Blog

Romolo Tavani/Shutterstock

Are You Infuriated Yet?

You should be. I certainly am...
Friday, October 20, 2017, 7:27 PM

More and more, I'm encountering people who are simply infuriated with how our "leaders" are running (or to put it more accurately, ruining) things right now. And I share that fury.

It’s perfectly normal human response to be infuriated when an outside agent hurts you, especially if the pain seems unnecessary, illogical or random.

Imagine if your neighbor enjoyed setting off loud explosives at all hours of the day and night. Or if he had a habit of tailgating and brake-checking you every time he saw your car on the road. You’d been well within your rights to be infuriated.

Or to use a much more common example from the real world : When your politicians repeatedly pass laws that hurt you in favor of large corporations -- that, too, is infuriating. Especially if those actions run directly counter to their campaign promises.

There’s a lot of be infuriated about in the world today, so go ahead and embrace your rage. By doing so, you’ll be in a better mindset to understand things like Brexit, Catalonia, and Trump, each of which is a reflection of the fury of your fellow citizens, who are finally waking up to the fact that they've been victims for too long.

An easy prediction to make is that this simmering anger of the populace is going to start boiling over more violently in the coming years. Welcome to the Age of Fury.

'Over The Top' Dumb

Do you ever get the sense that, as a society, we're being dangerously reckless? Perhaps so dumb that we might not recover from the repercussions of our stupidity for many generations, if ever?

There are economic and financial idiocies in motion that are, by themselves, unsolvable predicaments without a peaceful solution. But when combined with resource depletion and declining net energy, they're positively intractable.

Take for example the hundreds of trillions of dollars-worth of underfunded entitlement and pension promises. Those promises cannot be kept and they cannot be paid. Everybody with a basic comprehension of math can conclude as such.

Yet we continue to operate as if the opposite were true. We comfort ourselves that, somehow, all the promised future payouts will be made in full -- even though the funds are insolvent, their returns are much lower than the actuarial projections require, and payout demand mercilessly rises each year.

Spoiler alert: This isn’t some future disaster lying in wait. It’s unfolding right now.

Take these headlines spanning the past several years:

When it comes to broken retirement promises, the future is now. It will be with us for a very long time.

Why? Because the math simply doesn’t work. It’s broken, it’s been broken for a long time. You can't put too little in the piggy bank at the start, then raid it over time, and still expect to have enough at the end.

And yet we, as a society, have preferred to pretend as if that weren’t the case. Which, it turns out, was a terrible “strategy.”

But if you think that's bad, you’re going to positively hate this chart:

S&P 500 chart

The pension liabilities now blowing up are contained within the thin green smear in the middle of this chart. Think on the nation's inability to handle that single crisis, and now reflect on how overwhelmed it's going to be by the far larger predicaments that lie elsewhere on the chart.

The Infuriating Plunder-fest That Is Health Care

The Medicare liabilities (the orange and largest band on the above chart) are immense, and will only become more so as our largest demographic, the baby boomers, further ages. But they become especially infuriating when seen in the larger context of the racketeering that drives the health care system in the United States.

Instead of doing anything constructive about the high number of IOUs building up within Medicare, Washington DC politicians are sidestepping the most obvious elements that contribute the most to the problem. Enormously wasteful, the “healthcare” system is entirely out of control and spiraling deeper into an abyss that threatens to literally destroy the most productive segment of the US social structure: the middle and upper middle classes.

That should be a topic of serious discussion in the halls of power. But none is being had.

Literally each day brings worse news on the skyrocketing costs of healthcare. But, as with most topics,  the media mostly focuses on the symptoms (prices) rather than the causes of the issue.

The real culprits here are the insurance cartel and a hospital system that has the most unfair, incomprehensible, and inhumane billing process ever devised. One easy to grasp feature of both the insurance companies and conspire to pay the executives far more than they actually deserve or are truly worth.

Health care premiums for 2018 set to go up by as much as 50 percent

Oct 5, 2017

Several states have announced rates for health insurance premiums on the Obamacare exchanges for 2018. Topping the list is Georgia, with rates that are 57 percent higher than last year, while Florida said some premiums will be 45 percent higher.

Among the reasons for these increases is the uncertainty about the future of the Affordable Care Act. President Donald Trump has vowed to repeal and replace the health care law, which was passed under his predecessor President Barack Obama.

Insurers are raising premiums in the face of repeated threats from President Trump to stop funding so-called cost-sharing reductions, payments to insurers that cover out-of-pocket costs for some low-income consumers. Trump previously referred to these payments as “bailouts” for insurance companies and threatened to stop making the payments so as to “let Obamacare implode”.

(Source)

That’s the story the health insurers are going with: they have to raise rates because they're uncertain whether they will get AS MUCH LOOT under the new rules being considered as they did under the utterly disastrous Obamacare provisions.

How much loot are we talking about? Look at this chart of the stock price of United Healthcare (UNH) since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare):

S&P 500 chart

If this chart showing massive near-4x gains in just 5 years, coupled with your steep annual premium increases, doesn’t infuriate you, you are just not getting it.

Even if your employer pays for your health care (somewhat obscuring the true impact of premium increases), the cost to you is fewer and lower pay increases, as well as steady yearly reductions in covered services along with higher co-pays and deductible amounts.

Still not infuriated? Ok, maybe this will do the trick. Here how much executive compensation at the major insurers was last year:

S&P 500 chart

(Source)

The average family health care insurance premium in 2016 was $18,764, meaning that Mark Bertolini from Aetna alone required 100% of the premiums from more than 2,200 families just to pay him in 2016. Of course, the “C-suite” of these health care insurers are loaded with other high-paid parasites who are just as busy gouging the young and old alike.

This is a complete travesty and joke. Congress and the Senate, sitting on their deservedly low approval ratings, pretend they cannot do anything about it. Too complicated they say. Bullshit I say. Go after the obscene pay packages and profits of the insurance industry as a first matter of business. Then make it a crime for hospitals to bill people differently for the exact same services.

That’s a no-brainer. Can you imagine if your mechanic had a secret pricing formula for every customer that was, literally, based on their maximum ability to pay? Nobody would stand for it, it’s disgusting that we tolerate this when it comes to something as vital and necessary as our health and even lives.

