directly to Chris and get his candid response.  Great job!

Chris said:  "I have absolutely sort of lost my thread on – like sports really, really drove me hard. I could have told you all the stats on the Duke basketball team, where I used to go, and football teams and all of that. Somehow I find myself less concerned with things that used to be really passionate for me. So it shifted a lot in my life personally."

Chris, make 1 exception and watch the last 2 minutes of the Duke NC game - a classic!

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Volcanoes and El Nino

Bob,

Interest is good! Apologies are  not necessary. Fair warning though, I sometimes disappear to odd parts of the planet for weeks at a time, so response times can be erratic.

I don't think that the volcanoes are having an effect on the jet stream in the northern hemisphere this year. Although there was some injection of sulfer dioxide into the stratosphere the effects are to basically to reflect sunlight. Such eruptions can be globally important if they are 1) big enough and 2) occur near the equator. In higher latitudes they can be important regionally but they have to be big and the effect is going to be to cool summer temperatures. They don't have detectable climate signals in winter because there is relatively little sunlight striking the region at that time of year to reflect.In any case, the amount of sulfuric acid drops relatively quickly, with most removed in months and almost all within 1 year.

 

With regard to El Nino, it is still on hold. La Nina isn't giving up quite yet. We had a double dip and the current forecast is for 'neutral' conditions to occur sometime in the March-May time frame. I'm stuck waiting on El Nino to get the data I need for some work in Indonesian peat swamps! If you have a morbid curiosity for the current state of the tropical pacific ocean and all things ENSO check out NOAA's site

 

Mark

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timeandtide
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Robbing Peter to pay Paul

 I was disappointed in the approach Chris would take as a president. He assumes, like all politicians do, that he has the answers and so would embark on a course of picking winners. Namely, mandating the use of natural gas for energy infrastructure, the use of solar hot water heaters instead of electric/gas/oil fired heaters and giving a billion dollars to industry to find a solution to the energy storage problem. Then he goes on to suggest we need a visionary leader. This is a favourite idea of business schools and I don’t buy it. We have had too many dangerous visionaries (Napoleon, Stalin, Hitler, Mao). In fact the only visionary speech that I can think of was that of Kennedy which launched the Apollo program and that may have been more a reaction to the Russians undoubted lead in space exploration at the time.

My point is that no individual has the answers that justify directing enormous funding in any particular direction because, as always, it means taking funding away from some sector of the economy and spending it somewhere else. Robbing Peter to pay Paul. Governments should not interfere in the economy at all other than to do their best to ensure a level playing field and very strict accounting of all economic flows. Not just money flows but energy and waste flows. I am referring to “externals”, the quaint euphemism for all those side effects of the human economy that affect our biosphere in detrimental ways. Government is the only structure that could realistically oversee such accounting. No doubt there would be much argument and difficulty in attaching monetary value to externals. The idea being to create a level playing field for the various forms of energy so that the market-place will make the decision based on the best information inputs and cost outcome. With regard to the use of carbon based non-renewables or renewables (essentially solar and nuclear), we are still far from creating a level playing field. There has to be some kind of cost attached to carbon which is at the heart of the energy industry which drives our world. Clearly, we are not going to be able to do away with non-renewables for a good while because of the need for base load power but leveling the playing field is essential. Not so much because it may help slow down climate change but because it does not make much sense to be using non-renewable energy right up to the point when we either run out or it just becomes too expensive. As Chris pointed out, if gas becomes the fuel of transport then it simply will not last as long as we may hope. It does not make sense to be using non-renewable anything. The natural world, outside the human world, sustains itself by constant re-cycling and renewal. Disasters happen and populations fall but nothing is wasted, other than lives, because everything goes back into the organic pool again. Conditions get better and populations flourish again. We, on the other hand, have allowed governments to indulge in a relentless devotion to welfare and healthcare. Nothing wrong with either as a safety net but we have gone from a sensible system of properly funded maintenance to one which is now beyond accounting and has become a moral hazard. All governments are borrowing recklessly from the future to cover present promises. Pharmaceutical and medical companies receive endless research grants and subsidies while we become less fit and more obese. Not only are we wasteful of resources but we lay waste to all around us. It is estimated that between one third and one half of all food production is wasted. That suggests that a similar amount of land which might otherwise be part of the natural environment has been ploughed or fenced in for livestock.