Fury, not tolerance, is what's needed now.

Conclusion (to Part 1)

The future has arrived. The pension losses are here and just getting started and the future will have a lot more of those sorts of broken promises.

The health care insurance crisis has been with us for 20 years or so now and Obamacare just put some extra accelerant on that fire, which is now consuming middle class households by the tens of thousands.

Both the pension and health care crises are infuriating and self-inflicted wounds. We could have avoided them by making wiser choices in the past. We didn't. We could limit their damage by making better choices today. We almost assuredly won't.

Current conversations and proposals are thinly disguised sleight-of-hand movements whose purpose is to deflect attention from the thefts underway. Anybody who studies the system and its math comes to the same conclusion: the corporations have all the power and they are misusing it for private gain.

Why there aren’t more politicians willing to call a spade a spade and actually protect their constituents is a real mystery. But the next wave of populist candidates certainly won’t be. People are sick and tired of being asked to give more and more while corporations and wealthy elites keep taking more and more.

It’s simply infuriating.

But that’s not the worst of it. The mistakes we are making right now in terms of energy policy and ecological destruction are far more dangerous to your personal health, liberty and future prospects than a simple market crash.

In Part 2: It's Time For Action, we uncover the hidden downside risks in today's financial markets and explain how, as destructive as a coming market crash will be, the longer-term damage to society and risks to your well-being are rooted in the potential breakdown of the systems we depend on to live.

As with pensions and health care, we are pursuing similar dangerously misguided policies in our farming & food systems, extraction of industrial resources, and ecological management -- to name just a few. 

There's an appropriate time for fury. And that time is now -- provided we use the anger to spur us into constructive action. Get your fury on.

Click here to read Part 2 of this report (free executive summary, enrollment required for full access)

Endorsed Financial Adviser Endorsed Financial Adviser

Looking for a financial adviser who sees the world through a similar lens as we do? Free consultation available.

Learn More »
Read Our New Book "Prosper!"Read Our New Book

Prosper! is a "how to" guide for living well no matter what the future brings.

Learn More »

 

Related content

63 Comments

Stabu's picture
Stabu
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 7 2011
Posts: 88
Furious from 2014, Depressed as of Late

I've been furious for so long already that I'm worn out of being angry. While I'm concerned about a huge swath of things including unfunded entitlements, increasing healthcare expenditures, possible nuclear war with North Korea, disappearing insects, approaching peak oil etc. what infuriates me the most is this relentless money printing conducted by virtually all central banks world over. No matter the asset class everything imaginable - except those few things deliberately manipulated downwards - is going to the moon, regardless of how crazy or overvalued. Since I started investing right after the original Nasdaq bubble, I used to make a comfortable 30% per year in the markets until I finally threw in the towel in 2011. I haven't touched stocks or virtually any other investable assets since then. Nothing makes sense to me except through this stupid lens of endless money printing. These days I put all my extra money into paying down my mortgage (I don't have other debt), buying short-term US bonds, and investing in small shares of selected local businesses. The reason, I think, I'm feeling depressed is both because of missing out on all these insane gains since 2011, and because I'm starting to seriously doubt my own skill and intellect. What if this thing just goes on forever and never ends? So what if they add 10%, 20% or 50% more money into the money supply every year - what if this just increases asset prices by a similar amount and nothing else is ever affected by this?

LesPhelps's picture
LesPhelps
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 30 2009
Posts: 716
What Stabu said!

I've gone from angry to numb and depressed.

The insanity has been going on for decades and it only seems to become more absurd.

Talk about fake news.  When the MSM talkes about it, they are talking about a specific piece of news.

What's false is the universal lack of focus on issues of crucial global importance.  We are feed endless daily articles on "news" such as Weinstein and virtually nothing on the global flying insect collapse.  Global flying insect populations are down 75% in 27 years and we are supposed to consider Weinstein's behavior to be more news worthy?  It's simply insane.

Time2help's picture
Time2help
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 9 2011
Posts: 2718
This might help (infuriate you).

Here's the Dickinson, Tx website.

http://www.ci.dickinson.tx.us/627/Hurricane-Harvey-Information

Here's the grant request form/contract (while it's still up).

http://www.ci.dickinson.tx.us/DocumentCenter/View/2016

Grover's picture
Grover
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 16 2011
Posts: 761
Beyond Fury

Well said, Stabu! I'm also in the "worn out" category. I know that I can only vote against 3 members of CONgress - 2 Senators and 1 Representative. Unfortunately, many in my State think these 3 people are doing great things for the State by bringing federal dollars home to do needed projects. I'm sure it is the same way in the other 49 States. When you add it all up, all 50 States are feeling that they're getting more from the federal coffers than they are contributing in taxes. That's why we have the federal debt. That's why we have underfunded pensions. That's why SS and Medicare are such a mess. No politician ever got reelected by proposing severe austerity. That's what it would take to get the finances in order. It ain't gonna happen. The system is doomed - eventually.

I still vote, but only to remove the incumbents. It's not that I expect the person who receives my vote to do a good job. The system is too ingrained for a newcomer to fix. Reelection is always on a politician's mind. They need campaign money for their reelection bid. The lobbyists offer great incentives and only ask for a teeny weeny loophole for the clients. Multiply that a few million times and we get the spaghetti legislation we get. Why should we be surprised?

It is best to focus on what is best for your loved ones and your eventual community. Figure out where it would be best to be while the system is intact and also when the system collapses. That advice varies for each of us. What is best for me may not suit your needs. If there isn't enough local food and water available to the local populace, there will be huge problems when the system fails. Ask yourself what will happen when the trucks stop delivering goods to the stores? It won't matter what causes the stoppage. People will help strangers only if the problem is perceived to be temporary - a hurricane, flood, fire, earthquake, etc. As soon as the problem appears to be permanent, attitudes will change drastically. Cooperation works best when bellies are reasonably full and hydrated.

Grover

paulanders's picture
paulanders
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 5
Why be infuriated?

I honestly do see your side of the coin, and yes, there are a boatload of people that will be screwed out of their pensions in the end. But there's a flip side to the coin. I am in no way condoning what they do but really, why not take advantage of the never ending inflating that's going on, because one day, it truly does have to end. Ride that market higher, ride that Bitcoin higher, keep stacking that cheap silver, hell,  ride all of it higher while you can and reap the free money they are giving away.