I also think Chris was a little glib in the way he slid out of the knotty issue of global warming. If behavioral economics is right in suggesting that humans pay attention to the clear and immediate and discount the future, then why are we not using that knowledge to more effectively manage our future? It is all very well to be looking for technological solutions, the magic wand, but in reality so much of the human predicament is caused by human behavior about which we have amassed a considerable store of knowledge and yet we seem incapable of using this knowledge to persuade people to act in their better interest. At this point we could come full circle in my argument and end up with the idea that someone, or government, knows best and use the power that government has to coerce people into doing what is thought to be the right thing. How do we resolve this dilemma? What are the civic structures and channels along which power can operate that makes intelligent use of all inputs? I think that a lot of our problems stem from the idea that there are no limits. I am not American, but English and have lived in Australia for 35 years, but sense that placing limits on anything goes against the American ethos. This is ironical in that we all have one hugely inconvenient limit that cuts in on average around the 80th year for those of us lucky enough to live in the first world. Philosophy and religion are no longer a substantial part of the education we provide our children and so that this single extraordinary difference between us and other living beings, that we know that we will die, is barely reflected upon by most (younger) people today. How many know of the circumstances of Socrates death? There is a lesson to all of us there.

Another thing that struck me was that Chris owned up to “constantly checking the price of gold, oil, stock markets, credit default swaps.” Fair enough, I do the same myself and I realize that Chris is seeking information as an “early warning indicator.” An early warning indicator of what and with what intention of action in mind? Is this really useful information?  All the data suggests that most people lose in the markets because they follow the herd in at the top and out at the bottom. Right now, for example, there is such a one way sentiment with regard to the price of gold that I really have my doubts that the gold price will pan out the way people are expecting. Equally, there has been huge expectation that the US stock market would fall but it has gone up relentlessly, despite every fundamental reason for it not to do so. My point here is that there is no such thing as an investment anymore, except perhaps in oneself and one’s family or community, because the entire financial world has turned into a casino where it is all but impossible to ascribe a fair nominal value to anything. Any asset can only be looked at in terms of relative value and risk. I simply do not understand values any more.

How does one make sense of the latest $500 billion of support from the Federal Reserve to Europe. I remember only 30 years ago when it was optimistically announced by the WHO or the FAO that the under-nourished of the world could easily be fed for around $3 billion a year! It is no wonder that usury is condemned in the Bible and by Moslems. Why is that? Could it be that previous civilizations have seen what happens when people get paid for lending money rather than brains and effort. Banking and lending is not a Dutch or English invention. It has been going on for thousands of years and I am sure the ancients found out what happens when money is created out of thin air but charged for by those who have no skin in the game. Is this not something we should be discussing instead of the price of gold next year?

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Arthur Robey
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The chaotic climate.

Thank You Mark.

So here is the culprit.

It is the loopy jet stream.

Looking at the animation of the Gulf Stream  I am struck by how narrow it is and how chaotic.

Being a visual kind of guy I offer you this picture

You see that thin blue smear that the sun shines through? Well, thats it folks. Thats the atmosphere. Our common waste dump. And we want to dump how many tonnes of coal gas effluent into it?

930 billion short tons.

Perhaps that might not be wise. You may want to breath the stuff.

Unless you are on SRI's of cause. In which case megga death will not worry you. (Note to self: Stock up.)

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RJE
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Timeandtide...

...I read every word you wrote, and everyone is certainly entitled to ones opinion.

I absolutely, positively, without question, would, during my first minute in office begin a strong, clear, out the the gate sprinting, never look back, build out of our nations natural gas asset. Manage this industry to get a real sense of what natural gas we actually have before allowing cars to be added to the natural gas mix. Trucks would be my initial earmark,  

In addition I would give as a prize 10 Billion dollars, not 1 Billion as Chris suggests to the first nerd who proves up a commercial sized battery storage system. I would then share the technology with the world if all agree to verifiably dismantle nuclear bombs. 