Sitting around worrying about it will only put you further behind the curve...

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 7 2007
Posts: 5438
Because...here's why.
paulanders wrote:

I honestly do see your side of the coin, and yes, there are a boatload of people that will be screwed out of their pensions in the end. But there's a flip side to the coin. I am in no way condoning what they do but really, why not take advantage of the never ending inflating that's going on, because one day, it truly does have to end. Ride that market higher, ride that Bitcoin higher, keep stacking that cheap silver, hell,  ride all of it higher while you can and reap the free money they are giving away.

Sitting around worrying about it will only put you further behind the curve...

Why become infuriated?  Because along the way we are doing irreversible damage to the world's ecosystems and our future prospects.  If we don't activate and change that trajectory, and console ourselves with Bitcoin gains and stock market returns, then we'll be majorly disappointed with what comes to pass.

Now if said emotions are not rocket fuel for positive change, then by all means don't go there.

Or, if you can achieve that same change while in a happy-go-lucky state, that seems better as well.

But for most people nothing changes until we first confront the issue and go through the usual process of emotional adjustment.  Why?  because decisions and actions remain rooted in our emotional centers (the Amygdala), not our rational cortical areas.

Biology still rules.

As I noted in part II of this report, the flying insects in Germany have been recorded as declining by nearly 80% over the past 25 years.  That really ought to worry the bejeezus out of everyone.

I'm not sure that saying we should just sit back and enjoy the (illusory) gains offered by thin-air money printing while they last is really the best course of action here.  We need to change the story and we need to do it really quickly.  So the real question for me isn't should we be infuriated or Zen-like, but what's the best way to get people to (finally) pay attention to what really matters?

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 7 2007
Posts: 5438
I'll go on
Stabu wrote:

I've been furious for so long already that I'm worn out of being angry. 

Yep.  I share that with you, along with a lot of other people.

This has gone on so long that I have to wonder if they cannot keep doing this right up too the moment that it all is simply inescapably ruined.

Their tactics involve complete control of the financial "markets" and distractive propaganda beamed at the populace 24/7.  Its really hard to get people to focus on the important things via social media because that route supports a short attention span, twitchy reactivity, and is heavily infested with bots, unaware individuals, corporate shills,and government agents posing as ordinary people ready to deflect any real conversations straight into the nearest ditch.

So it feels like there's no positive movement.  But there really is.  As the person holding the center of this site I am as weary as anybody, but I've got to keep going to see this through to the end, whatever that is.  

The podcast with Stephen Jenkinson had a powerful moment for me when he said this:

Samuel Beckett, great Irish writer. He has a book title. And the book title says what you and I are talking about right now. The name of the book is, I can’t go on, I’ll go on.  Now, if you do not pay attention to how he has phrased it, you think what he is saying is I cannot go on; I can go on. But he doesn’t say that. See, that is hopeful and hopeless again. He says I cannot go on; I will go on. And at the risk of cheapening an elaborate and well accomplished book just by making a phrase of the title, I believe his title says this:

I have an obligation in a troubled time to go on, not being able to.

If you let that stand and you do not try to resolve that, and you recognize the inability to go on is no more predicting of the outcome than the ability to go on is. Neither one of these foreclose on what may yet come to pass. However, the depths of the trouble mean that there is such thing... there is such a thing as not being able to go on and you turn away from that at your peril. The recognition that you cannot go on is a real time in people’s lives. It is not a failure, moral or otherwise, it is not a collapse.

It is a true thing, and it takes courage to know that you are at a time when you cannot go on. And what Beckett is saying is, there come times in our lives when we go on not being able to. Where you are not obliged to choose between those two realities that both of them are your companions now; and I think the degree of trouble that we are seeing beginning to crest now, requires both of those skills. The skill of not being able to go on and the skill of doing so at the same time and not being obliged to choose between them. And pretending that because you read or watched Bucket List enough times, you know how to get on the other side of being defeated.

There is nothing on the other side of being defeated. When you lose, you lose. And what we have done to that which has sustained us, we’ve done it long enough now, that the losing has begun. That is a nonnegotiable situation. You can have as many politicians as you want try to get your vote from you by claiming they are going to make something great again. But there is no again to go back to, you see. That is what grownups know about a troubled time and that is... there is a degree of courage in that absolutely, but it is a courage that has no promise in it. That if you are courageous secretly, it is going to be okay.

(Source

So I'll go on.

ezlxq1949's picture
ezlxq1949
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 29 2009
Posts: 166
How to wake them up?

Chris asked,

what's the best way to get people to (finally) pay attention to what really matters?

I ask myself this same question many times a day. My stock answer is that nobody will do anything serious until something breaks, but by then it'll be too late to do anything useful.

I am not alone in this glum opinion.

Some people complain about the lumpenproletariat and why must they be so lumpen, but it's not them: it's far more the lumpeneconomists and their acolytes, the lumpenpoliticians, who together are wilfully blind.

(You MUST read the book of the same name by Margaret Heffernan; your education is incomplete until you do. Astonishing case studies of the emotional inability of highly-placed people to recognise and adjust to reality.)

kaimu's picture
kaimu
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 20 2013
Posts: 158
DEBT IS DEBT

Aloha! I understand central bank debt but debt is debt. Debt has been part of the American Empire on all levels. You want to buy a house then get into debt. You want a credit card then get into debt. You want a masters degree then go into debt.

Are central banks a reflection of society or is society a reflection of central banks?

The American Dream is a dream made on debt!

Condemning central banks? Look in the mirror!

 

gkcjrrt's picture
gkcjrrt
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 20 2016
Posts: 10
Mendacity

What gets me the most angry is the institutional lying that is going on - and no one, well almost no one save a few, either point it out or object.