I would in conjunction to this, modernize our electrical grid, and make as a goal to capture what we produce in the form of electrical energy, and lose to the atmosphere (30% wasted every day).

I would build out the electric rail.

I would require the phasing out of all wasteful gadgets on all appliances (I hate flashing 12:00 on anything) and require these appliances to set the standard for home conservation of energy.

I would require that all buildings monitor, and control the wasteful lighting of their buildings when not in use.

I would raise the taxes on gasoline, and all fossil fuels. It would be a tax based on the MPG of your car or truck. If you drive an SUV then you get taxed the most. For example: 10 to 15 miles per gallon pays $.10 cents extra per gallon.15 to 25 pay .7 cents and any car getting 25 to 30 miles a gallon pays $.05 cents. Anything over 30 miles per gallon pay no taxes. All these funds are segregated, and used only for the training of the work force needed for the maintenance and construction of this electrical infrastructure.

I would put out for bid the build out for wind farms from the Texas panhandle up to the Canadian border of North Dakota. I would use any dessert, for the mass production of sun driven electrical energy.

Alongside all of these projects I would have experts in the field of wild animals to quickly asses , remove, and place in similar environment the beautiful creatures of this world that would be stressed.

I would use all offshore coastal winds to produce electricity, and its waste products as fuel for our countries needs.

I would require that the utility companies install solar panels on all homes, maintenence them, and then regulate a fair monthly fee for this expense. I would add this energy to the smart grid, and also for the use as a hot water energy source at said residence. 

I would build depots where trains would bring all goods to a central location to be picked up by truck, and have those trucks use compressed natural gas to move these goods.

I would order that all environmentalist (of which I am one) have their mouths duct taped for a period of 10 years, and use all common sense measures to accomplish our national goals.

I would ban the use of all plastic containers, and let the market figure out a bio degradable container that would be beneficial to the environment. It must decompose completely within 2 months of some knucklehead who tosses it from their vehicle.

I would then order that at the completion of the electrical build out the removal of all dams where harm to the ecosystem has been identified. All farm land down stream would be exempt if harmed.

I would re-stock all rivers and lakes with fish common to that area.

Then I would sit, and have my first cup of coffee...Then ponder my next hour in office.

BOB 

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RJE
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Ist cup of coffee is finished...

...and I have been pondering what I have accomplished in my first hour in office with every sip.

I have removed gazillions of tons of CO2 from the atmosphere.

I have ended the nuclear arms race, and probably nuclear power (although I like this power source on ships) 

I have brought home all my babies fighting or planning to fight wars over energy.

I have created millions of jobs.

Essentially I have saved the planet, and all of mankind because I incentivize some really smart individuals into inventing a battery that business can now use to asses their energy costs for the foreseeable future.

I can visualize that in 20 years all internal combustion engines used in cars and light duty trucks are now a relic of the past.

I have lessened the cost on health care because all harmful pollutants associated with the burning of fossil fuels.

I have hired as my Czar Dr. Chris Martenson, and given him all necessary powers to accomplish this mandate. He has hired Erik.T as his mouth piece/bouncer/enforcer.

I have not spent any tax payer dollars of any consequence on this electrical build out. I have left this project to the private sector, and have only provided the vision. "Ask not what your country can do for you, but rather, what you can do for your country (the world)".  I love Australia, the English too...BOB

PS: Adam now works for the White House, and facilitates and cleans up all the damage done by Erik.T vigor towards his new position. Adam is very busy. LOL

 

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Chris answers your questions

Excellent feature that needs to continue. For me, Chris's insight and commentary is the filler that connects all the seemingly unrelated world data into a cohesive picture.  I particularly enjoy that Chris balances the darkness with suggestions and resources that will assist you to not only survive but in fact improve your quality of life.

I'm looking forward to the next podcast.

 

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Bob

 You won't get elected until things get a whole lot worse.

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You got my vote!

You got my vote!

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Much gratitude

 This is awesome, please field questions on a periodic basis.

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RJE
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Mark, this was interesting...

...if you hadn't heard this then enjoy.