Look at this from the Wall Street Journal - does anything seem amiss, like the actual PE of the Russell 2000 and its estimated PE.  The people paying attention do not object b/c they get rich by the system - justice and fairness be damned ... the love of money is the root  of the lies.   I fear I have become a misanthrope over the past decade

 

 

paulanders's picture
paulanders
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 5
Chris, that is where you have

Chris, that is where you have it and I think me wrong. WE are not doing irreversible damage, THEY are doing the irreversible damage. GMO foods, vaccinations, insecticides (straight up poisons on your food), the list is long and will not stop at this point. I truly believe we are past the point of no return on this one so while it sounds like I don't care, I do, it's just that you might as well do what you can while you can. You of all people knows how the system works. It doesn't change because it's not right, or not working. First it has to bankrupt us, then fail us miserably, then fall off a cliff, and then lay there and smolder before somebody even mentions that maybe we should try another way (think Obozo care).  All I'm saying is chances are a person will not have this opportunity again in their lifetime to make this money. Money that they will need no matter what the future brings us. 

Keep up the good work, I do enjoy it!

Mazman's picture
Mazman
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 20 2017
Posts: 1
Developing

I tried joining the cohort of small scale developers with the idea that we could build small infill projects, right after I got out of college. I wanted to build rentals and other housing that was at least affordable to the middle class. It's not really possible in the cities that are 'booming' or seems insanely risky at this point. The instability of real estate in the last 20 years is crushing.

http://www.multpl.com/case-shiller-home-price-index-inflation-adjusted/

If this posts correctly, you can see we haven't reached the insanity of 2005 when adjusted for inflation. Prices seem to be accelerating though and we'll be back at crazy town in a year and half at the current rate.

It feels like the whole real estate industry has lost their minds.

Stabu's picture
Stabu
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 7 2011
Posts: 88
Cryptos and the Stock Market

I actually own a few Bitcoin that I got for about $10 end of 2012. I accepted those reluctantly as a form of payment for minor debt. I've actively followed the crypto currency market since, but never purchased more, because the market has always felt overvalued. Fundamentally I object the anti-social way most cryptos are designed that majorly benefits early adopters. I also suspect that cryptos themselves will be less successful in the long-run for a number of reasons including a relatively slow adoption rate compared to other recent phenomenon such as the rise of Facebook. While crypto networks are pretty much undefeatable, cryptos come with other downsides, primarily the need to convert them into real money (e.g. dollars or pounds). If governments want to ban these things the only thing they have to do is to shut down a handful of exchanges. Pure information businesses with online only presence can work fine with cryptos, but businesses in the real world operate with supply chains that rely on real money in the end. Government fiat is still fundamentally based on the government's assets, most significantly its ability to tax, while the value of cryptos is almost entirely based on the size of the crypto network. If cryptos catch on in a major way I suspect that they will be banned due to similar reasons authorities are waging a war on cash and on gold, and the reasons for banning cryptos are even stronger than for cash or gold, since conducting illegal activities with cryptos is far easier. My speculation is that the main reason this hasn't happened yet is because governments would want to form their own cryptos in order to virtually seal their destruction of human liberty. All this being said, I'm bullish on the blockchain technology with it's abilities for e.g. triple bookkeeping, but I believe it's future is in private rather than public ledgers.

The problem with the stock market is that the PE valuations are simply insanely high and those valuations have gone up for quite a long time. Stock markets around the world are trading more in unison than ever before and hence it's almost pointless to try to do any international diversification. I've found several natural resource companies, a few utilities, and a few consumer staples businesses that have fair valuation. The reason I'm not investing in them is because they are still part of a stock market and if any form of accident would ever occur, we could see these fair valuations to still halve overnight. The difference between a stock that's lost 80% and a stock that's lost 90% of it's value is that the stock that's lost 90% first lost 80% and then an additional 50% of it's value. Therefore the only "safe" investments are small privately held businesses you can physically visit that have solid foundations and very few connections with anything financial (debt included).

So why not simply ride the stock market and cryptos higher? Well, even if we assume that this thing will go on forever, let's say, doubling every single year starting 2018, continuing on 2019, then 2020 etc. etc. without a single crash, sooner or later - to Chris' point - the financial markets will uncouple from reality. The longer this goes on and the more insane all valuations become, the larger and faster the uncoupling will likely be. I would not be surprised - but I would be very socked - if I woke up tomorrow to find out that land and every item in the grocery store cost 10 times as much as it did the night before. I'm not even sure if such a single uncoupling event could be characterized as a hyperinflation, since the revaluation happened literarily overnight and become to a halt soon thereafter. The process is fairly similar to what would happen when a country with fixed exchange rates suddenly decides to devalue the fixed exchange rate by, in this case, 90%.

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 7 2007
Posts: 5438
Buried in cucumbers...

Cases like this one are easy to find.  

In the middle of the night in March of 2012, NYPD officers burst into the Bronx home of Gerald Bryan, ransacking his belongings, tearing out light fixtures, punching through walls, and confiscating $4,800 in cash.

Bryan, 42, was taken into custody on suspected felony drug distribution, as the police continued their warrantless search. Over a year later, Bryan's case was dropped. When he went to retrieve his $4,800, he was told it was too late: the money had been deposited into the NYPD's pension fund.

(Source)

And then the big boyz and girlz get off scott-free on major felonies while Goldman Sachs gets 100 cents on the dollar for blown CDOs that they themselves wrote and sold.

These things matter...

AKGrannyWGrit's picture
AKGrannyWGrit
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2011
Posts: 391
Chris - Daring Greatly

Thank you to ezlxq1949 for mentioning Margaret Heffernan!  I dedicate her video below to Chris who is daring greatly by asking questions and pointing out the silence.

AKGrannyWGrit

Rodster's picture
Rodster
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 22 2016
Posts: 11
More Bad News !

"Ecological Armageddon"

https://www.rt.com/news/407215-insect-population-decline-study/

 

Side note: I live in sunny/humid SW Florida and I can recall twice a year when "lovebugs" would make their appearance and you knew it because driving anywhere would result in a dirty windshield within minutes. I haven't seen lovebugs in the last 5 years and that goes for butterflies. We have royally screwed up this planet and Elon Musk wants us to inhabit Mars? I say we first learn how to take care of our own planet before we screw another one up.