BOB

http://www.financialsense.com/financial-sense-newshour

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Mark Cochrane
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Definitely interesting

I had not heard this and wouldn't have looked for it there. I don't know this group or there accuracy but they are discussing all of the various cycles in a very synthetic way that is interesting. I was surprised a by the emphasis on the Iceland volcano. I'd have to check, but I didn't think that the statospheric emissions had been so high or so great. The effects in winter should be smaller than they were in the summer.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

 

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sofistek
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Surprised At Some Answers

Like timeandtide, I was surprised at Chris's answer about what he'd do if he were president, and also at the previous answer, about natural gas, though for different reasons. Subsequently, I was disappointed at Chris's answer on global warming.

The one on natural gas appeared to be missing a few things. Firstly, is this shale gas boom sustainable at current prices? What are the real figures if it is? I've heard recent commentary about 11-20 years of gas been more likely, if the boom is real. Resource figures are being downgraded all the time. There is the additional snippet that shale gas may be as bad as coal for the environment, with methane leaks. So looking for 10, 20, 50% take up of natural gas for transport seems crazy.

The president answer appears to be one that falls into the trap of all presidential hopefuls - who can all figure out how to keep this great nation of yours great, how you can get back on the growth path (though Chris didn't state that explicitly), creating meaningful jobs and leading the world in some technology. And so on. I thought the next 20 years is not going to look anything like the last? If this is an example of Chris as president, the change is purely in superficial stuff, not in anything long lasting, despite the investment in permaculture (which was about the only thing that seemed good). I'm surprised he didn't mention education as the first thing he would do - we need to tell ourselves an accurate story of where we are, so people need to be educated and not plied with constant messages about the consumer society and celebrity and technological miracles.

Then on to the environment. Perhaps the answer about natural gas not including the notion that it could be as bad as coal shoudl have hinted at the side-stepping answer on global warming. Heck, so what if it raises emotions? It isn't the only thing on this site that does. If it's important, it's important. Period. There wasn't much hint in Chris's answer that he thinks global warming (and its attendant climate change) is a problem that needs to be addressed now (despite extreme events increasing and becoming more extreme). Yes, if people are taking actions as a result of resource depletion that would be equally at home from a global warming perspective then great, but Chris dismissises the global warming argument as a means for gettting people to take action. What if the message about peak oil doesn't win people over? Perhaps an argument about the environment will. So use all weapons, if you want people to take action. In fact, the environment, as a whole, gets very little space here. What about the 6th extinction event that we're in? What about the crashing of phytoplankton levels and the overall state of the oceans? And a whole range of other things. We need the big picture, Chris, and all of the factors that go into the next 20 years being nothing like the last 20.

Tony

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Global Warming Debate

As someone who actively works in the field of climate science and its impacts, I obviously believe it to be very important but I can understand Chris' reticence to make it a major platform given the political firestorm that has been lit around it. I am quite certain that this could distract from the central message that the "Crash Course" and Chris have been trying to make.

It is hard, very hard, to stay up on climate science because it is 1) evolving rapidly, 2) involves many fields, and 3) often technical. The results are rarely definitive and there is no end of well-intentioned or downright nefarious disinformation spashed across the internet. It is difficult to separate good information from bad. Given the amount on his plate with economic, energy and resource issues, I doubt Chris could in good faith act as an information scout for climate change too, simply due to time constraints if nothing else. That said, the comments above seem to indicate that many people see this as an important issue that should be part of our collective debate on how to best prepare. I would agree.

Perhaps the situation has evolved to the point that we can have a mature debate about the issue without the political baggage. Just in the last year, 'skeptical' scientists, funded by those who most want the issue to go away, and accounting for most if not all of the supposed shortcomings of the previous science, confirmed that this is a real and growing problem (Global warming 'confirmed' by independent study). Can we now drop the ideological disagreements and moral arguments to just concentrate on defining how much of a problem we have and how we can best respond to it? Chris is right that much of the reponse to the Crash Course addresses climate change actions anyways, but what is missing is what climate change means for how we can live and what we will have to adapt to in the future. For what it is worth, my view of the issues goes as follows:

 

1) Economic upheaval - ongoing with worse imminent

2) Peak oil - inevitable and in process

3) Resource scarcity - links directly to peak oil

4) Climate change - a wild card, probably lowest priority for immediate preparation, ultimately the biggest problem we face

 

For those who are interested, there is a long time thread on climate issues (Global climate change: is it worth brushing off?) and I recently started a new thread (The Definitive Global Climate Change (aka Global Warming) thread) in the so-called basement.

Chris, if you get on the ballot I'll vote for you! If you get elected I'll be amazed and delighted. If you need a science advisor, give me a call.

 

Mark

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Chris + Stefan

 Another great interview with Chris by Stefan Molyneaux....

 

 

 gets most interesting a around t t= 40 mins. for the impatient / experienced..

 

 I just love the cross-fertilisation.... political, economic, personal, geopolitical, etc..

 and in the spirit of unification of understanding.. and having consumed 75cl of a lovely ozzie vintage..

 Have some RPF.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGcr_5pAVO8

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sofistek
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The right narrative
Mark Cochrane wrote:

For what it is worth, my view of the issues goes as follows:

 1) Economic upheaval - ongoing with worse imminent

2) Peak oil - inevitable and in process

3) Resource scarcity - links directly to peak oil

4) Climate change - a wild card, probably lowest priority for immediate preparation, ultimately the biggest problem we face

Given Chris's science background, one would have thought he has a good grasp of the climate issues and could easily talk about them. There are emotional and political arguments all the time about all of the issues Chris chooses to address on his site, so it is rather peculiar that he shies away from climate change. I'm not sure that I've ever heard him provide his opinion about whether climate change is happening and being cause primarily by humans, which is also odd.

Regarding the priority list above, I would expand point 4 to include all non-resource environmental issues and put it right at the top, well above the others. Of course, given almost everyone else's obsession with the economy, it's not an issue that would go to the top of most people's lists. However, I read an article somewhere recently (sorry can't find the link right now) which showed that US people actually did put climate change top of the concern list when asked different questions about it. The economy gets the short term vote but the environment gets the long term vote (in a reversal of the short term outlook). Given that most people are actually in life for the long term, the environment should be the number one issue all the time, with no compromises. The environment is the basis for all life, all societies, all economies. We ignore it at our peril and I can't, for the life of me, understand why Chris so resolutely refuses to address the subject. It is perhaps the biggest hole in this site and in his thinking.

Tony

Edit: Sorry, Mark, I misread your post a little. I can see that you are well on board, so far as seeing environmental issues (in particular climate change) as our biggest problem/predicament.

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ao
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give it rest Sofistek
sofistek wrote:
Mark Cochrane wrote:

For what it is worth, my view of the issues goes as follows:

 1) Economic upheaval - ongoing with worse imminent

2) Peak oil - inevitable and in process

3) Resource scarcity - links directly to peak oil

4) Climate change - a wild card, probably lowest priority for immediate preparation, ultimately the biggest problem we face

Given Chris's science background, one would have thought he has a good grasp of the climate issues and could easily talk about them. There are emotional and political arguments all the time about all of the issues Chris chooses to address on his site, so it is rather peculiar that he shies away from climate change. I'm not sure that I've ever heard him provide his opinion about whether climate change is happening and being cause primarily by humans, which is also odd.

Regarding the priority list above, I would expand point 4 to include all non-resource environmental issues and put it right at the top, well above the others. Of course, given almost everyone else's obsession with the economy, it's not an issue that would go to the top of most people's lists. However, I read an article somewhere recently (sorry can't find the link right now) which showed that US people actually did put climate change top of the concern list when asked different questions about it. The economy gets the short term vote but the environment gets the long term vote (in a reversal of the short term outlook). Given that most people are actually in life for the long term, the environment should be the number one issue all the time, with no compromises. The environment is the basis for all life, all societies, all economies. We ignore it at our peril and I can't, for the life of me, understand why Chris so resolutely refuses to address the subject. It is perhaps the biggest hole in this site and in his thinking.

Tony

Edit: Sorry, Mark, I misread your post a little. I can see that you are well on board, so far as seeing environmental issues (in particular climate change) as our biggest problem/predicament.

Your relentless passive aggressive nitpicking of almost everything Chris writes and says devalues any positive contributions you might make.

Maybe you should lighten up and watch this.