Uncletommy's picture
Uncletommy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: May 3 2014
Posts: 425
In·fu·ri·ate

Seems somewhat appropriate, given our current global situation, not to mention the NYPD:

"a spirit of punishment, often represented as one of three goddesses who executed the curses pronounced upon criminals, tortured the guilty with stings of conscience, and inflicted famines and pestilences. The Furies were identified at an early date with the Eumenides.

charleshughsmith's picture
charleshughsmith
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 15 2010
Posts: 646
worshiping TINA

At some point the whole perverse charade becomes a tragi-comedy.  So now China's government (via local governments tapping the infinite-credit machine of the central govt) is buying 24% of all those overpriced empty flats that constitute "the China miracle":

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-10-21/unprecedented-housing-bailout-revealed-china-property-sales-drop-first-time-30-month
China's Government Is Expected To Buy 24% Of All Residential Real Estate For Sale In 2017
 
In the current Mode of Production, TINA (there is no alternative) rules.
As I've noted many times: if you don't change the way "money" is created and distributed, you change nothing. 
agitating prop's picture
agitating prop
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: May 28 2009
Posts: 846
White people are the new Black people

The treatment white people are getting now has been going on for ages in the black community. Systemic corruption is very hard to control once it is firmly embedded, particularly if there is a profit motive. The idiot msm plays a role here too.  

I read an interesting story about the numbers around police apprehension of drug offenders in B.C a couple of years ago.  (Vancouver is now one of the politically dirtiest cities in N.America, due to Asian criminals laundering money through casinos and then through real estate)

 

The story, appearing in the Vancouver Sun, was about how the volume of drugs seized by police had surged and was at historical highs. The reporter followed this up with words to the effect, "what nobody can figure out is how drug seizures have doubled while the amount of cash seized during these arrests is half what it used to be."  

Anybody who knows anything about cities that are propped up by drug revenues, understands every level of govt and law enforcement are involved to some degree.  When police seize drugs, they seize cash too, and keep it themselves. How hard is it to put 2 and 2 together? 

Recently, it was discovered that B.C's fentanyl can be traced directly to China.  Moreover, the money made from the drugs has been laundered through casinos and then ends up purchasing homes. This along with the Air B and B disaster places Vancouverites on the street, living in their cars and pushed out to the boonies where they live in tinder dry areas and cook food over campfires --  hugely risky  

The media have finally started to report these disasters  and not because they are having a twinge of conscience, but because print media is dying and nobody reads them anymore UNLESS they are relevant. While these problems were building, they ignored them, preferring their fish wrap to make money from their corporate real estate developer advertisers.  

The U.S is a vast criminal enterprise and Canada is right behind you. 

Enraged? I was for a time.  Now I am trying to put as much distance as I can between myself and evil and stupidity. That takes a certain measure of calm.  

agitating prop's picture
agitating prop
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: May 28 2009
Posts: 846
Stabu

Stabu,

There is nothing wrong with your intellect and reasoning skill. The problem is govt interference in the markets, which is clearly a form of soft Fascism, or a corporatocracy.  It is pretty hard to predict what is going to happen when you have this form of partnership. What can't be gleaned from the surface is stealth movement beneath the surface  

 

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2210
agitating prop
agitating prop wrote:

Enraged? I was for a time.  Now I am trying to put as much distance as I can between myself and evil and stupidity. That takes a certain measure of calm.  

This.  Rage takes too much energy and paralyzes the higher thinking centers.  Rage is useful, or can be.  But not a sustainable or intelligent long-term strategy, IMO.

A metaphor:  if, say, one was chained to a wall in a dungeon, rage-given strength might help one pull those chains free from the wall.  But to actually escape the dungeon (avoiding guards, picking locks or figuring out how to climb out a window), a calm and quiet mind is a must.

agitating prop's picture
agitating prop
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: May 28 2009
Posts: 846
Environment versus humanity

One of the problems I am currently studying and developing a work around for is one that will affect me directly.  I live in a place that is SO pro-environment, it is strangling the community. There is nowhere for anybody in the service community to live and affordable housing initiatives just can't get any traction.

The underlying but unstated goal is to turn the place back to a pristine Eden. In other words, the nimbys in control go beyond wanting the population to stabilize.  They want the population to shrink. 

How does one square an environmental conscience that is at odds with humanitarian values that include providing basic shelter for working class people?  

Some people here would embrace a tree and spit in the eye of someone forced to sleep in the street.

i understand it and I value the environment too, but what is making me angry these days, is I feel I am being forced to choose between people and nature.  And I think many people are feeling the same way, so the never ending barrage of info about our degrading environment places them in an awkward position with regards their human values.  So they, unfortunately, give up  

 

skipr's picture
skipr
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 9 2016
Posts: 81
decisions decisions

Don't worry, the collapsing ecosphere will eventually decide for you.  The rapidly collapsing economy will be the good old days in comparison.

Edward Abbey said it perfectly:  "Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell."

What blows my mind is how this society of ours has defined reality (food, water, air, all species) an abstraction (externalities, etc) and abstractions (money, economy, etc) a reality.

thc0655's picture
thc0655
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 27 2010
Posts: 1467
But we can always hope

...that a really thorough, foundation-rattling economic collapse will at least stop us in our tracks enough (resource depletion, etc) to give Nature a chance to recover for a few decades while we lick our wounds.

Time2help's picture
Time2help
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 9 2011
Posts: 2718
There will come a day

"When we raise our true flag"

"There will come a day
(and it won’t be long now)
when the mandible-mouthed liars cease their death song,
and ivy grows over the bunkers of the Bank Boys,
and the cannons all sprout mushrooms,
and fireflies fill the air once more.

When that day comes,
we will lower the flag of the marching machine
(once used as wrapping paper for dead teenagers with rifles,
once hung over buildings full of men with red eyes,
once emblazoned upon flying robots that rained fire),
and we will raise our true flag at long last.

It will be woven from the prayers of our grandmothers
who will never see it raised but knew one day it would be.
It will be dyed in the blood of the media martyrs
who stared the Bastards in the eye and sang life songs.
It will have a traditional image of Michael the Archangel,
except instead of him stepping on the Devil
they are laughing together over a drink at the pub
while a man with a pipe looks on and smiles.
It will be based on a drawing made in crayon long ago
by a chain-smoking dryad who lurks in your brain pan.

We will all salute it in our own unique way:
with fart jokes and whale songs,
with unearthly ululations,
with runed glossolalia,
with lightning from our fingertips,
with air guitar karate,
with lava dance lovemaking,
with a single tear from someone who still misses you,
with an uplifting of the heart toward the sky.