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sofistek
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ao wrote:Your relentless
ao wrote:

Your relentless passive aggressive nitpicking of almost everything Chris writes and says devalues any positive contributions you might make.

Maybe you should lighten up and watch this.

ao,

Thanks for posting my comment again. Carlin was quite funny but he obviously knew nothing about environmental issues. I'll lighten up when enough people take our predicament seriously - all of it.

Tony

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President Martenson

timeandtide's comment was a bit wordy but I agree with him that "the government that governs least, governs best".

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Tony...

...I/we share all of your concerns, I'll assume that we do anyways. I cannot speak for Chris, and won't. So I'll ask you a question: When not If a commercial sized battery that stores energy is developed doesn't the issue of global warming take a turn for the better? Can you not visualize the importance of this futuristic technology?  Can you not see that you/we/humanity wins? Do you not understand the set back that global warming has taken because of the fall out of those darn internal emails that were floated about on the Internet? The very ones that has set this global climate change debate back decades perhaps? Do you not understand that the billion dollar prize stands a better chance of being a reality before this climate change debate ever begins anew again? I understood this issue was dead the moment those emails were disclosed, whether they were true or not. So as an (common sense) environmentalist myself I looked for my next best hope. Battery Technology is not a distant hoped for technology. It will be developed so make it competitive, and rewarding, and some serious nerd will figure it out. Guaranteed. Time is a wasting so as president, that would be the first words spoken from my mouth. Here's how it might sound as I stand at the inaugural podium: My fellow Americans, and to my brothers and sisters in the world, I challenge all of you, and as a motivation to this discovery will pay the sum of 1 billion dollars, to anyone who can provide the world a commercial sized battery to store the energy of the sun, wind ,and capture the waste energy that is now produced world wide (so forth and so on)...Tony, I get goose bumps at the thought of this discovery, and what it would mean, lead too.

Tony, I have no issues with your abrasive style. Your prejudice towards all Americans is quite apparent, and is your choice. Which of course makes your message less than appealing to many. If you want your message to resonate, and require everyone to take global warming seriously then unfortunately you may be hurting the cause.  Is this about you, or about global warming? You seem like an intelligent person but frankly, for me, your over all message is a negative one. Don't get me wrong, I am not bothered by you, your words, and frankly could easily tune you out (so your message ends up in the trash bin). I would reflect on this a bit Tony, and ask yourself, is my message a motivating one or are my words just words to be discarded because of a strong bias against Americans.

It's your choice to be here, and I assume it is to spread the word. You have a captive audience  here but I'll let you in on something, I don't remember really what the hell you said only that my impression of you is as a snob. Perhaps it is about you, and if determined so in future threads then I'll just bypass you entirely. Now your message has truly been lost, at least on me. Perhaps I tune out all climate change debates, even go so far as to let others know that the climate change debate is for the radicals,.All because the scientific community that I relied on is just not trustworthy. So what else is new, everyone lies these days, even climatologists. Then like has happened on the Internet it goes viral, and hurts the cause just as those emails did. We are not the enemy Tony, perhaps that lies within.  Regards

BOB

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Bob...

Hello Bob,

I fail to see how someone so apparently well reasoned and obviously forward thinking as you can have bought a trumped up smear campaign so hook line and sinker that you could write off the entire scientific community forever "whether they were true or not". Regarding the true or not, it is noteworthy that all scientists have been cleared of wrongdoing by multiple investigations in multiple countries. If false accusations are now the same as truth then we are all truly lost. Someone could easily sift through the posts at this site, selectively misquote our statements or cherry pick a few inflammatory posts and label us all as a radical organization (or worse).

What I like about this site is that there are several points of view from many individuals who probably wouldn't normally be in a room discussing serious issues (say you, me and Tony for example). And yet, here we are, reading each others points of view, sometimes castigating each other, but finding enough common ground to at least interact.

Incidentally, I agree with you about the importance of battery technology, as such technology is critical for forwarding any truly functional alternative energy grid. However, the battery technology you are advocating for will most likely arise from the same scientific community, working under the same rules, that you seem to have lost faith in.

The problem with the information age is that it is also the disinformation age. Opinion has taken on the same value as fact for many. We live in a world of fiat-ideas that have no backing but are circulated as if they did. Is there any hard currency of knowledge that we can work from?

 

Mark

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"hard currrency of knowledge"
Mark Cochrane wrote:

The problem with the information age is that it is also the disinformation age. Opinion has taken on the same value as fact for many. We live in a world of fiat-ideas that have no backing but are circulated as if they did. Is there any hard currency of knowledge that we can work from?

 Mark

This phrase stood out for me as an important issue. 

People I know (including me) do such odd things with information AND mis-information - avoid it, believe it, obsess about it, become emotionally reactive about it, dis-associate from it....  Plus the more I learn the more it comes clear that we have been indoctrinated with mis-information quite expertly and systematically to forward the economic goals of others.  We have been trained not to fully apply ourselves.  I'm forming an opinion that a key opportunity/challenge of this age is for each of us to claim our own intelligence and use it fully as if it matters.  My working class, non-academic background does not encourage this attitude, but life sure is more interesting with it.  

BTW, for me human mental activity only becomes intelligent when the values of the heart are known and infuse the thinking.  Information and analysis without values and love are not yet intelligent.  So, Mark, there is as aspect of my "hard currrency of knowledge" - what does my heart see here?  In the case of climate change, my heart is howling that it enjoys, marvels in, loves and needs this planet and its current biosphere with an intensity outside any box that was ever offered me by politics, economics, science or religion.  That's the baseline for all information and analysis to rest on.  That's the master currency for this lifetime.  Now how to spend it...

I'll take any further mention of climate change to the designated threads and just say that I really value discussions that help clear up misinformation and create clarity about it.

Trusting our own thinking is definitely encouraged by Chris on this website - a lovely feature, eh? (Yup.  Canadian)  I'm quite sure we don't need to agree with each other to develope our mutual and aggregate intelligence.  Thank you all for taking the time to share your (very valuable)knowledge and fascinations.  Where we get on each other's nerves might be growing pains - out-of-practice humans re-learning community in a much more complex world than has ever existed to challenge us.

The interviews/articles and ensuing discussions here are helping me re-define wealth, bit by bit, on my own terms.  Maybe that makes you all part of my new hard currency of wealth - right up there with silver.  (Oops - another sticky topic!)

Thanks

Susan

 

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Up scope....

......looks around.  What's going on folks?

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Posts: 1203
Perhaps it may be tempting

Perhaps it may be tempting to want CM to cover other important issues that some of us feel strongly about, if for no other reason because he's shown his effectiveness as a communicator in the Crash Course and his interviews and speaking engagements.  One of my own big concerns is the growing and entrenched systemic corruption and progression towards a police state in the US and other nations, and I admit I'd like to see CM really take on that subject.  But when it comes right down to it his opinions and/or choice of focus should be his own and not mine, and whether he also feels strongly about this issue (or the climate change issue, or global agendas, or certain political movements etc. etc.) or not I think he's probably making a good choice in keeping a more narrow focus.  There is no shortage of people and platforms speaking out on these other issues, after all.... this is not the only game in town.

Secondly , there is always that human habit of wanting to see leaders mirror all our priorities and concerns, and while that desire is understandable it is also unrealistic.  Plus that mentality tends to create the crap-tacular leadership we currently see in the larger democracies, where most of the "leadership" we get consists of empty suits (or sociopaths) whose only real talent is telling people what they want to hear.  It'd be a real shame to ruin the few real leaders left by demanding they cater to all our views and opinions.  And IF one truly feels strongly enough about the issues that CM doesn't take a strong public stance on, well then he isn't the leader for you.... time to find someone else who better represents you, or better yet become that leader you are looking for.  But as for me, as long as CM or Joel Salatin or Damon Vrabel or Judge Napolitano or Ron Paul or any other real leader out there isn't working at cross-purposes with my own goals, I'm happy to support them even if they don't have all the same priorities as myself.  I only wish my effectiveness as a leader or as an example to follow was anywhere close to that of those folks, so quite frankly I'm happy they're around...

- Nick

RJE's picture
RJE
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 31 2008
Posts: 1369
Mark, you misunderstood...