And then we’ll all curl up together
and we’ll sleep unafraid
for the very first time,
and we will dream of the ones
who helped walk us home."

- Caitlin Johnstone

dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 184
If I were a dog

I'd curse the day the alpha male approached their fire pits

I wonder what they tell the other animals

We just hang out

we're not their accomplice

Geedard's picture
Geedard
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 13 2014
Posts: 52
Dow - going exponential...?

Wow!!!  

1'000 point gains are accelerating hard. 

Only last week the DOW breaks 23'000 and in just a few trading days since, it's now at 23'440... 

Jeez... It's kinda shocking to witness, but also no great surprise. What a disconnect from reality... 

DennisC's picture
DennisC
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 19 2011
Posts: 226
If I Were a Dog

 

I would trot down this road sniffing
on one side and then the other
peeing a little here and there
wherever I felt the urge
having a good time what the hell
saving some because it's a long road

but since I'm not a dog
I walk straight down the road
trying to get home before dark

if I were a dog and I had a master
who beat me I would run away
and go hungry and sniff around
until I found a master who loved me
I could tell by his smell and I
would lick his face so he knew

or maybe it would be a woman
I would protect her we could go
everywhere together even down this
dark road and I wouldn't run from side
to side sniffing I would always
be protecting her and I would stop
to pee only once in awhile

sometimes in the afternoon we could
go to the park and she would throw
a stick I would bring it back to her

each time I put the stick at her feet
I would say this is my heart
and she would say I will make it fly
but you must bring it back to me
I would always bring it back to her
and to no other if I were a dog

If I Were a Dog - Richard Shelton (http://writersalmanac.publicradio.org/index.php?date=2013/07/11)

I would be this dog.

DennisC's picture
DennisC
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 19 2011
Posts: 226
Too Early or Too Late...

to order custom printed Dow 25,000 caps?

https://www.amazon.com/SW-IM-Baseball-Graphic-American/dp/B06XSJVX4V/ref...

Must be made in the USA right? It's got a flag on it.

 

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 7 2007
Posts: 5438
I'd be this dog

...jumped just a weeeeee bit too early:

https://i.imgur.com/5lBl5GH.gifv

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2210
Humanity is this dog?

Trying to outrun the converging predicaments we face?

 

https://i.imgur.com/wY5BZ.gif

dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 184
If I was a dog

I'd have these problems licked

alan2102's picture
alan2102
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 31 2013
Posts: 45
charleshughsmith wrote:At
charleshughsmith wrote:

At some point the whole perverse charade becomes a tragi-comedy.  So now China's government (via local governments tapping the infinite-credit machine of the central govt) is buying 24% of all those overpriced empty flats that constitute "the China miracle":

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-10-21/unprecedented-housing-bailout-revealed-china-property-sales-drop-first-time-30-month
China's Government Is Expected To Buy 24% Of All Residential Real Estate For Sale In 2017
 
C H Smith? THE C H Smith?  Hey, Brother! 
 
Surely you know better than to cite zerohedge for anything about China. They've been (like so many others) predicting China's inevitable (?) hard landing for  many years now, and of course they are always wrong. They've got a bug up their asses about China, and simply refuse to admit that the Chinese have found a better way to do things -- as they obviously have.
 
If you want some good briefings about China and its economy, check out Godfree Roberts:
 
http://www.inpraiseofchina.com/is-chinas-debt-exaggerated/
Is China's Debt Exaggerated?
May 29, 2017

https://www.unz.com/article/chinas-financial-debt-everything-you-know-is...
China's Financial Debt: Everything You Know Is Wrong
Godfree Roberts     July 5, 2017
 

Snydeman's picture
Snydeman
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 376
I sense

A shiv. Likely of the corporate variety.

Matt Holbert's picture
Matt Holbert
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 3 2008
Posts: 76
Thanks ezlxq1949...

I just picked up the book today from WSU-Spokane. The depressing reality is that the book has only been checked out twice. Both in the date of publication: 2011. As someone who has been infuriated for 20 plus years I look forward to reading the book. So far (p. 44) it has not disappointed.

Mohammed Mast's picture
Mohammed Mast
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: May 17 2017
Posts: 78
Sound Familiar?

"The next twenty years are going to be completely unlike the last twenty years"

Chris Martenson

So why be infuriated when the paradigm predicted is playing out as predicted?

Edwardelinski's picture
Edwardelinski
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 23 2012
Posts: 309
Chinas Red Flag

Since May Godfree may have missed the warning from Chinas own chief central banker,the IMF,The Bank for International Settlements,(the bankers bank)the Feds warning on the The Industrial Commercial Bank of China,S&P,Moody's and Fitch..

alan2102's picture
alan2102
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 31 2013
Posts: 45
Yes, their credit rating was

Yes, their credit rating was in free-fall there, alllllllll the way down from very very very very VERY good to very very very VERY good. Quite a collapse!  Same as their slowing GDP growth rate, from nose-bleed double-digit levels in 2004-2008 alllllllll the way down to a very robust (and much faster than OECD countries and world average) ~7% today.

This is the kind of "news" that died-in-the-wool doomers sometimes take as signifier of imminent collapse.    I am not saying you are one, Edward. But I am familiar with the general nature of argument. Anything even SLIGHTLY bad (or slightly not-so-good) that happens is taken to indicate imminent doom. After a few decades (my own period of observation), this style gets old.

Oh btw, Moody's recently downgraded a bunch of countries, including UK, South Africa and others. Credit ratings changes happen frequently. Especially small, trivial ones like the recent ones re China.

Oh btw II, Minsky Moments are not the end of the world. China might have an asset value collapse at some point. So what? There have been hundreds of such events in history. They  look terrible while in progress, but they are not the end of the world. Often, things are better after the resolve (cold shower effect) -- which is what we can expect from China, because of the high quality of their national management.

 

Snydeman's picture
Snydeman
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 376
Mohammed Mast wrote: "The
Mohammed Mast wrote:

"The next twenty years are going to be completely unlike the last twenty years"

Chris Martenson

So why be infuriated when the paradigm predicted is playing out as predicted?