....Remember, I am not the information/disinformation problem here. The powers that be took the climate change issue off the table not me. My point to Tony was, if he wants his (our) message heard, he can't shut down his audience because of his obvious bias, and prejudice towards others that just may help. I hope this makes sense to you also.

I never implied or said what you are saying Mark. In fairness to me you have to re-read what I said, and if it still reads as you think it does then I have no idea how to change that.

It doesn't matter Mark if we are totally right about climate change. The politics have swayed absolute science with an alternative point of view, unfortubately. Climate change is now left for sustained, and tragic events where powerful people move the issue forward again. It may take the Earth cracking in half I'm affraid. 

I am a firm believer that global warming is ongoing, and pervasive. However, the reality is the climate change issue is dead until it's not. It's a political reality not mine. I will still be an advocate but time is short. Time to go to plan B. The Kyoto conference has long past its targeted audience. We lost because of a bogus smear campaign. Agreed?

So, our motivation is less CO2, YES? If so, then solar, wind, and wasted energy is best served with a commercial sized battery storage system. Right? If you agreed, then we have our foundation in which to build on. Right now this technology is the only real stumbling block to a future that we can touch, feel, and build on. What is so appealing is how it would blend so seamlessly into our complex system. It's beautiful Man. Right now that future is still fossil fuels, and it's finite! YIKES!!! Tic-Toc...Tic-Toc...Climate change is the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, or actually the act of not putting anymore into the atmosphere, and is why a prize of 1 billion dollars for a commercial size battery storage system is the best path forward. True?

Mark, I believe if you re-read my thread you will see this was the message all along. I was supposing if this happened then that would happen or could happen. My intentions were to be direct, and helpful. If I'm abrasive, I want to be called out, I do. If I wasn't or my words were misunderstood then clarity is in order. Hopefully you get clarity from my counter to your thread to me.

Mark, how is it logical for me to be a strong advocate of battery technology, and yet have (lost) faith in science. That is unfortunately your stretch on my words, and frankly is unfair. You can't say to me that I am forward looking, and then suggest I have lost faith in science. I was creating a hypothetical example to Tony, for his benefit. Tony doesn't have to sell me on climate change but maybe some American reader needs to hear the message on climate change but for Tony's bias that person tunes him out , and heads for the Internet. He doesn't know what to think. The smear campaign has made him indifferent as he researches. Yes?  Again, you have to re-read my thread, and if you come to this conclusion again, then I don't know how to change that. 

If you seen the steps taken in my life towards being a part of the solution, and not the problem then the benefit of the doubt would be established. I am not defending myself at all, but you did misunderstand, and acknowledgement of this would be appreciated. Regards

BOB 

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Well, no..............
robert essian wrote:

So, our motivation is less CO2, YES? If so, then solar, wind, and wasted energy is best served with a commercial sized battery storage system. Right? If you agreed, then we have our foundation in which to build on. Right now this technology is the only real stumbling block to a future that we can touch, feel, and build on. What is so appealing is how it would blend so seamlessly into our complex system. It's beautiful Man. Right now that future is still fossil fuels, and it's finite! YIKES!!! Tic-Toc...Tic-Toc...Climate change is the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, or actually the act of not putting anymore into the atmosphere, and is why a prize of 1 billion dollars for a commercial size battery storage system is the best path forward. True?

I beg to differ.  If we want less CO2, then the ONLY answer is living more simply so we may simply live.

Deploying huge numbers of renewables, and yes, your storage batteries, is simply more consumption, all of which will be fossil fuel driven (and the odd nuke).

I've proven beyond any doubt that it is possible to lead a perfectly "normal life" on a tiny percentage of the average energy consumption.

http://damnthematrix.wordpress.com/2011/09/04/the-power-of-energy-effici...

Replacing the current system, in its current gargantuan size, will only seal the fate of the planet's climate.  It would also mean ending doing EVERYTHING ELSE (building anything requiring concrete steel and copper among many other resources..)

I think people who promote the idea of simply changing over from this Matrix to a Renewables powered one have no idea of the size of the task at hand...  I also recommend reading http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/2011/10/the-energy-trap/ and everything else Tom Murphy, a PhD in Physics, has written on his brilliant blog.....

Mike

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