Because many of us were hoping against all hope that raising the awareness of these issues might have led to some substantial dialogue about them, and possible action to stave off disaster. That is, hoping that pointing out how much different the next 20 years might be would cause more people to take steps to make the next 20 years a little less different. 

 

Alas.

Edwardelinski's picture
Edwardelinski
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 23 2012
Posts: 309
Please See

18 Trillion in corporate debt and shadow banking.The credit agencies are the fox-hen house scenarios..

Edwardelinski's picture
Edwardelinski
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 23 2012
Posts: 309
Please See

18 Trillion in corporate debt and shadow banking.The credit agencies are the fox-hen house scenarios..

Cornelius999's picture
Cornelius999
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 17 2008
Posts: 357
Feck it, it's Beckett.

Just a note. I also love the line " I can't go on. I'll go on " but Beckett doesn't have a book of that title though these words are from a larger piece of his work.  My take on Beckett is he's probably the ultimate pessimist and would probably say to us, were he still around, " I told you so! "

I recommend perhaps the most accomplished and entertaining biography on him " Samuel Beckett the Last Modernist " by that wonderful fellow Dublin writer Anthony Cronin. For me Cronin is the real star of the book in his efforts to describe Beckett and his world

Cornelius999's picture
Cornelius999
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 17 2008
Posts: 357
I have since cheered myself a

I have since cheered myself a little by the thought that it's still free to have a pee in my house - pending water-charges are in political suspension. Let us be grateful for small mercies. I can't remember if Beckett allowed small mercies; though severe I think he was an honourable and decent fellow.

alan2102's picture
alan2102
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 31 2013
Posts: 45
Edwardelinski wrote: 18
Edwardelinski wrote:

18 Trillion in corporate debt and shadow banking.The credit agencies are the fox-hen house scenarios..

Edward: suggest you go back and actually READ the articles I Iinked.

A couple snippets:

"China’s Debt is vastly over-exaggerated. China’s net debt to GDP is considerably lower than that of Japan, the U.K., France, USA, Korea and Australia, as this chart from former US Treasury official and World Bank country director for China and Russia, Yukon Huang, makes clearI referenced World Bank figures because the Bank is consistent in what it counts as ‘debt’ when comparing countries. The World Bank is forced – by virtue of its charter and its staffing – to be relatively neutral and it has direct, collegial access to every member country’s books and has used the same formulae for decades to calculate national debt."

"China has NONE of the conditions that led to Japan’s debt buildup. China has $4 trillion in foreign reserves; $3 trillion in personal savings; close to zero net corporate debt and an economy growing 400% faster than ours. Their investment-dependent infrastructure is an asset that’s paying off handsomely and more than covering its costs. The Chinese economic model cleverly captures some of that payoff to retire the debt."

.........................

The very last point there, re infrastructure as asset, is extremely important and is not often mentioned in these discussions. Aside from $4 trillion in foreign reserves; $3 trillion in personal savings, close to zero net corporate debt, etc.,  they also have VAST ASSETS that their investments (note the distinction from mere spending) have bought. Most of these assets are actual current income-generating ones, though some of them are rainy-day assets (e.g. their probable ~30,000 tons of gold).   It is possible for two huge debt figures to be identical -- say, China vs. U.S. -- but there is a world of difference because in one case the party invested the money wisely in productive assets, and in the other case the party pissed-away the money on stupid consumption. I'm sure you can guess which is which.  (Right?)

another snippet, same article:

"Ultimately all growth is investment dependent. China’s investments are extremely profitable at present. The St Louis Federal Reserve estimates that the multiplier on Chinese government spending is two. In other words, the economy is creating surplus capital to replace that which is destroyed."

Snydeman's picture
Snydeman
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 376
alan2102
alan2102 wrote:
Edwardelinski wrote:

18 Trillion in corporate debt and shadow banking.The credit agencies are the fox-hen house scenarios..

Edward: suggest you go back and actually READ the articles I Iinked.

A couple snippets:

"China’s Debt is vastly over-exaggerated. China’s net debt to GDP is considerably lower than that of Japan, the U.K., France, USA, Korea and Australia, as this chart from former US Treasury official and World Bank country director for China and Russia, Yukon Huang, makes clearI referenced World Bank figures because the Bank is consistent in what it counts as ‘debt’ when comparing countries. The World Bank is forced – by virtue of its charter and its staffing – to be relatively neutral and it has direct, collegial access to every member country’s books and has used the same formulae for decades to calculate national debt."

"China has NONE of the conditions that led to Japan’s debt buildup. China has $4 trillion in foreign reserves; $3 trillion in personal savings; close to zero net corporate debt and an economy growing 400% faster than ours. Their investment-dependent infrastructure is an asset that’s paying off handsomely and more than covering its costs. The Chinese economic model cleverly captures some of that payoff to retire the debt."

.........................

The very last point there, re infrastructure as asset, is extremely important and is not often mentioned in these discussions. Aside from $4 trillion in foreign reserves; $3 trillion in personal savings, close to zero net corporate debt, etc.,  they also have VAST ASSETS that their investments (note the distinction from mere spending) have bought. Most of these assets are actual current income-generating ones, though some of them are rainy-day assets (e.g. their probable ~30,000 tons of gold).   It is possible for two huge debt figures to be identical -- say, China vs. U.S. -- but there is a world of difference because in one case the party invested the money wisely in productive assets, and in the other case the party pissed-away the money on stupid consumption. I'm sure you can guess which is which.  (Right?)

another snippet, same article:

"Ultimately all growth is investment dependent. China’s investments are extremely profitable at present. The St Louis Federal Reserve estimates that the multiplier on Chinese government spending is two. In other words, the economy is creating surplus capital to replace that which is destroyed."

 

And how are those Chinese demographics looking? Fresh water availability? Pollution?

 

China has its own problems that will come to bite it on the ass, whether debt does or not.

Edwardelinski's picture
Edwardelinski
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 23 2012
Posts: 309
You are correct Snydeman

Our family became members a few years ago.My visits were to learn about the environment.I have a decent handle on the economy.Not having been in some time you reminded me of why we left.The thing is,I would have been the one to tell you when it was the time for your family to run to the bank....

alan2102's picture
alan2102
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 31 2013
Posts: 45
Snydeman wrote: And how are
Snydeman wrote:

And how are those Chinese demographics looking? Fresh water availability? Pollution?

China has its own problems that will come to bite it on the ass, whether debt does or not.

Demographics?  Looking pretty good, I would say, with a fertility rate of 1.5, far below replacement. Actually, if they have a demographic problem it is one of too-low fertility and a possible population bust later in the century (too small of a working age population relative to aged population).  But generally looking pretty good.

Water? Looking better and better as the South-to-North water diversion project continues. As you know, it is a 50-year project, which will eventually deliver ~45 billion cubic meters of water from the wet south to the dry north, annually.   It is not even half done, yet. But portions are in operation, and Beijing's water supply has improved dramatically, resulting in sharp reductions in groundwater drawdown and other favorable changes.  Much more to come, all in good time. It takes TIME to build effective, ultra-modern infrastructure for a country of 1.4 billion, ya know!  A century would be a reasonable time frame, but they will probably do it in 3/4s of a century.

Pollution? Big subject!  This is not the place to take it on in detail. But, suffice to say, Xi Jinping and the Communist Party of China have indicated very clearly their intent to build an Ecological Civilization in the coming decades; listen to the relevant portion of Xi's address at the 19th Congress last week. And it is not just talk. They are putting huge investments into it, in the form of renewable energy conversion, backing-away from coal burning, commitment to all-electric transport, build-out of high-speed rail (20,000 miles by 2020!) , and much more. They have huge eco-restoration projects both underway and in planning. Their energy and CO2 intensity per unit GDP is decreasing, absolute CO2 emissions are falling,  water consumption per unit of industrial value is falling, etc., etc.  Their 5-year plans outline all the specifics, which are increasingly green and sustainability oriented.  They are on their way. It is a PROCESS, not an event. It will take some decades. Big deal.  All big things that are worthwhile take some decades.  The U.S. was a filthy polluted mess, too, at one time, and it took many decades to clean it up. I suspect the Chinese will do it in half the time.

"China has its own problems that will come to bite it on the ass"? The Chinese, you will note, are damned good  (energetic, and dedicated, and persistent, and etc.) at solving their problems.  That would be unlike certain other parties whose names I will not mention, America.

 

kaimu's picture
kaimu
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 20 2013
Posts: 158
TEXAS BUGS

Aloha! Seems as if your Florida love bugs moved to Texas because here we have much larger swarms than usual. We had to stop four times to clean bugs off the windshield on a four hour drive.

http://www.kbtx.com/content/news/Love-bugs-bugging-drivers-making-mess-4...

I do not think "we" have royally screwed up the planet as much as government wants us to think. I think we have a population problem in the Third World that is being exported to the First World. I also think the First World has a "consumption" problem. There is no reason for this tech addiction and this disposable society to exist at the levels it has reached. 

The USA is 5% of the global population but consumes 25% of global energy resources, mainly fossil fuels. 

There are so many painless ways to cut back on consumption.

I have no doubts that the planet will out live the human race.

 

 

Snydeman's picture
Snydeman
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 376
Edwardelinski wrote: Our
Edwardelinski wrote:

Our family became members a few years ago.My visits were to learn about the environment.I have a decent handle on the economy.Not having been in some time you reminded me of why we left.The thing is,I would have been the one to tell you when it was the time for your family to run to the bank....

Well, if I spoke in such a way as to turn you off to the site, I apologize. I'm stressed, fearful, and tired. Nonetheless, dislike or disagree me and my comments, but please don't hold the rest of the community as being represented by me. 

Snydeman's picture
Snydeman
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 6 2013
Posts: 376
alan2102
alan2102 wrote:

Demographics?  Looking pretty good, I would say, with a fertility rate of 1.5, far below replacement. Actually, if they have a demographic problem it is one of too-low fertility and a possible population bust later in the century (too small of a working age population relative to aged population).  But generally looking pretty good.

Water? Looking better and better as the South-to-North water diversion project continues. As you know, it is a 50-year project, which will eventually deliver ~45 billion cubic meters of water from the wet south to the dry north, annually.   It is not even half done, yet. But portions are in operation, and Beijing's water supply has improved dramatically, resulting in sharp reductions in groundwater drawdown and other favorable changes.  Much more to come, all in good time. It takes TIME to build effective, ultra-modern infrastructure for a country of 1.4 billion, ya know!  A century would be a reasonable time frame, but they will probably do it in 3/4s of a century.

Pollution? Big subject!  This is not the place to take it on in detail. But, suffice to say, Xi Jinping and the Communist Party of China have indicated very clearly their intent to build an Ecological Civilization in the coming decades; listen to the relevant portion of Xi's address at the 19th Congress last week. And it is not just talk. They are putting huge investments into it, in the form of renewable energy conversion, backing-away from coal burning, commitment to all-electric transport, build-out of high-speed rail (20,000 miles by 2020!) , and much more. They have huge eco-restoration projects both underway and in planning. Their energy and CO2 intensity per unit GDP is decreasing, absolute CO2 emissions are falling,  water consumption per unit of industrial value is falling, etc., etc.  Their 5-year plans outline all the specifics, which are increasingly green and sustainability oriented.  They are on their way. It is a PROCESS, not an event. It will take some decades. Big deal.  All big things that are worthwhile take some decades.  The U.S. was a filthy polluted mess, too, at one time, and it took many decades to clean it up. I suspect the Chinese will do it in half the time.

"China has its own problems that will come to bite it on the ass"? The Chinese, you will note, are damned good  (energetic, and dedicated, and persistent, and etc.) at solving their problems.  That would be unlike certain other parties whose names I will not mention, America.

 

Alan,

Well, I'll let other, more technical-expertise types here at PP comment on individual programs, but let me say that I wholeheartedly agree with two major things you seem to be saying: Yes, China is far advanced in terms of tackling these issues head-on, and yes they will be in better shape when these major global crises hit than we here in the United States will be. So, I agree with you!

 

Where we might diverge is that I am less certain China will have such programs and improvements in place at a large enough scale in time. I'm also dubious of any data that comes out of China from official Chinese sources, since the CCP has a history of "padding the numbers." I'm skeptical by nature, though.

 

-S

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments